electionline Weekly

April 18, 2019

April 18, 2019

In Focus This Week

Paper or plastic (sorta)?
States begin to push alternatives to paper for third party reg groups

By M. Mindy Moretti
Electionline.org

In a world of smartphones, tablets and online voter registration (OVR), there is one place where paper still reigns as king — third-party voter registration organizations.

Although some of the leaders in the field, like Rock the Vote, no longer utilize paper applications, many organizations still do for a variety of reasons ranging from the lack of reliable Internet connections at events, mining the non-sensitive registrant data to conduct direct voter contact for get-out-the-vote efforts and in most cases, paper ballot applications are typically faster for registrants to use.

However, according to Jen Tolentino, director of policy and civic tech at Rock the Vote,  there are disadvantages to paper registrations, both for voter registration organizations and election administrators to paper applications, most top of mind is data entry and applicant errors (i.e. accidently skipping fields, difficult to read handwriting, etc.).

Now, a handful of states are coming up with solutions in an effort to streamline the process and maybe save a tree or two in the process.

“In states that take a connected voter registration approach…third parties are able to develop secure, paperless mobile applications that address many of the issues raised by paper and the challenges of OVR for third parties,” Tolentino said.

The states, that include California, Colorado, Pennsylvania, Washington and Virginia either provide third-party organizations with unique URLs for online sign-ups or an application programming interface (API).

  • California offers unique URLs and an API to pre-populate data to their website for select groups;
  • Colorado offers unique URLs and some non-sensitive registration data;
  • Pennsylvania offers an API and collected e-signatures for third-parties to build applications;
  • Virginia offers an API for third-parties to build applications and unique URLs; and
  • Washington offers unique URLs, data pre-population to website, and contact information

“We like this service because we are guaranteed to get the application for each voter. And they get registered much faster than relying on the paper forms,” Lori Augino, director of elections for the Washington Secretary of State’s Office, explained. “Plus, the accuracy is improved. Applicants standing outside at an event filling out a paper form are not always as careful. Applicants rarely make mistakes when entering their own information online. It saves money too. Processing online applications over the paper forms saves at least $1.25 per application.”

Augino said Washington’s system was designed to allow for maximum flexibility. They only need to be sure to issue a unique code that is appended to each URL so that the office knows that the registration source was a specific voter registration drive.

According to Kafia Hosh, communications officer with King County Elections, the reaction from third-party groups has been positive, especially among the groups that have websites and social media.

“We are aware of 10 organizations that used the URL program in 2018,” Hosh explained. “Through our Voter Education Fund, we inform community-based organizations about the URL program. In 2018, nine of these organizations used the URL program. And one organization that wasn’t a part of the Voter Education Fund also used the program.”

Hosh added that were some organizations that weren’t interested in using the URL program, stating that the communities they serve do not use online methods.

In California, the secretary of state’s office not only provides unique URLs to outside third-party registration groups, they also provide those unique URLs to other governmental agencies. Colleges and universities throughout the state also used the unique URLs and are then able to participate the Ballot Bowl Voter Registration Competition.

For governmental agencies, the unique URLs allows the office to capture the number of online registrations submitted that were referred to the secretary of state from the outside agency. This allows for the secretary of state to report NVRA statistics to the legislature.

“In 2018, five counties adopted the Voter’s Choice Act, moving to a vote center based election model. Every vote center was required to provide ‘same-day’ voter registration (known as conditional voter registration in state election law),” explained Sam Mahood, press secretary for the secretary of state’s office. “These counties used unique URLs to track online voter registrations that occurred at vote centers.”

API
According to Tolentino, while OVR is now widely available, making the process easier for voters to register themselves, third-party voter registration efforts often struggle to effectively leverage state websites. This leads to either a continued reliance on paper applications in the field or some voters beginning the process but never becoming fully registered from digital efforts.

“Rock the Vote is leading the effort to address the challenges facing voter registration for third parties, promoting the adoption of a secure, connected voter registration approach that would allow approved third parties to “drop off” complete, electronic voter registration applications.” Tolentino said.

This approach has already been implemented in Pennsylvania and Virginia and there is a common data format available for the electronic transfer of voter registration records. Tolentino said a connected voter registration approach would result in the following benefits:

Enable approved third-parties to develop seamless technology to securely register voters online and in the field, eliminating the majority of paper applications and the need for a constant internet connection;

Facilitate election administrators’ ability to easily audit voter registration applications, immediately identifying issues with specific applications and third-party groups;

  • Take advantage of NIST’s common data format for Voter Records Interchange to increase scalability and national adoption;
  • Eliminate duplicative data entry by third-party groups, local election administrators, and voters; and
  • Ensure all voter registration applications are complete and submitted in the requested format.

California also offers an API, but at this time, only for Rock the Vote and one other third-party registration group. Washington is gearing up to launch its own API, VoteWA on May 28.

“The API allows for more fields to be prepopulated for the user,” Augino explained “For example, if a voter registration drive already has the applicant’s name and date of birth, they can prepopulate those fields for them so that they don’t have to re-enter that information. It’s even more user friendly for the voter. The URL for the API will be different because we will be using a different application and branding for our new voter tools.”

Obviously the use of unique URLs and APIs for third-party groups is still in the early stages and some states, while interested, are moving cautiously about the challenges they may face in implementation.

“I wouldn’t say that the secretary is skeptical about providing unique URLs to 3rd party OVR groups, just that he’s realistic about the challenges we could face in implementation,” explained Ben Petok, director of communications for the Minnesota secretary of state’s office. “Not only would we need to programming to collect the information on who uses the URL, but would almost certainly need a change in state law to accommodate the data practice issues around use of unique URLs for this purpose.”

Tolentino noted that using unique URLs/APIs would actually help states eliminate problems with late and incorrect registration forms that some states, like Tennessee, are trying to correct legislatively.

Under HB1079/SB971 fines of up to $10,000 dollars would be imposed on third-party organizations that pay people to conduct registration drives, and turn in more than 500 incomplete forms. It would also require groups to submit the forms within 10 days.

“The bill in Tennessee would place a huge burden on many voter registration organizations and significantly thwart all on-the-ground efforts,” Tolentino said. “If Tennessee is committed to ensuring they only receive complete and accurate voter registration forms, there are technical enhancements the state could make without punishing voter registration groups who are working tirelessly to reach all voters across the state.”

 

2020 Candidates on Election Issues

Sen. Corey Booker (D-New Jersey) and a presidential candidate proposed a “new Voting Rights Act,” while speaking at an event in Atlanta. According to The Hill, the new VRA would focus on a three-part goal of protecting voting rights, expanding voting access and making it easier to vote. Booker’s proposal would establish automatic registration as well as the expansion of voting by mail, early voting and same-day voter registration.

“For years, the right to vote for millions of Americans — disproportionately in communities of color —has been under assault,” Booker said. “It is time for a new Voting Rights Act to finally put an end to systematic attempts to limit access to the ballot box and strip citizens of their constitutionally guaranteed right to vote.”

Election News This Week

A U.S. House elections committee held a hearing about Native American voting rights on the Standing Rock Reservation in North Dakota this week. Witnesses at the hearing testified that Native American voters face poor access to polling sites, discrimination by poll workers and unfair ID requirements. “There continues to be barriers — interpersonal and systemic — at our polling locations in our tribal communities and for our Native voters across the state,” said activist Prairie Rose Seminole, a member of the Mandan, Hidatsa & Arikara Nation in northwestern North Dakota according to The Associated Press. Much of the hearing focused on North Dakota’s new ID law which requires a “provable” street address, something many who live on Reservations don’t have. Some activists took issue with so much of the focus being on the North Dakota ID issue. “There are voter suppression issues going on throughout Indian Country that aren’t nearly getting the attention or resources that were poured into North Dakota because it just so happened that Sen. Heitkamp was running for re-election, and the Senate balance of power elevated this issue to the national stage,” Native American Rights Fund attorney Jacqueline De Leon testified.

While litigation over bilingual ballots is still pending, Gov. Ron DeSantis (R) has asked Secretary of State Laurel Lee to adopt rules that would standardize the requirements for offering bilingual ballots in all 67 of the state’s counties. Currently, according to the Tampa Bay Times, the 46 counties that offer bilingual ballots in the Sunshine State all have different rules. “It is critically important that Spanish-speaking Floridians are able to exercise their right to vote without any language barriers,” DeSantis said in a statement. “Florida has a significant Spanish-speaking population and our state is home to many Puerto Ricans who moved here after the devastation of Hurricane Maria.”

Election officials have told The Register-Herald that the West Virginia Division of Motor Vehicles has been losing voter registrations, but it’s unclear exactly how many and for how long this has been happening. Donald Kersey, the general counsel for the secretary of state’s office said that in a five-day test period in January that 37 registered to vote with the DMV, but those registrations did not reach the secretary of state’s office. Kersey told the paper it appears to be “a systematic error,” and he noted that during early voting before the 2018 general election, dozens of people said they had registered at local DMVs to vote, but the Secretary of State’s office had no record of it. “That’s a terrible experience, and if it’s your first time, you might not want to vote again because you had a bad experience,” he told the paper.

The City of Atlanta recently opened a new green space that honors the memory of someone people refer to as the “Godmother of Voter Registration.” The Department of Parks and Recreation dedicated the “Ella Mae Wade Brayboy Memorial Park” at the intersection of Burbank and Lena Streets near the Washington Park neighborhood in the city’s west side. According to WATL, Brayboy was one of the first black deputy registrars in Atlanta in 1964, where she helped restructure voter registration so that it woven into the community – through the Atlanta Public Library System. Over the course of her lifetime, historians say she helped register more than 20,000 black voters.

Personnel News: Former public commissioner Sam Britton is running for Mississippi secretary of state. Garrett Archer, election data analyst for the Arizona secretary of state’s office has resigned. Kim Fontenot is the new Calcasieu Parish registrar of voters. Donald Robinette is the new Harrison County, Texas election administrator.

Research and Report Summaries

The Brennan Center released a report on automatic voter registration (AVR) last week. The report, AVR Impact on State Voter Registration, highlights that 15 states and the District of Columbia have enacted AVR as of March 2019, reflecting swift adoption of the policy since Oregon first passed the reform in 2014. The report documents the variations of AVR thus far adopted in implementing states, including where voter registration opt-out decisions take place (e.g. during a “front-end” point-of-service transaction or through a “back-end” post-transaction mailer) and the state agencies involved, typically the motor vehicle licensing agency.

Comparing registration rate increases in AVR-implementing jurisdictions to demographically similar non-implementing jurisdictions, the study concludes that AVR increased the number of registrants in AVR-implementing jurisdictions, ranging from 9 to 94 percent. According to the study, AVR-implementing jurisdictions experienced the following registration rate increases:

  • Alaska – 33.7%
  • California – 26.8%
  • Colorado – 16%
  • District of Columbia – 9.4%
  • Georgia – 93.7%
  • Oregon – 15.9%
  • Rhode Island – 47.4%
  • Vermont – 60.2%

(Research and Report Summaries are written by David Kuennen.)

Legislative Updates

Arizona: HB2238 has been approved by the Legislature and now heads to the governor’s desk for his signature. Under the bill, the secretary of state’s office will be required to issue updated election procedures manual every election cycle.

Gov. Doug Ducey (R) has signed a bill into law restricting the use of emergency voting.

California: The San Jose City Council has voted down a proposal that would aligned the city’s mayoral elections with presidential election years.

Colorado: SB19-235 would create a system of automatic voter registration through the state’s motor vehicle administration.

Delaware: Both chambers of the Legislature has approved an early voting bill that will allow for early voting up to 10 days ahead of Election Day at one of four early voting sites statewide. The governor has said he will sign the legislation into law.

Georgia: Gov. Brian Kemp (R) has signed legislation into law that will have voter registrations canceled after nine years of inactivity instead of seven. The new law also requires that voters receive additional notice in the mail before they’re removed from the rolls.

Illinois: Under Senate Bill 2090, approved last week, county election officials will be required to work with county jails to make sure inmates are aware of elections happening in the state. The legislation mainly focuses on pre-trial detainees.

Indiana: By a 65-31 vote the House has approved HB1311 that will move the deadline for mail-in ballots from eight to 12 days before an election. The bill was approved 37-9 by the Senate and if signed by the governor will take effect Jan. 1, 2020.

A bill restructuring how Porter County handles its elections passed a final reading before the House of Representatives Thursday and is now headed to Gov. Eric Holcomb’s desk for a signature.

Kansas: Governor Laura Kelly has signed legislation into law that will allow counties to move to vote centers if they choose. It also requires county election officials to attempt to contact voters who submit mail ballots with signature issues.

Mississippi: Bills to restore the voting rights of 16 felons have passed through the legislative process and are headed to the governor’s desk. According to Mississippi Today, this is the most to make it through the legislative process since 2004 when 34 felons has their electoral rights restored.

Nevada: A Senate committee has approved a bill that will allow for a same-day voter registration.

New York: Senate Bill S4032 has cleared the Senate Elections Committee. Under the proposed bill, any locality wishing to make changes to voting procedures must first clear it with the New York State attorney general to ensure that the changes do not infringe on New Yorkers’ voting rights on the basis of race, color, language or minority status.

North Carolina: In a 100-9 vote, the House gave approval to H646, which clarifies the requirements for student IDs to also serve as voter IDs and extends the application deadline.

Pennsylvania: The Senate State Government Committee has advanced a bill that would delay the decertification of voting machines until lawmakers and the Gov. Tom Wolf can agree to a replacement plan and how to pay for it.

Tennessee: The House has approved a bill that would impose fines of up to $10,000 on organizations that pay people to conduct registration drives, and turn in more than 500 incomplete forms.  It would also require groups to submit the forms within 10 days. And it would prohibit out-of-state poll watchers.

Texas: The Senate has approved Senate Bill 9 that among other things increases criminal penalties for anyone who provides false information on a voter registration form. Currently, providing false information on an application is a Class B misdemeanor. Under the bill, it would become a “state jail felony.” The legislation also increases criminal penalties for casting a ballot – including a provisional ballot – if you aren’t eligible to vote. SB 9 also requires paper ballot backups for electronic voting machines in Texas.

Washington: Gov. Jay Inslee (D) has signed Senate Bill 5207 into law. The legislation is focused on streamlining the process and notification requirements to felons of their voting rights restoration.

Legal Updates

Minnesota: The state Court of Appeals has affirmed a lower court ruling that sided with the Minnesota Voters Alliance in their attempt to obtain data of millions of voters. The data pertain to a voter’s status including whether they’ve been challenged, the reason for that challenge and their voting history. The courts say the data is public under Minnesota’s open records law. Secretary of State Steve Simon has vowed to appeal.

Missouri: A judge has ordered a new election for parts of Parkville after some voters were given the wrong ballots on Election Day. The new vote will take place on May 21.

New Hampshire: A bench trial over Senate Bill 3 will take place in Hillsborough County Superior court from Sept. 3-6 and Sept. 9-13.

North Carolina: Guadalupe Espinosa-Pena, 61, a native of Mexico, has been sentenced to one month in federal prison for illegally voting in the 2016 election.

Pennsylvania: Philadelphia City Controller Rebecca Rhynhart has subpoenaed city elections officials for documents related to the city’s voting machine selection. The items requested in the subpoena include copies of all proposals received, the names of all committee members who scored them, and copies of those evaluations.

Rhode Island: Judge Melissa E. Darigan has ruled that Watchdog RI does not have legal standing to appeal the state board of elections’ denial of a fee waiver—$400—to for a public records request.

Texas: Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton has denied a request by the U.S. House Oversight and Reform Committee for documents related to the state’s botched attempt to remove alleged noncitizens from the state’s voter rolls.  In a letter, Paxton and his staff say the House committee lacks “oversight jurisdiction” over his own office, or over the Texas Secretary of State, which launched the purge effort in late January. “The committee appears to be inserting itself into the statutorily-required efforts on the part of state officials to detect and prosecute non-citizen voting,” Paxton said according to The Houston Chronicle.

Also in Texas, Charles Nathan Jackson, 51, of no fixed address, has been sentenced to 10 days in jail after he pleaded guilty to providing false information on a voting application.

Tech Thursday

Websites: This week the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) launched a refreshed website! According to NCSL, the new look is part of NCSL’s rebranding, which includes our new logo and a bold redesign of State Legislatures magazine. Congratulations to everyone at NCSL, we are all too familiar with the hard work that goes into launching a refreshed website.

Kansas: Sedgwick County Election Commissioner Tabitha Lehman is working with the county technology department to develop a new election app that will help implement the newly approved vote center system. “We’re going to have an app where you can go in and put in your address and get a radius of polling places and see the wait times, and pick where you want to go vote before you walk out your door,” Lehman told The Wichita Eagle. “It’s going to be really cool.” She said the app has the potential to help balance out election traffic, reducing lines at some of the county’s busier polling places.

Kentucky: GoVoteKY, Kentucky’s online voter registration system has officially hit one million registrations/registration updates. The portal was first launched in 2016.

Opinions This Week

National Opinions: Ranked choice voting | Felon enfranchisement, II, III | Voter registration | Suffrage | Anti-voting | Cybersecurity | Voter suppression | Ranked choice voting

Arizona: Ranked choice voting | Election legislation

California: Motor voter

Colorado: Election legislation, II, III

Florida: Ex-felon voting rights

Georgia: Paper ballots | Voting equipment, II

Iowa: Ex-felon voting rights, II, III, IV | Election legislation | Voting rights

Massachusetts: Voter registration

Maine: Ranked choice voting, II

Montana: Vote-by-mail

New Jersey: Vote-by-mail | Gender neutral ballots

Oklahoma: Poll workers | List maintenance

Pennsylvania: Voting equipment, II, III

Tennessee: Election legislation, II, III | Ballot selfies | Election security

Texas: Election legislation, II | Election official

Vermont: Ranked choice voting

Upcoming Events

2019 RCV Symposium: Building a Solid Foundation — Join national election experts, election administrators, elected and government officials, and RCV proponents for this 2nd Annual online event focused on “Building a Solid Foundation” for ranked choice voting (RCV). Sessions include: Answers to mischaraterizations of RCV; Firsthand perspective from candidates who have campaigned for RCV contests; How to craft the message to educate voters, policy makers, and others including tips from a three-time Emmy Award-winning corporate filmmaker; And much more! Where: Online. When: April 29-30.

Election Mail Forum One-Day Conference — you are invited to participate in a special one-day Election Mail Forum exclusively at the National Postal Forum, Monday May 6, 2019 at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis Indiana. Come see community leaders showcase election mail. Don’t miss the opportunity to learn and network with Postal Service Leadership, State Election Executives, and election mail preparation vendors. Learn how to Leverage USPS Addressing Products to improve voter roll quality. Come learn about Full Service, STID, IMb— an alternative for “postmark” authentication. When: May 6. Where: Indianapolis.

National Association of Secretaries Of State — The National Association of Secretaries of State will hold their annual summer conference in late June, early July in New Mexico. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registrations. When: June 30-July 3. Where: Santa Fe, New Mexico.

International Association of Government Officials — “Educate-Elevate-Energize-Engage” is the theme of this year’s annual conference. The conference will include numerous education sessions and workshops as well as a visit to the NASA Houston Space Center. Where: Houston. When: July 11-17.

National Association of Counties — NACo’s 2019 Annual Conference will be held in Clark County (Las Vegas). Although the schedule and keynote speakers are still being hammered out there will be two symposiums on disaster management including an interactive roundtable. When: July 12-15. Where: Las Vegas.

National Association of State Election Directors — The NASED Summer Conference will be held in Austin, Texas, July 14-16, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Conference of State Legislatures: NCSL’s Legislative Summit will feature numerous elections-related sessions include several about redistricting, voter registration, infrastructure and the Census. And if that wasn’t enough, Dolly Parton will be one of the featured keynote speakers.  When: August 5-8. Where: Nashville.

Job Postings This Week

electionlineWeekly publishes election administration job postings each week as a free service to our readers. To have your job listed in the newsletter, please send a copy of the job description, including a web link to mmoretti@electionline.org.  Job postings must be received by 5pm on Wednesday in order to appear in the Thursday newsletter. Listings will run for three weeks or till the deadline listed in the posting.

Communications Manager, Hillsborough County, Florida— The Hillsborough County Supervisor of Elections is looking for a great communicator who will embrace our vision — to be the best place in America to vote! The right person will have strong writing and design skills and be adept at social media, marketing and media outreach. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Deputy Director, Washington Secretary of State’s Office— this position reports to the certification and training program manager and is responsible for overseeing, reviewing and advising county auditors on the federal and state elections laws and the administration of voter registration.  Serves as the lead program specialist in the required election administrator certification program; Certifies state and local election administrators following a series of classes and tests. Participates in the elections training program and county election review program; travels extensively throughout the state to conduct reviews of county elections departments. Participates in the initiative and referenda filing and clearinghouse advisories program. Provide support to Washington State counties on election processes, county WEI systems, and logic and accuracy test program. Salary: $4,275.00 – $5,745.00 Monthly. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Director, Miami County, Ohio Board of Elections— The Miami County Board of Elections is seeking applicants for the position of Director. This position, in cooperation with the Deputy Director, is responsible for overseeing, directing and managing the Board of Elections Office; developing, recommending, and adhering to an annual budget; and conducting fair and impartial elections. Qualified candidates must be affiliated with the Republican Party, reside within Miami County or be able to relocate within 30 days of accepting the position. Applicants must agree to a background check. A candidate for Director of the Board of Elections must possess at least a high school diploma or its equivalency. College level education is desired, and specialized training and/or certification in the various aspects of election administration is to be favored in evaluating applicants. Application: Applicants are requested to demonstrate how they meet the necessary qualifications of the job description when submitting their resume. Interested parties may receive a copy of the job description, evaluation criteria and Ohio Secretary of State Form 307 by visiting the Miami County Board of Elections website at www.miami.ohioboe.com. The website also has the Questionnaire for Prospective Appointment as a Member, Director or Deputy Director of the County Board of Elections (Form No. 307) on it. Any qualified registered Republican may apply by submitting Form 307, along with a current resume, to Miami County Board of Elections, Old Courthouse, 215 West Main Street, Troy, Ohio 45373, or by emailing iridgeway@miamicountyohio.gov. Applications will be accepted until the position is filled.

Director of Elections/General Registrar, Arlington County, Virginia— This is a four-year term position appointed by the Electoral Board with a starting date of July 1, 2019 and an end date of June 30, 2023. The Arlington County Electoral Board is seeking a Director of Elections/General Registrar to provide professional and technical leadership to the Office of Elections and manage the planning, overseeing, and administering of elections in Arlington County. The Director is responsible for ensuring the necessary resources are acquired and in place to maintain the list of registered voters and assure elections are well-prepared and conducted in an accurate, efficient, and transparent manner. Specific duties and responsibilities include: Planning, developing, coordinating, and directing the activities of the Office of Elections, including voter registration; candidate processing and filing; pre-election and Election Day voting; ballot design; equipment programming and testing; poll worker recruitment and training; and voter outreach efforts. Preparing and continuously evaluating the department’s strategic goals and equipment security plan. Supervising permanent and temporary staff of up to 50 individuals, including recruitment, training, scheduling and work assignment, implementation of policies and procedures, performance evaluation, and conflict resolution. Coordinating the administrative processes with the deputy registrar, including but not limited to, budget development and monitoring, County administrative and personnel policies, and technology resources. Consulting and coordinating with County Attorney and Commonwealth’s Attorney as needed on legal issues. Analyzing departmental performance and usage data to make informed projections about future needs, including staffing, space requirements, equipment, and supplies. Providing guidance and technical support to candidates seeking election to local offices, and certifying eligible candidates for elections, including reviewing qualifications and processing of petitions. Managing communication tools including web page, social media, and outreach materials, and ensuring information is accurate and timely. Monitoring legislation introduced at the state and federal levels related to elections and election administration, and providing advice and expertise to legislators as needed. Serving the community and professional organizations as a subject matter expert on elections and election administration; and representing the County at regional, state, and national workshops and conferences. This Director must be self-directed and will have no direct immediate supervisor but will report to and seek guidance from the Arlington County Electoral Board. Additionally, the incumbent will receive guidance and advice from the Virginia Department of Elections as well as from various County departments and is responsible for keeping the Board informed of all relevant matters pertaining to the smooth operation of the department. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Lead Specialist, Douglas County, Colorado— The Elections Lead Specialist assists in the supervision and coordination of elections operations, staff, and election judges including voter services, mail ballot processing and the conduct of elections. The objective of this position is to perform a variety of functions and diverse support roles on a routine basis. Mail Ballot Processing responsibilities are prioritized over other duties during election cycles, which may increase or decrease dramatically depending on the Elections cycle. In the absence of the Operations Manager, assumes responsibility for front-line functions associated with elections operations. This is a highly visible position requiring exceptional leadership, organizational, and communication skills. Salary: $3,550-$4,438 monthly. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Election Specialist II, Douglas County, Colorado— The Election Specialist II is responsible for routine support services related to temporary employees, training, Voter Service and Polling Centers, mail ballot processing, voter registration, and customer service. This position contributes to the department’s achievement of delivering efficient, transparent, fair and accurate elections as well as performs other projects as assigned. This position requires technical work in a lead role capable of performing a variety of complex tasks, with solving problem abilities, managing multiple competing tasks and prioritizing to maintain a continuous flow of operations and temporary support. This is a visible and crucial position requiring previous elections experience, and exceptional computer, customer service, and communication skills. Please note this position is posted as open until filled, review of applications will begin immediately and continue until a suitable candidate is selected. Salary: $3,214 – $4,017 Monthly. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

GIS Analyst, Yolo County, California— Yolo County ACE (Assessor/Clerk-Recorder/Elections Department) in coordination with the Yolo County General Services department are recruiting for a G.I.S. Analyst. This recruitment is on-going until filled. Submitted applications will be screened continuously, and those applicants meeting the minimum qualifications will move forward to the Screening for Best Qualified process. This position will work inter-departmentally to develop and implement GIS capabilities in Yolo County ACE. GIS is viewed by County Leadership as an innovative enterprise technology that is positioned to help advance County strategic goals. Recent projects include implementing a new enterprise environment, developing an Elections Night Reporting application, developing mobile applications for polling place reporting, and a migration the ESRI Parcel Fabric. The ideal candidate for this position will be a positive, collaborative, solution-focused individual with excellent interpersonal and customer service skills and the ability to handle and manage multiple priorities. If you feel like you meet these qualifications and you would like to join a dynamic organization committed to supporting an environment where employees feel a true sense of passion, purpose and commitment to their job… Yolo County ACE is where you want to be! Our department strives to honor the public’s trust and redefine excellence through innovation and the commitment of a highly-engaged and empowered team. Check out all the exciting things ACE has going on by visiting our social media pages (Facebook: /YoloACE, Instagram: /YoloCoACE, and Twitter: @YoloCoACE). You can be the next Yolo ACE – come and join our team! Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Project Manager, Hart InterCivic— Project Managers at Hart InterCivic are highly motivated “self-starters” who are enthusiastic about providing exceptional customer service. Working with other members of the Professional Services and Operations teams, the Project Manager directs activity, solves problems, and develops lasting and strong relationships with our customers. Hart InterCivic’s unique and industry known culture of innovation, transparency, and customer-centric focus creates an environment where team members will continually grow and be challenged to develop their careers. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Product Manager, Hart InterCivic — as Product Manager, you will join a team that is charged with product planning, design, and execution throughout the lifecycle of Hart’s products, in support of the company’s overall strategy and goals. This includes: gathering, validating, and prioritizing internal and external customer needs; documenting and communicating product and technical requirements; gathering market and competitive intelligence; supporting the certification, sales, and marketing teams. The Product Manager must possess a unique blend of business and technical savvy – with experience in elections technology or other government-oriented products preferred.  To succeed in this role, the ideal candidate must spend time in the market to understand its unique attributes; demonstrate competence with specialized hardware and software; and find innovative solutions for the broader market. The Product Manager plays a key role in helping others to understand the product positioning, key benefits, and target customer, as well as providing advanced subject matter expertise in using the company’s products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Red Team Independent Contractor, Galois— Galois seeks an experienced Red Team Lead with red teaming and/or CTF experience of purported secure systems that include custom hardware to play a pivotal role in fulfilling our mission to make trustworthy critical systems. The role will be responsible for the strategic and tactical direction of a small team dedicated to red team activities. The team is responsible for developing threat simulation services, threat research, structured attack development, vulnerability research and exploit development/testing, scripting and controlled exploitation of hardware and software vulnerabilities. The scope of the position also requires understanding a complex cyber-physical system architecture to develop a precise threat model, red teaming framing, and win conditions for both the DEF CON exercises. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Software Sales Specialist, VOTEC— VOTEC’s Sales Specialist is responsible for creating news sales with prospects and existing clients in targeted areas in the US. We are looking for an election professional comfortable using insight and consultative selling techniques to create interest that offers unique solutions on their operations, which link back to VOTEC’s solutions. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Systems Engineer, Arizona Secretary of State’s Office — The Department of State is seeking a Systems Engineer. The Systems Engineer is a full-time/on-call position that requires extensive experience in Server/Systems Administration. Responsible for the selection, technical design, implementation, operation, maintenance and recovery procedures for enterprise systems including server hardware, hypervisors, operating systems, system applications, storage systems and networking components. Provides leadership in planning and implementation of projects for computer operations and enterprise systems administration, ensuring these plans maximize benefits and minimize impacts on the organization. Providing a safe, secure environment is the utmost priority for the organization. A few ways the Systems/Network Engineer will be responsible for maintaining security is via patching, network segmentation, and utilizing tools provided by the State. Salary: 60K-75K. Deadline: April 30. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Systems Software Specialist, Yolo County, California — The Elections Branch of Yolo County ACE (Assessor/Clerk-Recorder/Elections Department) in coordination with the Yolo County Information Technology department are recruiting for a Systems Software Specialist. This recruitment is on-going until filled. The Systems Software Specialist class series is responsible for the design, coding, implementation, maintenance and evaluation of computer software. This includes, but is not limited to, operating systems, control systems, proprietary software packages, telecommunications software and database management software. The class also aides in solving problems and achieving the best use of available hardware and software; work with staff to design and implement network segmentation, domain addressing and routing strategies; work with technical staff to ensure effective operations of complex multiple hardware and software configurations; and act as a lead persons over other personnel and program projects and performs related duties as required. If you would like to join a dynamic organization committed to supporting an environment where employees feel a true sense of passion, purpose and commitment to their job… Yolo County ACE is where you want to be! Our department strives to honor the public’s trust and redefine excellence through innovation and the commitment of a highly-engaged and empowered team. Check out all the exciting things ACE has going on by visiting our social media pages (Facebook: /YoloACE, Instagram: /YoloCoACE, and Twitter: @YoloCoACE). You can be the next Yolo ACE – come and join our team! Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Technical Bid Specialist, Scytl — The Technical Bid Specialist is an essential member of the sales team, supporting business development initiatives as well as providing support to the Marketing department. Based in our Tampa Florida, offices, the Technical Bid Specialist is in charge of managing the coordination, completion and handover of tender proposals for our clients and prospects. This is a key position with a great deal of involvement in the sales process and a decisive influence in the achievement of each deal. To be able to perform this task, the Technical Bid Specialist needs to possess a solid technical background, outstanding writing capabilities and proven experience in pre-sales or consulting endeavors, always facing the client and having to put together complex IT proposals or projects. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Training Officer, Collier County, Florida— The purpose of this classification is to provide assistance in the Training & Outreach Department within the Supervisor of Elections office. This position coaches, trains, and educates election workers in accordance with the State of Florida’s election laws and rules. Work involves designing, developing, and delivering multimodal adult learning programs, developing training materials, scheduling training sessions, and recruiting, assigning and evaluating election workers for upcoming election cycles. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Marketplace

electionline provides no guarantees as to the quality of the items being sold and the accuracy of the information provided about the sale items in the Marketplace. Ads are provided directly by sellers and are not verified by electionline. If you have an ad for Marketplace, please email it to: mmoretti@electionline.org

Excess Equipment
Pinal County, Arizona has some excess elections equipment including 19 OS machines and approximately 300 voter booths. If interested, contact Stephanie Cooper, Pinal County elections supervisor at 520-866-7552 or drop her an email at stephanie.cooper@pinalcountyaz.gov.

 

 

Ballot Scanners
Ballot reader. $500. Buyer will be responsible for pick and shipping to buyer’s location. Contact Wilfred Cochico, purchasing officer City of Lakewood: 562-866-9771 ext. 2640 or via email: WCochico@lakewoodcity.org.

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In Focus This Week

April 11, 2019

April 11, 2019

In Focus This Week

Exit Interview: Brian Hancock
After 35 years in the public sector, Hancock retires

Earlier this year, after 35 years working for the federal government, Brian Hancock retired.

As most of you know, at the time of his retirement, Hancock was the U.S. Election Assistance Commission’s (EAC) Testing & Certification Director. He was the first and only director of the program that was mandated by the Help America Vote Act.

While at the EAC, Hancock oversaw the development of three sets of Voluntary Voting System Guidelines (the current iteration is ending its public comment period) and according to the EAC, led the Testing and Certification team to complete 52 campaigns to certify in full, or modify, voting systems.

“I can say without a doubt that no one has dedicated more of his life to the American election system than Brian Hancock,” Doug Chapin, director of election research for Fors Marsh Group wrote in a recent blog post.

Before joining the EAC, Hancock was on the staff on the staff of the Federal Election Commission (FEC) including 13 years as an elections research specialist in the FEC’s Office of Election Administration.

Although Hancock has retired from government service, he hasn’t gone far. He is currently the director of infrastructure policy and product development at Unisyn Voting Solutions.

We recently asked Hancock to partake in one of our exit interviews to get his thoughts on the past, present and future of voting technology.

Why did you decide to retire from the EAC at this time?
Thanks Mindy. I do need to preface my remarks by noting that these answers represent my personal thoughts and are not based on nor intended to describe the current state of affairs of the Testing and Certification program or the EAC in general.

Well, 35 years doing anything is quite a long time….   Seriously, the commute from home to the EAC offices in Silver Spring was wearing on both my nerves and my vehicle, the government shutdown gave me some additional time to think about my future and what my priorities should be, and, finally, it seemed like the EAC was moving in a new direction for certification, and I thought it best that someone new be around to help guide those changes.

From the FEC to the EAC you’ve been in testing and certification for a long time. How have things changed with testing and certification from those FEC days to now and how would you like to see them continue to evolve?
At the FEC, as you might remember, we did not actually do the testing and certification. FEC worked with NIST and the election community to develop the first 2 Voting System Standards (in 1990 and 2002).  At that point, NASED ran what they called a voluntary qualification program for those early electronic systems. FEC staff usually attended the NASED voting system meetings as sort of ad hoc advisors, but the decision making was done solely by NASED. Obviously HAVA changed all that and the EAC was tasked with developing the first truly national (though still voluntary), testing and certification program.  We developed the program to very closely mirror what is now ISO /IEC 17011:2017, the International Standard for accrediting conformity assessment bodies.

Elections are a dynamic environment that poses a constant challenge for any certification body, and we certainly had our share of challenges over the years. We were not perfect, but I think we did our best to find solutions to issues that were acceptable to all parties (vendor, State, LEO, voters, etc.) Moving forward, the EAC adopting the VVSG 2.0 Principles and Guidelines and the new internal certification process will be huge. Aside from that, I think the industry as a whole needs to do a better job of developing processes for allowing jurisdictions to implement critical security patches, as well as look at some more innovative solutions to speed the certification process such as manufacturer declaration of conformity.

What do you believe the impact of the 2016 election (and changed threat environment) will be to the industry and marketplace.
2016 changed forever the way the election community looks at system security. Election officials have always been concerned about security, but 2016 really drove home the notion that cyber security needed to be addressed directly, and that nation-state actors were keenly interested in disrupting our election process. This new reality will take constant vigilance and cooperation between Federal State and local officials. We’ve made huge strides in these areas since 2016, but we still have a long way to go.

If you could design the perfect voting system, what would it look like?
Wow. Loaded question in so many ways. I guess what I would say is that I have not yet seen such a system and like perfection anywhere, it’s probably more of a goal than a reality. I do think that Dean Logan has provided a good road map for system development with his new LA County voting system. I don’t believe that the product itself is the really innovative part, but his process was certainly unique and we can all learn from it. Dean and his team took a people centric approach to designing the system. They asked what the public and what the poll workers in LA wanted and needed from their new voting system, and used the answers to these questions as the groundwork for his system.

Do you think the general public will ever be able to cast a vote online?
Absolutely! Will they do it in my lifetime? Doubtful.  Unless someone is really close to solving the problem of securing the internet, we have a long way to go before on-line voting is a reality.

The last thing I wanted to say is a big thank you to all the folks who worked with me and for me in the EAC Testing and Certification Division from 2005 to 2019! Without those great folks, whatever success we had would not have been possible.

Election Security Updates

Department of Homeland Security Kirstjen Nielsen has resigned effective immediately. How that may impact the administration cybersecurity efforts remains to be seen, but The Washington Post has an article expressing the concerns of cyber experts since Nielsen was one of the last civilians at the top ranks of DHS with extensive cybersecurity expertise.

“Hopefully whoever runs DHS will prioritize its vital cybersecurity mission, but it makes a difference if the person at the top has a background in cyber and knows from experience how important it is rather than just being told,” former State Department cyber coordinator Chris Painter told the Post. “DHS is spread thin among multiple priorities as it is, and without a clear mandate from department leadership that cybersecurity is a prime mission, their efforts risk being sidelined.”

According to Politico, the founder of Craigslist and the Global Cyber Alliance are teaming up to provide free cyber defense toolkits to election officials, nonprofit election rights groups and the media modeled after the ones GCA recently pioneered for small businesses. Craig Newmark Philanthropies is offering GCA more than $1 million for the project, and GCA is netting $1.5 million from other sources, the groups are announced this week.

2020 Candidates on Election Issues

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders (I), a candidate for president in 2020 recently told a crowd in Iowa that he believes convicted felons should have the right to vote and not just after they have completed the terms of their service, but also while they are still incarcerated.

“In my state, what we do is separate. You’re paying a price, you committed a crime, you’re in jail. That’s bad,” Sanders said according to Newsweek. “But you’re still living in American society, and you have a right to vote. I believe in that, yes, I do. I think that is absolutely the direction we should go,”

According to the Huffington Post, no other 2020 candidates have taken up the issue, although several campaigns said their first focus is on restoring voting rights to those formerly incarcerated.

Election News This Week

Earlier this year, Ohio boards of elections sent out last-chance postcards to those in danger of being purged from the voter rolls. In March, Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose launched the “Fresh Start Campaign,” an effort to reach out the thousands of voters who had been purged from the state’s voter rolls due to inactivity. The program sent out letters to t264,516 voters at a cost of $130,512. At this time, 540 people have re-registered to vote. “Every vote matters, and that’s why our ‘Fresh Start Campaign’ left no stone unturned,” LaRose said in a statement. “Moving forward, we’re working on finding ways to modernize our system so Ohioans can update their registration whenever they interact with state government. By doing so, we’ll be fulfilling our obligation to state and federal law to ensure election integrity, all while minimizing the impact to infrequent voters.”

Work continues in Butte County, California to determine where all the registered voters displaced by the devastating Camp Fire are now living and where they may be at the time of the next election. The registrar of voters office is sending out thousands of postcards asking about residents’ plans. “If they haven’t made up their mind, that’s OK. We understand,” Candace Grubbs, Butte County clerk-recorder and registrar of voters told the Enterprise-Record. Grubbs said that 19,000 post cards are going out that asking voters about their intentions so the county can get the right ballot information to them. “People have scattered so our job is to find these people. We’re trying to determine who’s coming back and who isn’t,” said Grubbs. “Their residence determines the election they can vote in.”

To the approximately 53 percent of registered voters in America who didn’t vote in the 2018 election, let us tell you about Howard Meador of Norman, Oklahoma. On his way into his polling place on April 2 Meador took a nasty tumble and ended up with gash on his face and cuts on his arms. Before the local paramedics were about to take Meador to the hospital, one of them happened to ask him if he had gotten a chance to vote yet and when Meador said no,  they put him on a gurney and took him inside so he could vote. Polling place volunteers were ready to help him get checked in and the paramedics even helped him get his ID out to show the check-in clerk. After watching his ballot go into the scanner, Meador headed to the hospital to get checked out (he’s fine). “I just think everybody ought to do that [vote],” Howard told The Norman Transcript. “Here’s a town of over 100,000 people, and if we get 20,000 people out to vote, that’s bad. I’ve always voted. I always try to make it. If I couldn’t be here, I’d mail it in or something.” Three cheers to Norman Meador for fulfilling his civic duty no matter what and three cheers to the Norman Fire Department and EMSSTAT and the poll workers for making sure Meador was able to vote!

Personnel News: Jacob Gran is the new Bucksport, Maine clerk. Tara Hampton has been hired as the new elections director in Santa Cruz, Arizona. Lily Stainback has resigned as the Pender County, North Carolina director of elections. Jackie James has been hired as a contractor for three months in the New Haven, Connecticut registrar of voters office.

Research and Report Summaries

The Orange County, California Registrar of Voters office released a report on its 2018 risk-limiting audit pilot project this week. To compare the use of statistically based audit techniques and traditional post-election audits, the report highlights Orange County’s experience concurrently conducting California’s traditional 1 percent manual tally and a risk-limiting audit pilot. To serve as an example to jurisdictions considering risk-limiting audits, Orange County conducted two risk-limiting audit pilots in 2018 using its legacy voting system. The report concludes that: a risk-limiting audits could be conducted with slight adjustments using a legacy voting system; the ballot polling method was an appropriate method for the county; creating a ballot-sheet manifest without a compatible voting system presented challenges; and simultaneously conducting a risk-limiting audit and a 1 percent manual tally taxed scarce resources during the post-election period.

The Brookings Institution released a report on voter registration via tax filing last week. The study, The Filer Voter experiment: How effective is voter registration at tax time?, tests whether voter registration at tax time could be an effective, low-cost policy mechanism to increase voter registration and turnout, and to improve the representativeness of the voting population. Using randomized control trials at Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) centers in Cleveland, OH and Dallas, TX in the spring of 2018, the study finds that the “Filer Voter” program significantly increased registration rates among the initially unregistered. Those provided the opportunity to register during their visit to a VITA center (the treatment group) registered to vote at a rate of 8.8 percent, compared to only 3.9 percent of those who were not provided the opportunity (the control group).

(Research and Report Summaries are written by David Kuennen.)

Legislative Updates

Federal Legislation: Sens. Marco Rubio, R-Florida, and Chris Van Hollen, D-Maryland, introduced an updated version of their Defending Elections from Threats by Establishing Redlines Act (DETER Act), which they said promises “swift and severe consequences” to Russia and other “foreign actors” if they attack U.S. political candidates, campaigns, or voting infrastructure. Last year’s version of the bill, S. 2785, made it out of the Senate Judiciary Committee, but not through the full Senate.

Arizona: The House has approved a bill that would place new restrictions on emergency voting. Under the bill, voters would be required to sign statements affirming that they have genuine, unavoidable emergencies that prevent them from voting on Election Day. Falsely claiming an emergency would be a class 4 felony, which carries a penalty of 1.5 to 3 years. Voters casting emergency ballots would also be required to show identification, which is required for in-person voting on Election Day but not for early voting, which verifies voters’ identities by checking their signatures. SB1090 would also give exclusive authority over the locations of emergency voting centers to county boards of supervisors.

Arkansas: Senate Bill 573 is headed to the governor’s desk. If signed into law, it would allow minors convicted as adults to regain their voting rights after completing all terms of their sentence including parole.

California: Assembly Bill 177 has been approved the Assembly Committee on Governmental Organization by a 13-6 vote. Under AB 177, state agencies and schools would be required to give their employees Election Day off from work — and schools would close — so voters can head to the polls. The bill must get approval from the Committee on Appropriations before it moves to the full Assembly and Senate.

Colorado: At least 31 county clerks are opposing House Bill 1278 that, among other things, expands the number of vote centers, changes the hours for vote centers to 6 a.m. to 8 p.m., increases the number of weekend days they must be open and expands the number of ballot dropboxes a county must have.

Florida: The Senate Judiciary Committee has approved a bill that mirrors House legislation attempting to set guidelines for the restoration of voting rights for ex-felons. Like its House counterpart, the bill requires not only that eligible felons complete their prison sentences but also that they satisfy all fines, fees and victim restitution.

Hawaii: The House has approved a series of election-related bills that now return to the Senate for consideration. If the Senate does not agree to amendments made by the House, the bills will be negotiated in conference committees. The approved bills include one that would allow for the use of ranked choice voting in special elections to fill vacant seats, automatic voter registration and mandatory recounts in close races.

Idaho: Gov. Brad Little (R) has signed legislation into law that makes sure Idaho public schools are available as polling places.

Iowa: A senate committee added numerous election law changes to a House bill that would ensure mail-in ballots are counted in a consistent manner across the state. Some of the added changes include a controversial measure that would put students who don’t commit to living in Iowa after graduation on the inactive voter list. The bill would also phase out the bipartisan provisions approved by the House for mail ballot uniformity by 2023.

Although a constitutional amendment to automatically restore the voting rights to ex-felons was approve 95-2 by the House, the bill failed to make “the funnel” in the Senate and will not advance in 2019.

Kansas: The Legislature has approved a bill that would allow counties to move to a vote center system if they choose to. If signed into law, the secretary of state’s office would establish rules and regulations before counties may proceed.

Missouri: The secretary of state’s office has come out in opposition to a bill that would automatically register Show Me state residents to vote when doing business with the department of motor vehicles. “The secretary of state feels that voting is a decision to be taken very seriously,” said Nikolas Shores, legislative liaison for the Missouri secretary of state according to the Missourian. “Not to say that automatic voter registration doesn’t do that, but our concern is that by doing it automatically it may reduce the responsibility that comes with voting.” The bill has bipartisan support in the House committee.

Nevada: Assembly Bill 345 would institute same-day voter registration, allow 17-year-olds who will be 18 at the time of the general election to vote in the primary and extend online voter registration deadlines.

North Carolina: Legislation has been proposed that would provide a fix to the problem surrounding students who wish to use their student IDs as a form of ID in order to cast a ballot.

Pennsylvania: Rep. Rob Matzie (D-Ambridge) has introduced House Bill 1059 voters would be allowed to put themselves on a permanent vote-by-mail list.

Legal Updates

Arizona: Mohave County Attorney Matt Smith is requesting $8K in county fund to investigate allegations of unspecified voter fraud during 2018 municipal elections in Colorado City.

Florida: A coalition of groups has asked a federal judge to require 32 Florida counties to offer Spanish-language ballots and other election materials, the latest move in a legal battle that started last year. The request, filed Friday in federal court in Gainesville, seeks a preliminary injunction requiring Spanish-language ballots and materials for elections starting Aug. 1.

Chief U.S. District Judge Mark Walker has issued a six-page ruling dismissing a lawsuit filed in November against supervisors of elections in an effort to force them to preserve digital ballot images. Walker wrote that provisions in the law “do not indicate Congress’ intent to create a private right or remedy. Instead, the enforcement mechanism appears to rest with the Attorney General of the United States or his representative.”  Walker also rejected constitutional equal-protection arguments raised by the plaintiffs.

Michigan: Say Cheese! Apparently Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson has agreed to settle a lawsuit over a ban on ballot selfies. According to The Associated Press, lawyers won’t talk about the deal until details are filed in federal court on May 8. But a court filing last week suggests there will be an easing of the ban. The state said it wanted to avoid “any confusion” in polling places and wait until after local elections are held on May 7.

New Jersey: A state appellate court has ruled Morris County Clerk Ann Grossi should print bilingual mail ballots in Dover, with a population that is about 70 percent Hispanic. The ruling overturns a ruling last June by Superior Court Judge Stuart Minkowitz. “Considering the statutory scheme as a whole, it is clear that the Legislature has expressed a strong policy interest in protecting Spanish-speaking voters from being disenfranchised,” the unsigned 14-page opinion states.

New Hampshire: The New Hampshire Attorney General’s office has subpoenaed James O’Keefe, the leader of  political activist organization Project Veritas, to testify before a grand jury after video of an Atkinson man admitting to double voting in 2018 was published online.

Oregon: Simone Thrasher, 23 of Salem a former paid circulator registered with Oregon Elections Division, is accused of making false statements, oaths or affidavits on several signature sheets submitted in December 2015.  She also used the personal identification of at least 15 people on the petitions with the intent to deceive and defraud, according to court records.

Virginia: Richard Douglas Dohmen, 68, of James City, was indicted by a grand jury in the Williamsburg-James City County Circuit Court on March 20 on charges of forging public records with the intent to defraud and making a false statement, according to the indictments. He allegedly tried to cast two ballots in October 2018.

Tech Thursday

California: The Los Angeles Times conducted a four-month review of nearly 1,300 pages of documents and interviewed state employees and other individuals who worked on the California Department of Motor Vehicles’ automated voter registration system. According to the paper, the emails present a picture of a project bogged down by personnel clashes, technological hurdles and a persistent belief among those involved that top officials were demanding they make the “motor voter” program operational before the June 5 primary, so that it could boost the number of ballots cast.

Opinions This Week

National Opinions: Voter ID | Get out the Vote | Voter data | HR 1

Arizona: Primary dates | Emergency voting

California: Voting age

Colorado: Election calendar

Connecticut: Automatic voter registration

Florida: Voter access | Unregistered voters | Election legislation | Ex-felon voting rights, II

Illinois: Turnout | McHenry County

Indiana: Turnout

Iowa: College-age voters | Ex-felon voting rights

Kentucky: Election reform

Maine: Election legislation | Ranked choice voting

Minnesota: Election legislation

Missouri: Secretary of state | Poll workers

Montana: Election judges

Nebraska: Vote-by-mail

Nevada: Election consolidations

New York: Polling places

North Carolina: Voter ID

Ohio: Voting equipment

Pennsylvania: Voting machines

Tennessee: Voter ID | Voter registration legislation, II

Texas: Secretary of state

Utah: Ranked choice voting

West Virginia: Election security

Wisconsin: Election security | Recount

Upcoming Events

Election Center Special Workshop —The Election Center will hold a special workshop that will include: Course 9 (Enfranchisement, Enhancement, Enforcement ); Course 10 (Constitution, Courts & Cases to 1965); and Renewal Course 14 (Crisis Management). Where: Virginia Beach. When: April 24-28.

2019 RCV Symposium: Building a Solid Foundation — Join national election experts, election administrators, elected and government officials, and RCV proponents for this 2nd Annual online event focused on “Building a Solid Foundation” for ranked choice voting (RCV). Sessions include: Answers to mischaraterizations of RCV; Firsthand perspective from candidates who have campaigned for RCV contests; How to craft the message to educate voters, policy makers, and others including tips from a three-time Emmy Award-winning corporate filmmaker; And much more! Where: Online. When: April 29-30.

Election Mail Forum One-Day Conference — you are invited to participate in a special one-day Election Mail Forum exclusively at the National Postal Forum, Monday May 6, 2019 at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis Indiana. Come see community leaders showcase election mail. Don’t miss the opportunity to learn and network with Postal Service Leadership, State Election Executives, and election mail preparation vendors. Learn how to Leverage USPS Addressing Products to improve voter roll quality. Come learn about Full Service, STID, IMb— an alternative for “postmark” authentication. When: May 6. Where: Indianapolis.

National Association of Secretaries Of State — The National Association of Secretaries of State will hold their annual summer conference in late June, early July in New Mexico. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registrations. When: June 30-July 3. Where: Santa Fe, New Mexico.

International Association of Government Officials — IGO’s 2019 Annual Conference will be held in Houston, Texas, July 11-17. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of Counties — NACo’s 2019 Annual Conference will be held in Clark County (Las Vegas), Nevada July 11-15, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of State Election Directors — The NASED Summer Conference will be held in Austin, Texas, July 14-16, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

Job Postings This Week

electionlineWeekly publishes election administration job postings each week as a free service to our readers. To have your job listed in the newsletter, please send a copy of the job description, including a web link to mmoretti@electionline.org.  Job postings must be received by 5pm on Wednesday in order to appear in the Thursday newsletter. Listings will run for three weeks or till the deadline listed in the posting.

Deputy Director, Washington Secretary of State’s Office— this position reports to the certification and training program manager and is responsible for overseeing, reviewing and advising county auditors on the federal and state elections laws and the administration of voter registration.  Serves as the lead program specialist in the required election administrator certification program; Certifies state and local election administrators following a series of classes and tests. Participates in the elections training program and county election review program; travels extensively throughout the state to conduct reviews of county elections departments. Participates in the initiative and referenda filing and clearinghouse advisories program. Provide support to Washington State counties on election processes, county WEI systems, and logic and accuracy test program. Salary: $4,275.00 – $5,745.00 Monthly. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Director, Miami County, Ohio Board of Elections— The Miami County Board of Elections is seeking applicants for the position of Director. This position, in cooperation with the Deputy Director, is responsible for overseeing, directing and managing the Board of Elections Office; developing, recommending, and adhering to an annual budget; and conducting fair and impartial elections. Qualified candidates must be affiliated with the Republican Party, reside within Miami County or be able to relocate within 30 days of accepting the position. Applicants must agree to a background check. A candidate for Director of the Board of Elections must possess at least a high school diploma or its equivalency. College level education is desired, and specialized training and/or certification in the various aspects of election administration is to be favored in evaluating applicants. Application: Applicants are requested to demonstrate how they meet the necessary qualifications of the job description when submitting their resume. Interested parties may receive a copy of the job description, evaluation criteria and Ohio Secretary of State Form 307 by visiting the Miami County Board of Elections website at www.miami.ohioboe.com. The website also has the Questionnaire for Prospective Appointment as a Member, Director or Deputy Director of the County Board of Elections (Form No. 307) on it. Any qualified registered Republican may apply by submitting Form 307, along with a current resume, to Miami County Board of Elections, Old Courthouse, 215 West Main Street, Troy, Ohio 45373, or by emailing iridgeway@miamicountyohio.gov. Applications will be accepted until the position is filled.

Director of Elections/General Registrar, Arlington County, Virginia— This is a four-year term position appointed by the Electoral Board with a starting date of July 1, 2019 and an end date of June 30, 2023. The Arlington County Electoral Board is seeking a Director of Elections/General Registrar to provide professional and technical leadership to the Office of Elections and manage the planning, overseeing, and administering of elections in Arlington County. The Director is responsible for ensuring the necessary resources are acquired and in place to maintain the list of registered voters and assure elections are well-prepared and conducted in an accurate, efficient, and transparent manner. Specific duties and responsibilities include: Planning, developing, coordinating, and directing the activities of the Office of Elections, including voter registration; candidate processing and filing; pre-election and Election Day voting; ballot design; equipment programming and testing; poll worker recruitment and training; and voter outreach efforts. Preparing and continuously evaluating the department’s strategic goals and equipment security plan. Supervising permanent and temporary staff of up to 50 individuals, including recruitment, training, scheduling and work assignment, implementation of policies and procedures, performance evaluation, and conflict resolution. Coordinating the administrative processes with the deputy registrar, including but not limited to, budget development and monitoring, County administrative and personnel policies, and technology resources. Consulting and coordinating with County Attorney and Commonwealth’s Attorney as needed on legal issues. Analyzing departmental performance and usage data to make informed projections about future needs, including staffing, space requirements, equipment, and supplies. Providing guidance and technical support to candidates seeking election to local offices, and certifying eligible candidates for elections, including reviewing qualifications and processing of petitions. Managing communication tools including web page, social media, and outreach materials, and ensuring information is accurate and timely. Monitoring legislation introduced at the state and federal levels related to elections and election administration, and providing advice and expertise to legislators as needed. Serving the community and professional organizations as a subject matter expert on elections and election administration; and representing the County at regional, state, and national workshops and conferences. This Director must be self-directed and will have no direct immediate supervisor but will report to and seek guidance from the Arlington County Electoral Board. Additionally, the incumbent will receive guidance and advice from the Virginia Department of Elections as well as from various County departments and is responsible for keeping the Board informed of all relevant matters pertaining to the smooth operation of the department. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Director, Coconino County, Arizona  – Where our opportunities are as vast as our landscapes. Do you have a Bachelor’s degree in public administration and five years progressively responsible administrative or supervisory experience? Do you want to join a dedicated team who is committed to processing and creating public records for our community? The Coconino County Recorder’s Office is seeking an Elections Director. This position coordinates with state, cities, towns and special districts for election services, develops and manages the division’s budget, ensures quality control of all aspects of elections and more. If you are seeking employment satisfaction, a sense of pride in your work and the knowledge that your daily efforts have a direct impact on the community and are in pursuit of a collaborative work environment where diversity is embraced, and accomplishments are celebrated we look forward to seeing your application for our Elections Director. Salary: $87,161 – $100,235 Annually.  Deadline: 04/19/19 at 5PM. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Lead Specialist, Douglas County, Colorado— The Elections Lead Specialist assists in the supervision and coordination of elections operations, staff, and election judges including voter services, mail ballot processing and the conduct of elections. The objective of this position is to perform a variety of functions and diverse support roles on a routine basis. Mail Ballot Processing responsibilities are prioritized over other duties during election cycles, which may increase or decrease dramatically depending on the Elections cycle. In the absence of the Operations Manager, assumes responsibility for front-line functions associated with elections operations. This is a highly visible position requiring exceptional leadership, organizational, and communication skills. Salary: $3,550-$4,438 monthly. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Election Specialist II, Douglas County, Colorado— The Election Specialist II is responsible for routine support services related to temporary employees, training, Voter Service and Polling Centers, mail ballot processing, voter registration, and customer service. This position contributes to the department’s achievement of delivering efficient, transparent, fair and accurate elections as well as performs other projects as assigned. This position requires technical work in a lead role capable of performing a variety of complex tasks, with solving problem abilities, managing multiple competing tasks and prioritizing to maintain a continuous flow of operations and temporary support. This is a visible and crucial position requiring previous elections experience, and exceptional computer, customer service, and communication skills. Please note this position is posted as open until filled, review of applications will begin immediately and continue until a suitable candidate is selected. Salary: $3,214 – $4,017 Monthly. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

GIS Analyst, Yolo County, California— Yolo County ACE (Assessor/Clerk-Recorder/Elections Department) in coordination with the Yolo County General Services department are recruiting for a G.I.S. Analyst. This recruitment is on-going until filled. Submitted applications will be screened continuously, and those applicants meeting the minimum qualifications will move forward to the Screening for Best Qualified process. This position will work inter-departmentally to develop and implement GIS capabilities in Yolo County ACE. GIS is viewed by County Leadership as an innovative enterprise technology that is positioned to help advance County strategic goals. Recent projects include implementing a new enterprise environment, developing an Elections Night Reporting application, developing mobile applications for polling place reporting, and a migration the ESRI Parcel Fabric. The ideal candidate for this position will be a positive, collaborative, solution-focused individual with excellent interpersonal and customer service skills and the ability to handle and manage multiple priorities. If you feel like you meet these qualifications and you would like to join a dynamic organization committed to supporting an environment where employees feel a true sense of passion, purpose and commitment to their job… Yolo County ACE is where you want to be! Our department strives to honor the public’s trust and redefine excellence through innovation and the commitment of a highly-engaged and empowered team. Check out all the exciting things ACE has going on by visiting our social media pages (Facebook: /YoloACE, Instagram: /YoloCoACE, and Twitter: @YoloCoACE). You can be the next Yolo ACE – come and join our team! Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Project Manager, Hart InterCivic— Project Managers at Hart InterCivic are highly motivated “self-starters” who are enthusiastic about providing exceptional customer service. Working with other members of the Professional Services and Operations teams, the Project Manager directs activity, solves problems, and develops lasting and strong relationships with our customers. Hart InterCivic’s unique and industry known culture of innovation, transparency, and customer-centric focus creates an environment where team members will continually grow and be challenged to develop their careers. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Product Manager, Hart InterCivic — as Product Manager, you will join a team that is charged with product planning, design, and execution throughout the lifecycle of Hart’s products, in support of the company’s overall strategy and goals. This includes: gathering, validating, and prioritizing internal and external customer needs; documenting and communicating product and technical requirements; gathering market and competitive intelligence; supporting the certification, sales, and marketing teams. The Product Manager must possess a unique blend of business and technical savvy – with experience in elections technology or other government-oriented products preferred.  To succeed in this role, the ideal candidate must spend time in the market to understand its unique attributes; demonstrate competence with specialized hardware and software; and find innovative solutions for the broader market. The Product Manager plays a key role in helping others to understand the product positioning, key benefits, and target customer, as well as providing advanced subject matter expertise in using the company’s products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Red Team Independent Contractor, Galois— Galois seeks an experienced Red Team Lead with red teaming and/or CTF experience of purported secure systems that include custom hardware to play a pivotal role in fulfilling our mission to make trustworthy critical systems. The role will be responsible for the strategic and tactical direction of a small team dedicated to red team activities. The team is responsible for developing threat simulation services, threat research, structured attack development, vulnerability research and exploit development/testing, scripting and controlled exploitation of hardware and software vulnerabilities. The scope of the position also requires understanding a complex cyber-physical system architecture to develop a precise threat model, red teaming framing, and win conditions for both the DEF CON exercises. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Software Sales Specialist, VOTEC— VOTEC’s Sales Specialist is responsible for creating news sales with prospects and existing clients in targeted areas in the US. We are looking for an election professional comfortable using insight and consultative selling techniques to create interest that offers unique solutions on their operations, which link back to VOTEC’s solutions. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Systems Software Specialist, Yolo County, California — The Elections Branch of Yolo County ACE (Assessor/Clerk-Recorder/Elections Department) in coordination with the Yolo County Information Technology department are recruiting for a Systems Software Specialist. This recruitment is on-going until filled. The Systems Software Specialist class series is responsible for the design, coding, implementation, maintenance and evaluation of computer software. This includes, but is not limited to, operating systems, control systems, proprietary software packages, telecommunications software and database management software. The class also aides in solving problems and achieving the best use of available hardware and software; work with staff to design and implement network segmentation, domain addressing and routing strategies; work with technical staff to ensure effective operations of complex multiple hardware and software configurations; and act as a lead persons over other personnel and program projects and performs related duties as required. If you would like to join a dynamic organization committed to supporting an environment where employees feel a true sense of passion, purpose and commitment to their job… Yolo County ACE is where you want to be! Our department strives to honor the public’s trust and redefine excellence through innovation and the commitment of a highly-engaged and empowered team. Check out all the exciting things ACE has going on by visiting our social media pages (Facebook: /YoloACE, Instagram: /YoloCoACE, and Twitter: @YoloCoACE). You can be the next Yolo ACE – come and join our team! Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Technical Bid Specialist, Scytl — The Technical Bid Specialist is an essential member of the sales team, supporting business development initiatives as well as providing support to the Marketing department. Based in our Tampa Florida, offices, the Technical Bid Specialist is in charge of managing the coordination, completion and handover of tender proposals for our clients and prospects. This is a key position with a great deal of involvement in the sales process and a decisive influence in the achievement of each deal. To be able to perform this task, the Technical Bid Specialist needs to possess a solid technical background, outstanding writing capabilities and proven experience in pre-sales or consulting endeavors, always facing the client and having to put together complex IT proposals or projects. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Training Officer, Collier County, Florida— The purpose of this classification is to provide assistance in the Training & Outreach Department within the Supervisor of Elections office. This position coaches, trains, and educates election workers in accordance with the State of Florida’s election laws and rules. Work involves designing, developing, and delivering multimodal adult learning programs, developing training materials, scheduling training sessions, and recruiting, assigning and evaluating election workers for upcoming election cycles. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Marketplace

electionline provides no guarantees as to the quality of the items being sold and the accuracy of the information provided about the sale items in the Marketplace. Ads are provided directly by sellers and are not verified by electionline. If you have an ad for Marketplace, please email it to: mmoretti@electionline.org

Excess Equipment
Pinal County, Arizona has some excess elections equipment including 19 OS machines and approximately 300 voter booths. If interested, contact Stephanie Cooper, Pinal County elections supervisor at 520-866-7552 or drop her an email at stephanie.cooper@pinalcountyaz.gov.

 

 

Ballot Scanners
Ballot reader. $500. Buyer will be responsible for pick and shipping to buyer’s location. Contact Wilfred Cochico, purchasing officer City of Lakewood: 562-866-9771 ext. 2640 or via email: WCochico@lakewoodcity.org.

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In Focus This Week

April 4, 2019

April 4, 2019

In Focus This Week

Fresh from the “Kitchen”: FVAP’s New Standardized UOCAVA Data

By Doug Chapin
Fors Marsh Group

One of the biggest changes I have experienced in my move to the Elections Research team at Fors Marsh Group is the extent to which I get a close-up look at key research before it’s released. As I’ve told several people, it’s like the #electiongeek equivalent of transitioning from foodie to sous chef – going from a connoisseur of fine data to someone intimately familiar with the process of preparing and sharing it with the community.

That feeling is especially strong with regard to a new research note our team developed, in partnership with the Federal Voting Assistance Program (FVAP) and the Council of State Governments’ Overseas Voting Initiative (CSG OVI), looking at how transactional-level data about the Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act (UOCAVA) voting process illuminates key trends in military and overseas voting.

That data, which was produced starting in 2016 as part of FVAP’s efforts to seek new and different ways to assess the UOCAVA voting experience, looks past the summary jurisdiction-level data reported in Section B of the Election Assistance Commission’s Election Administration and Voting Survey (EAVS) to focus on voter-level transactions associated with requesting and returning a ballot. Participating states and jurisdictions (14 in 2016) produce data in accordance with an EAVS Section B (ESB) standard which, when combined with other data about the voting process, allows for rich and fascinating observations about how well (or not) the UOCAVA process works.

Thus, for example, using the 2016 ESB data, the new research note finds that:

  • About two in three ballot requests (65%) were received at least 45 days before the election;
  • About one in 25 (4%) waited until the week before the election;
  • Voters who received their ballots earlier were more slightly more likely to return them with less chance of being rejected for inaccuracy or lateness; and, most interesting
  • Voters who received their ballots by mail were slightly more likely to return them than voters receiving ballots electronically.
  • You can see the relationship between days until the election and successful return of ballots in the following graphs – first, the likelihood of timely return:

Obviously, there are many other factors involved in the likelihood of timely return and acceptance of UOCAVA ballots – including who the affected voters are and why they choose when and how to request and return ballots – but these data provide an insight into the military and overseas voting process that deserves attention from election officials and advocates alike. It’s consistent with an overall trend in the field to seek greater standardization of election data transfer; an exciting new approach that I know FVAP (as well as those of us at Fors Marsh and CSG OVI) are interested in continuing to explore.

We were honored to be a part of this process – which could not have happened without the support of FVAP’s David Beirne and focus and dedication of CSG’s Jared Marcotte and Fors Marsh’s Colin MacFarlane – and we look forward to learning more as the ESB data pool expands in 2018 and beyond!

Bottom line: this election data is delicious. We’ll make more.

2018 HAVA Spending Report

EAC Releases First Expenditure Report Detailing Impact of 2018 HAVA Funds

The U.S. Election Assistance Commission (EAC) today released a Grant Expenditure Report for Fiscal Year 2018 detailing how states and territories have spent $3,628,946,231 in federal funds made available through the Help America Vote Act (HAVA) from the time the legislation was ratified on October 29, 2002 until September 30, 2018. The report also examines how states and territories were able to begin spending an additional $380 million in 2018 HAVA Funds to great effect within just the first six months of those funds being made available to them.

From when the Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2018 was signed into law on March 23, 2018 through September 30, 2018, states reported spending 8.1 percent of the $380 million allocated and have outlined plans to significantly increase spending ahead of the 2020 election. Since the initial election reform grants were made in the early 2000s States and territories report total expenditures of $3,400,037,361, or 85 percent of total federal funds and accrued interest, available under Sections 101, 102 and 251 of HAVA.

The EAC worked to efficiently and responsibly award the 2018 HAVA Funds, which were made available less than seven months before the Midterm Elections. To access the funds, eligible states and territories provided a budget and a state narrative outlining plans for how those funds will be used. States could technically begin spending funds once they received their notice of grant award on April 17, 2018. However, most states waited until funds had been transferred to their state election accounts and many states first had to get state legislative approval before spending funds.

“Last year, with the 2018 Midterm Elections fast approaching, election officials across the nation rose to the occasion, spending when appropriate, but also creating long-term multi-faceted plans to invest these vital funds in meaningful election administration improvements,” said EAC Chairwoman Christy McCormick.

“The 2018 HAVA Funds have been used to make a tangible difference in the efficiency, security, accessibility and integrity of American elections. Funds supported an array of activities, including innovations in cybersecurity for voter registration systems, procurement of voting equipment, and improvements to post-election audit procedures. That such an impact has already been felt by these funds is a shining example of the benefit of federal-regional partnerships and the tireless work of election administrators across the country. I am pleased the EAC can highlight those efforts in today’s report,” McCormick noted.

The 2018 HAVA Funds were used by states to improve their election systems in a number of innovative ways, including: 2

Arkansas has spent almost all of its funds already to establish cost-sharing agreements with the counties to replace aging voting equipment. The acquisitions ensure that a paper trail for ballots cast is present in all Arkansas counties and almost 70 percent of Arkansas voters are voting on a new integrated election equipment system. Of the initial $4,724,225 in funds available through federal appropriations, the required state match and interest, as of Sept. 30, 2018, Arkansas had only $44,305 in funds remaining.

Colorado plans to use its $6,342,979 in 2018 HAVA Funds to enhance technology and security in the state’s election process, including work to improve risk-limiting audits and other audits of election-related systems in 2019 and beyond.

Delaware plans to purchase new voting equipment, including a new voting system that has a voter verifiable paper audit trail, an absentee voting system and an Election Management/Voter Registration system that will move elections from the state’s aging mainframe.

Indiana helped counties implement multi-factor authentication systems for accessing voting equipment and conducted cybersecurity training for all county officials during the state’s annual election administrators conference. Going forward, the state plans to acquire additional election technology, implement e-poll book vendor network security enhancements, deploy auditable voting systems and perform election night reporting security enhancements.

Iowa conducted cybersecurity training seminars for county auditors and staff and participated in a pilot program for a self-assessment cybersecurity tool. The Secretary of State’s Office also implemented two-factor authentication for access to the statewide voter registration system, purchased additional security protections for the state’s election night reporting system and partnered with the Department of Homeland Security to conduct two tabletop exercises.

Massachusetts made network security upgrades to its voter registration system, hired a network security engineer and conducted security training for election staff. The Secretary of State’s Office also plans to use funds to acquire new voting equipment, upgrade the state’s voter registration system and improve the cybersecurity of its election system.

New Mexico hired a full-time IT security and compliance administrator whose responsibilities include implementing additional security practices to safeguard sensitive data and election systems, and protecting against cyber vulnerabilities. The state also purchased scan tabulation systems that feature ballot image capture and audit capabilities.

Rhode Island purchased a database platform for its Centralized Voter Registration system that encrypts all the data. The state also purchased a system for the Centralized Voter Registration System that monitors the system, protects it from ransomware, and protects sensitive data in the system. In addition, the state purchased a system that provides real time analysis of security threats, sends alerts if issues are detected and quarantines devices if there is abnormal activity.

Vermont used a portion of its 2018 HAVA Funds to replace and upgrade voting equipment, implement post-election audits, mitigate cyber vulnerabilities and provide required cybersecurity training for all town and city clerks in the spring of 2018, prior to the 2018 Midterm Elections.

Washington spent part of its 2018 HAVA Funds on cybersecurity equipment. The state implemented advanced firewall protection for its centralized election system and installed an advanced threat detection and prevention appliance. The state also acquired a database storage device on the Voter Registration system that has back-up and recovery capabilities. All equipment and software, with the exception of the database storage device, was in place prior to the November 2018 election.

Washington, D.C. has used $399,400 of its funds to purchase new voting equipment and hire additional staff to increase the number of early voting centers across the District of Columbia, to train election officials and to produce voter education materials. The District of Columbia plans to use its remaining 2018 HAVA Funds to acquire additional equipment, increase maintenance and support, hire a full time cybersecurity expert, hire and train additional poll workers, continue voter education and outreach, and invest in technology to improve all aspects of voter registration and election administration.

A brief summary of how each state and territory has used their HAVA funds is available within the FY18 Grant Expenditure Report. States are required to submit another financial report in December 2019.

More detailed reports from states and territories outlining how they have, or are planning to spend, their 2018 HAVA Funds can be found at this link.

Federal-State Updates

The U.S. House Committee on Oversight and Reform is currently investigating three states over their elections practices. There is the ongoing look into what happened in Georgia during the 2018 Midterm elections and now the committee is also looking into Texas’ list maintenance and voter suppression in Ford County, Kansas. In letters sent to Texas officials, Reps. Elijah Cummings, the Democratic chair of the Committee on Oversight and Reform, and Jamie Raskin, D-Maryland, requested documents and communications from the secretary of state and the state’s attorney general related to the review through which state officials tagged almost 100,000 registered voters as suspect voters. The committee is looking into Ford County, Kansas’ decision to move Dodge City’s only polling place about a mile outside the city.

Election News This Week

While more and more localities are considering ranked choice voting, half of the six Utah cities that were planning to pilot the voting system this year are now backing out of the pilot citing issues with implementation and voter education. By a 4 to 1 vote, Lehi became the latest city to bail on the pilot. “We’ve trailblazed a lot of different things,” Lehi City Councilman Mike Southwick said at the council meeting according to The Salt Lake Tribune. “I’m just not convinced that this is something that we want to be in front of. I wouldn’t mind having another city being a guinea pig for it.” According to the paper, the only cities remaining in the 2019 pilot are Salem, Payson and Vineyard.

This week, the U.S. Election Assistance Commission released two new language accessibility resources. The EAC Clearinghouse Brief on Language Accessibility aggregates existing resources on language accessibility and aims to help election officials and other election stakeholders understand language assistance requirements under the Voting Rights Act and how other jurisdictions have approached serving voters with language needs. The Five New Translations of the National Voter Registration Form provides the NVRA form in Arabic, French, Hatian Creole, Portuguese and Russian. The new languages reflect the five most populous language communities in the U.S., among those with limited English proficiency and for whom the form was not previously translated.

Summer reading season is almost upon us and Professor Josh Douglas has election geeks covered with Vote for US: How to Take Back Our Elections and Change the Future of Voting (Prometheus Books). Douglas tells the surprising and uplifting stories of numerous Democracy Champions who are finding ways to improve our election processes. The book offers the tale of how everyday Americans are working to take back our democracy, one community at a time, by expanding voter eligibility, easing registration rules, making voting more convenient, enhancing accessibility, taking back redistricting, fixing campaign finance, transforming civics education, and more.

Personnel News: Bev Clarno, former House speaker, has been appointed to serve as Oregon’s new secretary of state. Crystal Rogers has been named the new Hawkins County, Tennessee elections administrator. Barbara Luth has been appointed chief registrar and chairperson of the Forsyth County, Georgia Board of Registration and Elections. Charlottesville, Virginia Registrar Rosanna Bencoach plans to step down in July. Carolyn Cox and Judy Whitehall have been named to the Rutherford County, Tennessee election commission.

In Memoriam: Laura Wooten, America’s longest known poll worker died on March 24. She was 98. Wooten, who worked at Princeton University as a food services employee at the time of her death, served as a poll worker for 79 years. Gov. Phil Murphy described Wooten as “one of the great moral leaders of our state & nation, promoting voting rights and democracy year after year.” Wooten served in local, primary and general elections and told NBC News in November 2018 while working at the polls, “Democracy is just a beautiful, beautiful thing.” Wooten, a mother of five, is survived by 16 grandchildren, 31 great-grandchildren and one great-great grandchild.

Research and Report Summaries

The Brennan Center released a guidebook on election technology procurement last month. Based on interviews with election officials and cybersecurity experts, the report, A Procurement Guide for Better Election Cybersecurity, recommends seven key areas of focus: source code disclosure; robust security incident reporting; patching/software updates; security assessments/audits; regular penetration testing; risk-limiting audit support; and foreign nexus disclosure.

The Texas Civil Rights Project released a report last month that summarized findings from its election protection program monitoring the 2018 midterm elections in Texas. The report finds that voter registration in Texas rose to 79 percent of the citizen voting age population, the highest percentage in the state since 2004. The study finds that turnout in 2018 was 53 percent, representing an increase of 20 percent since the 2014 midterms, the sixth highest turnout increase in the nation. The report documents issues reported to the election protection coalition, including late poll openings, long lines at polling places, polling place problems on college campuses, early registration deadlines, noncompliance with the National Voter Registration Act, provisional ballot problems, voter intimidation, and voting machine malfunctions.

(Research and Report Summaries are written by David Kuennen.)

Legislative Updates

Federal Legislation: Senate Democrats have introduced their version of HR 1.

Arizona: Gov. Greg Ducey has signed a bill into law that will give voters up to five days after an election to cure their signatures on mail ballots.

California: Assemblyman Evan Low (D-San Diego) has introduced a bill to make Election Day a state holiday in California. If approved, all state employees would have the day off and schools and state-run colleges and universities would be closed.

Colorado: State Sen. Jessie Danielson has introduced a bill that would allow for the use ballot marking software for voters who are visually impaired.

Georgia: Gov. Brian Kemp has signed House Bill 316 into law. Under the new law, the state will purchase new touch-screen voting machines with a paper ballot receipt.

Iowa: By a 95-2 vote, the Iowa House voted in favor of a constitutional amendment that would automatically restore voting rights to Iowans with felony convictions after they complete their sentence.

According to the Des Moines Register, a proposal that would have prevented the use of state-owned buildings for satellite voting sites won’t move forward this legislative session. However, additional aspects of the original legislation including uniform poll closing times, and a controversial provision that would unregister college students who don’t commit to living in Iowa after graduation, are still moving forward.

Kansas: Lawmakers reached a deal to bundle a handful of election-related bills, including one that would require county clerks to attempt to contact voters whose advance ballots lack a valid signature.

Maryland: Sen. Cheryl Kagan sponsored a bill that would have allowed Montgomery County to amend its system of voting to a ranked choice system in local elections, where voters mark their ballots by ranking the candidates in order of preference. The bill didn’t advance past the Ways and Means Committee, but Kagan pointed to the fact that it passed the county’s delegation as a sign that there is “growing momentum” for the alternative method of voting. “We’ve got time because we’re looking at 2022, and next year’s only 2020,” Kagan told Bethesda Magazine.

Also in Maryland, House Bill 569 would repeal the requirement that a local board of elections employee be a registered voter in Maryland. They would still have to be a registered voter, but could be registered to vote and live in another state.

Missouri: The House has given preliminary approval to a bill that would change state law to give the secretary of state more power to investigate voter fraud and other election law irregularities.

Nevada: Under Assembly Bill 431, full voting rights would be restored to felons upon their release from prison.

Tennessee: Under HB1079 and SB971 third-party groups leading voter registration efforts must undergo training and ma potentially face finds for submitting too many incomplete forms.

Also in Tennessee, a bill making its way through the House would allow the state’s four largest cities to decide whether or not to conduct local, nonpartisan elections using instant runoff voting.

Legal Updates

U.S. Supreme Court: The U.S. Supreme Court will weigh-in on a year’s long case out of New York and what is considered timely for the filing of a lawsuit.

California: The 13th Court of Appeals has overturned a judge’s ruling that voided the mayoral runoff election in Mission in which city councilman Armando O’cana ousted longtime mayor Norberto Salinas. The O’Cana campaign was accused of manipulating mail-in ballots and bribing voters.

Also in California, San Francisco Superior Court Judge Ethan Schulman has ruled that Secretary of State Alex Padilla was not complying fully with the National Voter Registration Act of 1993. Elections officials were ordered to expand voter registration throughout the state to county welfare offices and student financial aid centers.

Texas: At a meeting with Latin American advocates, Secretary of State David Whitely said that a deal to settle several lawsuits brought by civil rights groups over the state’s voter list maintenance program is about 99 percent done.

Tech Thursday

Pennsylvania: A review of the Luzerne County voter rolls found that quite a few of the county’s voters are well over 100…although they really aren’t. When the county switched a new voter database in 1998, due to some technical issues, some voters birth years had to be listed as 1900. That same switch in database also is why it appears that 105,718 voters all registered on the same day in 1998. The incorrect birthdates should have been caught during routine maintenance of the voter rolls, but neither the voters nor the elections office caught the discrepancy.

Opinions This Week

National Opinions: Voting rights | Voters with disabilities | Ex-felon voting rights

Arizona: Ranked choice voting

California: Election Day holiday

Colorado: Ballot postage

Delaware: Same day registration

Florida: Ex-felon voting rights, II | Voter fraud

Illinois: Voter access

Iowa: Ex-felon voting rights, II

Kansas: Secretary of state

Louisiana: Turnout

Missouri: Primaries

Nevada: Turnout

New Hampshire: Ranked choice voting

New Jersey: Ex-felon voting rights

New Mexico: Voter registration changes

New York: Early voting | NYCBOE

North Carolina: Voter ID, II | Election fraud

Oregon: Vote-by-mail | Secretary of state

Pennsylvania: Voting equipment, II, III

Tennessee: Voter registration legislation

Texas: Voting machines | Election legislation | Ranked choice voting

Upcoming Events

Election Center Special Workshop —The Election Center will hold a special workshop that will include: Course 9 (Enfranchisement, Enhancement, Enforcement ); Course 10 (Constitution, Courts & Cases to 1965); and Renewal Course 14 (Crisis Management). Where: Virginia Beach. When: April 24-28.

2019 RCV Symposium: Building a Solid Foundation — Join national election experts, election administrators, elected and government officials, and RCV proponents for this 2nd Annual online event focused on “Building a Solid Foundation” for ranked choice voting (RCV). Sessions include: Answers to mischaraterizations of RCV; Firsthand perspective from candidates who have campaigned for RCV contests; How to craft the message to educate voters, policy makers, and others including tips from a three-time Emmy Award-winning corporate filmmaker; And much more! Where: Online. When: April 29-30.

Election Mail Forum One-Day Conference — you are invited to participate in a special one-day Election Mail Forum exclusively at the National Postal Forum, Monday May 6, 2019 at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis Indiana. Come see community leaders showcase election mail. Don’t miss the opportunity to learn and network with Postal Service Leadership, State Election Executives, and election mail preparation vendors. Learn how to Leverage USPS Addressing Products to improve voter roll quality. Come learn about Full Service, STID, IMb— an alternative for “postmark” authentication. When: May 6. Where: Indianapolis.

National Association of Secretaries Of State — The National Association of Secretaries of State will hold their annual summer conference in late June, early July in New Mexico. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registrations. When: June 30-July 3. Where: Santa Fe, New Mexico.

International Association of Government Officials — IGO’s 2019 Annual Conference will be held in Houston, Texas, July 11-17. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of Counties — NACo’s 2019 Annual Conference will be held in Clark County (Las Vegas), Nevada July 11-15, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of State Election Directors — The NASED Summer Conference will be held in Austin, Texas, July 14-16, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

Job Postings This Week

electionlineWeekly publishes election administration job postings each week as a free service to our readers. To have your job listed in the newsletter, please send a copy of the job description, including a web link to mmoretti@electionline.org.  Job postings must be received by 5pm on Wednesday in order to appear in the Thursday newsletter. Listings will run for three weeks or till the deadline listed in the posting.

Clerk of the Board/Elections Director, Santa Cruz County, Arizona — Under the direction of the Santa Cruz County Board of Supervisors and guidance from the Santa Cruz County Manager, performs statutory duties of the Clerk of the Board pursuant to ARS 11-241 and other statutory duties, to include preparing, publishing and posting the agenda for the Board of Supervisor meetings.  Under limited supervision, performs work of considerable difficulty to plan, organize, coordinate, direct and manage all activities of the Santa Cruz County Elections Department in compliance with applicable laws, rules and regulations. This is an at-will position. Plans, organizes, coordinates, directs and manages all activities of the Santa Cruz County Elections Department in compliance with applicable laws, rules, and regulations; oversees daily operations and programing; develops and administers departmental budget and oversees expenditures, develops and administers training and education for election staff and volunteers.  Develops and implements procedural and technical improvements as they relate to elections; ensures quality control of all aspects of election from ballot production to public information; manages projects, coordinates with other county/state departments and outside vendors. Salary: $69,186. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Deputy Director, Washington Secretary of State’s Office— this position reports to the certification and training program manager and is responsible for overseeing, reviewing and advising county auditors on the federal and state elections laws and the administration of voter registration.  Serves as the lead program specialist in the required election administrator certification program; Certifies state and local election administrators following a series of classes and tests. Participates in the elections training program and county election review program; travels extensively throughout the state to conduct reviews of county elections departments. Participates in the initiative and referenda filing and clearinghouse advisories program. Provide support to Washington State counties on election processes, county WEI systems, and logic and accuracy test program. Salary: $4,275.00 – $5,745.00 Monthly. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Director, Miami County, Ohio Board of Elections— The Miami County Board of Elections is seeking applicants for the position of Director. This position, in cooperation with the Deputy Director, is responsible for overseeing, directing and managing the Board of Elections Office; developing, recommending, and adhering to an annual budget; and conducting fair and impartial elections. Qualified candidates must be affiliated with the Republican Party, reside within Miami County or be able to relocate within 30 days of accepting the position. Applicants must agree to a background check. A candidate for Director of the Board of Elections must possess at least a high school diploma or its equivalency. College level education is desired, and specialized training and/or certification in the various aspects of election administration is to be favored in evaluating applicants. Application: Applicants are requested to demonstrate how they meet the necessary qualifications of the job description when submitting their resume. Interested parties may receive a copy of the job description, evaluation criteria and Ohio Secretary of State Form 307 by visiting the Miami County Board of Elections website at www.miami.ohioboe.com. The website also has the Questionnaire for Prospective Appointment as a Member, Director or Deputy Director of the County Board of Elections (Form No. 307) on it. Any qualified registered Republican may apply by submitting Form 307, along with a current resume, to Miami County Board of Elections, Old Courthouse, 215 West Main Street, Troy, Ohio 45373, or by emailing iridgeway@miamicountyohio.gov. Applications will be accepted until the position is filled.

Director of Elections/General Registrar, Arlington County, Virginia— This is a four-year term position appointed by the Electoral Board with a starting date of July 1, 2019 and an end date of June 30, 2023. The Arlington County Electoral Board is seeking a Director of Elections/General Registrar to provide professional and technical leadership to the Office of Elections and manage the planning, overseeing, and administering of elections in Arlington County. The Director is responsible for ensuring the necessary resources are acquired and in place to maintain the list of registered voters and assure elections are well-prepared and conducted in an accurate, efficient, and transparent manner. Specific duties and responsibilities include: Planning, developing, coordinating, and directing the activities of the Office of Elections, including voter registration; candidate processing and filing; pre-election and Election Day voting; ballot design; equipment programming and testing; poll worker recruitment and training; and voter outreach efforts. Preparing and continuously evaluating the department’s strategic goals and equipment security plan. Supervising permanent and temporary staff of up to 50 individuals, including recruitment, training, scheduling and work assignment, implementation of policies and procedures, performance evaluation, and conflict resolution. Coordinating the administrative processes with the deputy registrar, including but not limited to, budget development and monitoring, County administrative and personnel policies, and technology resources. Consulting and coordinating with County Attorney and Commonwealth’s Attorney as needed on legal issues. Analyzing departmental performance and usage data to make informed projections about future needs, including staffing, space requirements, equipment, and supplies. Providing guidance and technical support to candidates seeking election to local offices, and certifying eligible candidates for elections, including reviewing qualifications and processing of petitions. Managing communication tools including web page, social media, and outreach materials, and ensuring information is accurate and timely. Monitoring legislation introduced at the state and federal levels related to elections and election administration, and providing advice and expertise to legislators as needed. Serving the community and professional organizations as a subject matter expert on elections and election administration; and representing the County at regional, state, and national workshops and conferences. This Director must be self-directed and will have no direct immediate supervisor but will report to and seek guidance from the Arlington County Electoral Board. Additionally, the incumbent will receive guidance and advice from the Virginia Department of Elections as well as from various County departments and is responsible for keeping the Board informed of all relevant matters pertaining to the smooth operation of the department. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Director, Coconino County, Arizona  – Where our opportunities are as vast as our landscapes. Do you have a Bachelor’s degree in public administration and five years progressively responsible administrative or supervisory experience? Do you want to join a dedicated team who is committed to processing and creating public records for our community? The Coconino County Recorder’s Office is seeking an Elections Director. This position coordinates with state, cities, towns and special districts for election services, develops and manages the division’s budget, ensures quality control of all aspects of elections and more. If you are seeking employment satisfaction, a sense of pride in your work and the knowledge that your daily efforts have a direct impact on the community and are in pursuit of a collaborative work environment where diversity is embraced, and accomplishments are celebrated we look forward to seeing your application for our Elections Director. Salary: $87,161 – $100,235 Annually.  Deadline: 04/19/19 at 5PM. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Lead Specialist, Douglas County, Colorado— The Elections Lead Specialist assists in the supervision and coordination of elections operations, staff, and election judges including voter services, mail ballot processing and the conduct of elections. The objective of this position is to perform a variety of functions and diverse support roles on a routine basis. Mail Ballot Processing responsibilities are prioritized over other duties during election cycles, which may increase or decrease dramatically depending on the Elections cycle. In the absence of the Operations Manager, assumes responsibility for front-line functions associated with elections operations. This is a highly visible position requiring exceptional leadership, organizational, and communication skills. Salary: $3,550-$4,438 monthly. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Election Specialist II, Douglas County, Colorado— The Election Specialist II is responsible for routine support services related to temporary employees, training, Voter Service and Polling Centers, mail ballot processing, voter registration, and customer service. This position contributes to the department’s achievement of delivering efficient, transparent, fair and accurate elections as well as performs other projects as assigned. This position requires technical work in a lead role capable of performing a variety of complex tasks, with solving problem abilities, managing multiple competing tasks and prioritizing to maintain a continuous flow of operations and temporary support. This is a visible and crucial position requiring previous elections experience, and exceptional computer, customer service, and communication skills. Please note this position is posted as open until filled, review of applications will begin immediately and continue until a suitable candidate is selected. Salary: $3,214 – $4,017 Monthly. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

GIS Analyst, Yolo County, California— Yolo County ACE (Assessor/Clerk-Recorder/Elections Department) in coordination with the Yolo County General Services department are recruiting for a G.I.S. Analyst. This recruitment is on-going until filled. Submitted applications will be screened continuously, and those applicants meeting the minimum qualifications will move forward to the Screening for Best Qualified process. This position will work inter-departmentally to develop and implement GIS capabilities in Yolo County ACE. GIS is viewed by County Leadership as an innovative enterprise technology that is positioned to help advance County strategic goals. Recent projects include implementing a new enterprise environment, developing an Elections Night Reporting application, developing mobile applications for polling place reporting, and a migration the ESRI Parcel Fabric. The ideal candidate for this position will be a positive, collaborative, solution-focused individual with excellent interpersonal and customer service skills and the ability to handle and manage multiple priorities. If you feel like you meet these qualifications and you would like to join a dynamic organization committed to supporting an environment where employees feel a true sense of passion, purpose and commitment to their job… Yolo County ACE is where you want to be! Our department strives to honor the public’s trust and redefine excellence through innovation and the commitment of a highly-engaged and empowered team. Check out all the exciting things ACE has going on by visiting our social media pages (Facebook: /YoloACE, Instagram: /YoloCoACE, and Twitter: @YoloCoACE). You can be the next Yolo ACE – come and join our team! Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Project Manager, Hart InterCivic— Project Managers at Hart InterCivic are highly motivated “self-starters” who are enthusiastic about providing exceptional customer service. Working with other members of the Professional Services and Operations teams, the Project Manager directs activity, solves problems, and develops lasting and strong relationships with our customers. Hart InterCivic’s unique and industry known culture of innovation, transparency, and customer-centric focus creates an environment where team members will continually grow and be challenged to develop their careers. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Product Manager, Hart InterCivic — as Product Manager, you will join a team that is charged with product planning, design, and execution throughout the lifecycle of Hart’s products, in support of the company’s overall strategy and goals. This includes: gathering, validating, and prioritizing internal and external customer needs; documenting and communicating product and technical requirements; gathering market and competitive intelligence; supporting the certification, sales, and marketing teams. The Product Manager must possess a unique blend of business and technical savvy – with experience in elections technology or other government-oriented products preferred.  To succeed in this role, the ideal candidate must spend time in the market to understand its unique attributes; demonstrate competence with specialized hardware and software; and find innovative solutions for the broader market. The Product Manager plays a key role in helping others to understand the product positioning, key benefits, and target customer, as well as providing advanced subject matter expertise in using the company’s products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Systems Software Specialist, Yolo County, California — The Elections Branch of Yolo County ACE (Assessor/Clerk-Recorder/Elections Department) in coordination with the Yolo County Information Technology department are recruiting for a Systems Software Specialist. This recruitment is on-going until filled. The Systems Software Specialist class series is responsible for the design, coding, implementation, maintenance and evaluation of computer software. This includes, but is not limited to, operating systems, control systems, proprietary software packages, telecommunications software and database management software. The class also aides in solving problems and achieving the best use of available hardware and software; work with staff to design and implement network segmentation, domain addressing and routing strategies; work with technical staff to ensure effective operations of complex multiple hardware and software configurations; and act as a lead persons over other personnel and program projects and performs related duties as required. If you would like to join a dynamic organization committed to supporting an environment where employees feel a true sense of passion, purpose and commitment to their job… Yolo County ACE is where you want to be! Our department strives to honor the public’s trust and redefine excellence through innovation and the commitment of a highly-engaged and empowered team. Check out all the exciting things ACE has going on by visiting our social media pages (Facebook: /YoloACE, Instagram: /YoloCoACE, and Twitter: @YoloCoACE). You can be the next Yolo ACE – come and join our team! Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Technical Bid Specialist, Scytl — The Technical Bid Specialist is an essential member of the sales team, supporting business development initiatives as well as providing support to the Marketing department. Based in our Tampa Florida, offices, the Technical Bid Specialist is in charge of managing the coordination, completion and handover of tender proposals for our clients and prospects. This is a key position with a great deal of involvement in the sales process and a decisive influence in the achievement of each deal. To be able to perform this task, the Technical Bid Specialist needs to possess a solid technical background, outstanding writing capabilities and proven experience in pre-sales or consulting endeavors, always facing the client and having to put together complex IT proposals or projects. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Training Officer, Collier County, Florida— The purpose of this classification is to provide assistance in the Training & Outreach Department within the Supervisor of Elections office. This position coaches, trains, and educates election workers in accordance with the State of Florida’s election laws and rules. Work involves designing, developing, and delivering multimodal adult learning programs, developing training materials, scheduling training sessions, and recruiting, assigning and evaluating election workers for upcoming election cycles. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Marketplace

electionline provides no guarantees as to the quality of the items being sold and the accuracy of the information provided about the sale items in the Marketplace. Ads are provided directly by sellers and are not verified by electionline. If you have an ad for Marketplace, please email it to: mmoretti@electionline.org

Excess Equipment
Pinal County, Arizona has some excess elections equipment including 19 OS machines and approximately 300 voter booths. If interested, contact Stephanie Cooper, Pinal County elections supervisor at 520-866-7552 or drop her an email at stephanie.cooper@pinalcountyaz.gov.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ballot Scanners
Ballot reader. $500. Buyer will be responsible for pick and shipping to buyer’s location. Contact Wilfred Cochico, purchasing officer City of Lakewood: 562-866-9771 ext. 2640 or via email: WCochico@lakewoodcity.org.

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In Focus This Week

March 28, 2019

March 28, 2019

In Focus This Week

Contra Costa County Elections’ star turn on ‘reality TV’
Broadcasting live on Facebook is an opportunity for more transparency

By The Contra Costa County Elections Team

The tension was high as all eyes focused on a single die. A tied election hung in the balance.

Larry Enos, a two-term incumbent in a tiny irrigation district, needed to roll at least 14 to keep his seat. He took the 20-sided die and calmly tossed it onto the table. As the final roll came to a stop, spectators looked on in anticipation. Our staff confirmed the die showed a 20, securing Enos’ win.

This made-for-TV moment played out in our office lobby and was simultaneously broadcast on Facebook Live for all to see. It was gripping reality TV. It’s not surprise that it’s our most viewed video to date since the spectacle of the event—breaking a tie!—and the unique Dungeons and Dragons die drew national and international news coverage.

Armed with just smartphones and tablets, our office crafted and shared a range of visuals showing our November 2018 preparation and post-election canvass activities. The concerted and creative use of videos and images helped our messages reach more people and made it easier for them to understand the process.

“Our goal is to provide more avenues to showcase how we do business,” said Joe Canciamilla, Contra Costa County Registrar of Voters. “Videos and photos provide information to residents in a way that is simple to follow.”

Last fall, our office highlighted real-time activities, from a time-lapse of vote by mail ballot extraction to a video of ballots being ironed to flatten creased timing marks.

In addition to presenting the daily work, our posts could be whimsical or fun, and included superheroes, emojis, and GIFs. Tone was important and varied based on the message. For example, results updates were brief and clear, but other posts could be an entertaining exchange with colleagues. These platforms allow us to make personal connections with voters. Unlike the expected formality of a press release, our personality can shine through, which helps humanize the work.

“We wanted to liven it up and give those following our social media accounts something to look forward to,” Canciamilla said. “One of the best parts is that our team could show their family and friends exactly what they were doing. It became a source of pride for them.”

While we welcome all to observe the process, a limited number of people actually visit our facilities during an election. Still, voters want to know what happens to their ballot after they drop it in the mail or leave the polling place.

“We’ve always tried to be transparent, but in the past this kind of information has been limited to those who are aggressively hunting for it. Now, with these visual platforms, everyone can understand what’s happening as it’s happening,” Canciamilla said.

One of our most popular posts showed the rainbow of vote by mail ballots we received from various jurisdictions and explained how we return them to the correct California county for counting.

Community members offered kudos and praise for our efforts to pull back the curtain and show the inner workings of the democratic process.

We initially expanded our use of social media in 2015 and began using videos to share information, including livestreaming poll worker activities on Election Day.  Our YouTube channel hosts everything from a movie trailer for a special election to a training video on late-breaking poll worker procedures. Our latest production is an invitation to fall in love with vote by mail.

We’ll continue to explore what audiences are interested in knowing more about and will keep an eye on the most effective social media platforms to deliver the message.

“We feel that we’ve only scratched the surface as far as what we can do. We’re optimistic that we can continue to improve and use innovative ways to tell our story,” Canciamilla said.

(Editor’s Note: This week’s story marks the fourth and for now final piece in our series on the important role that communications play in an elections office. Previously we’ve heard from Alton Dillard of the Denver County Clerk and Recorder’s Office on Communications 101, Kurt Sampsel of the Center for Technology and Civic Life on What makes an effective elections website and a piece on the importance of branding.  In the not-so-distant past we’ve also covered effective uses of social media. Elections officials wear a lot of hats and not all of them are fortunate enough to have a dedicated comms staff person so our hope with this series has been to give you some easy (and hopefully free) tips on how to effectively communicate with the public and the press.)

VVSG Public Comments

The U.S. Election Assistance Commission’s (EAC) four sitting Commissioners unanimously voted to publish the proposed Voluntary Voting System Guidelines 2.0 (VVSG) Principles and Guidelines in the Federal Register for a 90 day public comment period, after which comments and feedback on the proposed document will be compiled and presented to the Commissioners for discussion and consideration.

“Today’s unanimous vote demonstrates the Commissioners’ shared commitment to taking this next important step in consideration of the proposed VVSG 2.0 Principles and Guidelines. The EAC looks forward to holding hearings on these Principles and Guidelines soon and we encourage the public to provide their feedback on the proposed guidelines,” said EAC Chairman Thomas Hicks, who joined Vice Chair Christy McCormick, Commissioner Ben Hovland and Commissioner Donald Palmer in supporting the measure.

The proposed VVSG 2.0 Principles and Guidelines will be published in the Federal Register in accordance with sections 222(a)(1) and 222(d) of the Help America Vote Act of 2002. They will appear in the Federal Register for a period of 90 days. Separately, upon the completion of the VVSG 2.0’s accompanying Requirements developed by NIST and the EAC, those accompanying Requirements will also be subject to public review and comment, including distribution to the EAC’s Technical Guidelines Development Committee (TGDC), Standards Board and Board of Advisors. This review and comment period will take place prior to consideration and implementation by the Commission.

VVSG are a set of Principles, Guidelines and Requirements against which voting systems can be tested to determine if the systems meet required standards. Some factors examined under these tests include functionality, accessibility, accuracy, auditability and security capabilities.

The Help America Vote Act of 2002 mandates that EAC develop and maintain these requirements as well as testing and certifying voting systems. On December 13, 2005, the EAC unanimously adopted the 2005 VVSG, which significantly increased security requirements for voting systems and expanded access, including opportunities for individuals with disabilities to vote privately and independently. The 2005 guidelines updated and augmented the 2002 Voting System Standards, as required by HAVA, to address advancements in election practices and computer technologies. These guidelines were again updated by the EAC’s Commissioners on March 31, 2015. These guidelines are voluntary. States may decide to adopt them entirely or in part prior to the effective date.

The structure of the new VVSG reflects modifications proposed by the election community, EAC, NIST and the TGDC, which is comprised of election officials, voting system manufacturers, disability experts, cyber security experts, technology experts, and other key election stakeholders. The new guidelines are a high level set of principles that will be supplemented by accompanying documents that detail specific requirements for how systems can meet the new guidelines and obtain certification. The supplemental documents will also detail assertions for how the accredited test laboratories will validate that a system complies with those requirements.

Last Spring, the EAC convened its advisory boards to review and comment on the adoption of the newest version of the voluntary guidelines, VVSG 2.0. Both Boards recommended that the EAC adopt VVSG 2.0. Today’s unanimous Commissioner vote occurred less than two weeks after a quorum of Commissioners was restored at the EAC.

Election Security Updates

Sens Amy Kobuchar (D-Minnesota), Mark Warner (D-Virginia), Jack Reed (D-Rhode Island) and Gary Peters (D-Michigan) have sent a letter to the three largest voting system vendors demanding more transparency about their plans to improve their products not just for 2020, but beyond.

“The integrity of our elections is directly tied to the machines we vote on — the products that you make,” says the letter according to CyberScoop. “Despite shouldering such a massive responsibility, there has been a lack of meaningful innovation in the election vendor industry and our democracy is paying the price.”

Also this week, Matt Masterson, a senior advisor to the Department of Security told CNET that the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Agency (CISA) is doubling down on its efforts to secure the 2020 election cycle. Masterson told the publication that CISA’s focus will be on local election authorities.

Election News This Week

Voters in Pittsburg County, Oklahoma were surprised recently when they received letters from the county elections board asking them to confirm their registration and include their official 911 address. Election Board Secretary Cathy Thornton told the McAlester News-Capital that it’s the elections board way of updating the records for many voters who live in rural areas and may have initially registered using rural routes or highway contract routes. When the county moved to a 911 system many of those rural routes were renamed which has lead to returned mail when the elections office has sought to contact voters. The county sent out about 2,400 letters.

Following the February 14, 2018 shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland Florida, students who survived the shooting rallied people, especially young people, across the country to register to vote and by many accounts, more young people than ever before voted in the 2018 midterms. But did their votes count? According to an analysis by Daniel A. Smith, chairman of the political science department at the University of Florida, about 1 in 7 mail-in ballots by college-age voters in Parkland was rejected. According to The Washington Post, Smith discovered that15 percent of mail-in ballots submitted by Parkland residents between ages 18 and 21 were never counted in the midterm election, far exceeding the statewide average. A spokesman for the Broward County Supervisor of Elections said he could not comment on Smith’s findings “unless and until” the office reviewed his data and methodology.

It’s only taken five years, but finally, Lake County, Indiana has pared down the number of precincts in the country from 523 to 364 in time for the May municipal primary. It all began back in 2014 when the Legislature ordered the county to pare down the precincts. The largely Democratic county balked at the order from the Republican-controlled Legislature. When the Indiana Election Commission failed to adopt a consolidation plan, the secretary of state issued a plan in 2018, which the county rejected. Further back-and-forth ensued until a final plan was adopted last week. Under the final plan, nearly all of the consolidated precincts have at least 1,000 registered voters, according to figures provided to The Northwest Times. In some cases, three precincts were merged instead of two.

This week, Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose announced a competition to create a new statewide “I Voted” sticker. The contest is open to all Ohio students in grades 6-12 and a winner will be chose by, you guessed it, a vote, which will be open to all Ohioans. The contest runs until April 28.  Arlington County, Virginia is also embarking on their own search for a new and unique “I Voted” sticker. The Arlington Electoral Board is partnering with the Arlington Artists Alliance to run the competition. Submissions, from any Arlington resident, are due April 12. A selection committee will then winnow the field with the final decision being left up to a public vote. We here at electionline are very excited to see both the Ohio and Arlington winners and hopefully add one of each to our collection (hint, hint).

Personnel News: Barb Frank has retired as the Jefferson County, Wisconsin clerk. Calcasieu Parish Registrar of Voters Angie Quienalty is retiring after 24 years on the job. Former Daviess County Clerk David Osborne has been appointed to the Kentucky State Board of Elections. Kalliopi Karapetsas has been fired from the Trumbull County, Ohio board of elections. Justin Crigler has been appointed Boone County, Kentucky clerk. Martha Vaughn has stepped down from the Stewart County, Tennessee election commission.

Legislative Updates

Arizona: Gov. Greg Ducey has signed a bill into law that will require early voters casting a ballot at a countywide voting center to provide the same forms of ID that they would have to show if they voted at the polls on Election Day.

Also in Arizona, a bill that would automatically remove voters from a permanent early voting list if they miss two consecutive elections passed the House Elections Committee on a party-line vote.

California: The Solano County board of supervisors voted unanimously this week to wait until after the 2020 election cycle to move to regional vote centers.

Florida: PCB SAC 19-01 has passed the House State Affairs Committee. Under the proposal, Floridians would be able to fix signature problems on their vote-by-mail and provisional ballots until two days after elections, and supervisors would be able to mail domestic vote-by-mail ballots earlier to voters, between 40 days and 28 days before elections. The bill also legalizes ballot selfies.

Idaho: By a 22-12 vote, Bill 270, which will make sure public schools are available to serve as polling places, has been approved by the Senate. If signed by Governor Brad Little, the bill would go into effect in July 2020.

Illinois: Sen. Ram Villivalam (D-Chicago) has introduced legislation that would give any registered voters who casts a ballot in a general election a $25 state tax credit.

Indiana: A Senate committee has rejected an amendment that would have required tracking numbers on all absentee ballot envelopes. Senators opposing the amendment questioned the Postal Service’s ability to provide the service.

Iowa: The House has approved House File 692 which mandates all 99 counties to use ballot tracking from the U.S. Postal Service for absentee ballots.

New Hampshire: The Senate has unanimously approved Senate Bill 104 which would allow towns to postpone and reschedule elections due to poor weather conditions or other emergencies.

New Jersey: By a 77-0 vote, the Assembly has approved a bill that will allow counties to use e-poll books to check-in voters at polling places.

New Mexico: Gov. Michelle Lujuan Grisham has signed Senate Bill 672 into law which allows for election day registration.

North Dakota: The Senate has killed a bill that would have given legislators a say before counties change legislative district boundaries.

Pennsylvania: State Sen. Elder Vogel Jr. has introduced legislation to create a Pennsylvania Election Law Advisory Board to consider possible statutory changes and other issues, such as emerging election technology.

Texas: Rep. Stephanie Klick (R-Fort Worth) has introduced House Bill 3576 and House Bill 3578. House Bill 3576 makes it mandatory for counties to update their voter registration databases—current law says the “may” do list maintenance, the legislation would change that to “shall”. And under House Bill 3578 district courts would determine the final order of felony conviction on an individual to directly notify the secretary of state’s office that a person is no longer eligible to vote.

Also in Texas, Under House Bill 1419 felons on parole or under supervision would regain their right to vote.

Virginia: Gov. Ralph Northam has vetoed two elections-related bills. House Bill 2764 would have required anyone who assists a voter with a registration application, or collects applications  to provide their name, number and information about the group they are working/volunteering for. Northam also vetoed Senate Bill 1038 that would have required registrars to verify the name, date of birth and social security matched information on file with the Social Security Administration.

Legal Updates

California: The California Court of Appeals has ruled that the City of Santa Monica does not need to hold a special election to choose a new council while the city is appeal a decision in a voting rights case.

Massachusetts: A Massachusetts judge has ruled that the way the Fall River charter is written, the incumbent mayor can be recalled and re-elected on the same ballot.

Tech Thursday

California: According to Contra Costa County Clerk-Recorder and Registrar of Voters Joe Canciamilla, an unknown hacker recently tried to access the county’s election internet system. “Our security protocols captured and isolated the threat almost immediately,” Canciamilla wrote in the email. The system was never breached and the situation has been reported to the secretary of state’s office and the Department of Homeland Security.

Utah: According to a report originally published by Bloomberg News, Facebook stopped an overseas ad from that was attempting to target Utah’s midterm election. “This is kind of part of the new world that we live in, that we all watch this stuff,” Utah elections director Justin Lee told KKSL.

Opinions This Week

National Opinions: Ranked choice voting | Blockchain | Native American voting rights | HR 1 | Voting age | Russian interference

Arizona: Vote by mail | Early voting list

California: Ranked choice voting

Delaware: Voting system

Florida: Ex-felon voting rights, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII, VIII, IX

Illinois: Voter access

Indiana: Voting location | Poll workers; Turnout

Iowa: Election legislation, II, III | Voting rights

Massachusetts: Ranked choice voting

New Hampshire: Election crises

New Mexico: Ranked choice voting

North Carolina: Ballot security | Election fraud

Tennessee: Voter registration | Ex-felon voting rights

Texas: Polling place attire | Voter fraud | Election security

Upcoming Events

Election Center Special Workshop —The Election Center will hold a special workshop that will include: Course 9 (Enfranchisement, Enhancement, Enforcement ); Course 10 (Constitution, Courts & Cases to 1965); and Renewal Course 14 (Crisis Management). Where: Virginia Beach. When: April 24-28.

Election Mail Forum One-Day Conference — you are invited to participate in a special one-day Election Mail Forum exclusively at the National Postal Forum, Monday May 6, 2019 at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis Indiana. Come see community leaders showcase election mail. Don’t miss the opportunity to learn and network with Postal Service Leadership, State Election Executives, and election mail preparation vendors. Learn how to Leverage USPS Addressing Products to improve voter roll quality. Come learn about Full Service, STID, IMb— an alternative for “postmark” authentication. When: May 6. Where: Indianapolis.

National Association of Secretaries Of State — The National Association of Secretaries of State will hold their annual summer conference in late June, early July in New Mexico. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registrations. When: June 30-July 3. Where: Santa Fe, New Mexico.

International Association of Government Officials — IGO’s 2019 Annual Conference will be held in Houston, Texas, July 11-17. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of Counties — NACo’s 2019 Annual Conference will be held in Clark County (Las Vegas), Nevada July 11-15, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of State Election Directors — The NASED Summer Conference will be held in Austin, Texas, July 14-16, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

Job Postings This Week

electionlineWeekly publishes election administration job postings each week as a free service to our readers. To have your job listed in the newsletter, please send a copy of the job description, including a web link to mmoretti@electionline.org.  Job postings must be received by 5pm on Wednesday in order to appear in the Thursday newsletter. Listings will run for three weeks or till the deadline listed in the posting.

Clerk of the Board/Elections Director, Santa Cruz County, Arizona — Under the direction of the Santa Cruz County Board of Supervisors and guidance from the Santa Cruz County Manager, performs statutory duties of the Clerk of the Board pursuant to ARS 11-241 and other statutory duties, to include preparing, publishing and posting the agenda for the Board of Supervisor meetings.  Under limited supervision, performs work of considerable difficulty to plan, organize, coordinate, direct and manage all activities of the Santa Cruz County Elections Department in compliance with applicable laws, rules and regulations. This is an at-will position. Plans, organizes, coordinates, directs and manages all activities of the Santa Cruz County Elections Department in compliance with applicable laws, rules, and regulations; oversees daily operations and programing; develops and administers departmental budget and oversees expenditures, develops and administers training and education for election staff and volunteers.  Develops and implements procedural and technical improvements as they relate to elections; ensures quality control of all aspects of election from ballot production to public information; manages projects, coordinates with other county/state departments and outside vendors. Salary: $69,186. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Deputy Director, Washington Secretary of State’s Office— this position reports to the certification and training program manager and is responsible for overseeing, reviewing and advising county auditors on the federal and state elections laws and the administration of voter registration.  Serves as the lead program specialist in the required election administrator certification program; Certifies state and local election administrators following a series of classes and tests. Participates in the elections training program and county election review program; travels extensively throughout the state to conduct reviews of county elections departments. Participates in the initiative and referenda filing and clearinghouse advisories program. Provide support to Washington State counties on election processes, county WEI systems, and logic and accuracy test program. Salary: $4,275.00 – $5,745.00 Monthly. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Director, Miami County, Ohio Board of Elections— The Miami County Board of Elections is seeking applicants for the position of Director. This position, in cooperation with the Deputy Director, is responsible for overseeing, directing and managing the Board of Elections Office; developing, recommending, and adhering to an annual budget; and conducting fair and impartial elections. Qualified candidates must be affiliated with the Republican Party, reside within Miami County or be able to relocate within 30 days of accepting the position. Applicants must agree to a background check. A candidate for Director of the Board of Elections must possess at least a high school diploma or its equivalency. College level education is desired, and specialized training and/or certification in the various aspects of election administration is to be favored in evaluating applicants. Application: Applicants are requested to demonstrate how they meet the necessary qualifications of the job description when submitting their resume. Interested parties may receive a copy of the job description, evaluation criteria and Ohio Secretary of State Form 307 by visiting the Miami County Board of Elections website at www.miami.ohioboe.com. The website also has the Questionnaire for Prospective Appointment as a Member, Director or Deputy Director of the County Board of Elections (Form No. 307) on it. Any qualified registered Republican may apply by submitting Form 307, along with a current resume, to Miami County Board of Elections, Old Courthouse, 215 West Main Street, Troy, Ohio 45373, or by emailing iridgeway@miamicountyohio.gov. Applications will be accepted until the position is filled.

Director of Elections/General Registrar, Arlington County, Virginia— This is a four-year term position appointed by the Electoral Board with a starting date of July 1, 2019 and an end date of June 30, 2023. The Arlington County Electoral Board is seeking a Director of Elections/General Registrar to provide professional and technical leadership to the Office of Elections and manage the planning, overseeing, and administering of elections in Arlington County. The Director is responsible for ensuring the necessary resources are acquired and in place to maintain the list of registered voters and assure elections are well-prepared and conducted in an accurate, efficient, and transparent manner. Specific duties and responsibilities include: Planning, developing, coordinating, and directing the activities of the Office of Elections, including voter registration; candidate processing and filing; pre-election and Election Day voting; ballot design; equipment programming and testing; poll worker recruitment and training; and voter outreach efforts. Preparing and continuously evaluating the department’s strategic goals and equipment security plan. Supervising permanent and temporary staff of up to 50 individuals, including recruitment, training, scheduling and work assignment, implementation of policies and procedures, performance evaluation, and conflict resolution. Coordinating the administrative processes with the deputy registrar, including but not limited to, budget development and monitoring, County administrative and personnel policies, and technology resources. Consulting and coordinating with County Attorney and Commonwealth’s Attorney as needed on legal issues. Analyzing departmental performance and usage data to make informed projections about future needs, including staffing, space requirements, equipment, and supplies. Providing guidance and technical support to candidates seeking election to local offices, and certifying eligible candidates for elections, including reviewing qualifications and processing of petitions. Managing communication tools including web page, social media, and outreach materials, and ensuring information is accurate and timely. Monitoring legislation introduced at the state and federal levels related to elections and election administration, and providing advice and expertise to legislators as needed. Serving the community and professional organizations as a subject matter expert on elections and election administration; and representing the County at regional, state, and national workshops and conferences. This Director must be self-directed and will have no direct immediate supervisor but will report to and seek guidance from the Arlington County Electoral Board. Additionally, the incumbent will receive guidance and advice from the Virginia Department of Elections as well as from various County departments and is responsible for keeping the Board informed of all relevant matters pertaining to the smooth operation of the department. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Director, Coconino County, Arizona  – Where our opportunities are as vast as our landscapes. Do you have a Bachelor’s degree in public administration and five years progressively responsible administrative or supervisory experience? Do you want to join a dedicated team who is committed to processing and creating public records for our community? The Coconino County Recorder’s Office is seeking an Elections Director. This position coordinates with state, cities, towns and special districts for election services, develops and manages the division’s budget, ensures quality control of all aspects of elections and more. If you are seeking employment satisfaction, a sense of pride in your work and the knowledge that your daily efforts have a direct impact on the community and are in pursuit of a collaborative work environment where diversity is embraced, and accomplishments are celebrated we look forward to seeing your application for our Elections Director. Salary: $87,161 – $100,235 Annually.  Deadline: 04/19/19 at 5PM. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Election Technician, Monroe County, Washington— The individual assigned to this classification provides administrative and technical duties related to the election process and voter outreach. This classification is primarily responsible for assisting in all duties required to conduct elections and maintain voter registration. This individual receives significant public contact requiring effective written and oral communication skills and service to the customers. The Auditor’s office is a small office and all staff are crossed trained in Vehicle Licensing and Recording to assist the other departments. Communicates with customers, in person, by phone, and through written correspondence, effectively in English and preferably in Spanish as well. Maintains and updates the Auditor’s Office web presence. Coordinates speaking engagements. Assists public with voter registration process. Maintains a working knowledge of the local voter registration system and ballot processing software. Assists with the election process by issuing replacement ballots, receiving incoming ballots, verifying voters’ signatures, etc. Salary: $3,042 – $3,896/monthly. Deadline: April 5. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

GIS Analyst, Yolo County, California— Yolo County ACE (Assessor/Clerk-Recorder/Elections Department) in coordination with the Yolo County General Services department are recruiting for a G.I.S. Analyst. This recruitment is on-going until filled. Submitted applications will be screened continuously, and those applicants meeting the minimum qualifications will move forward to the Screening for Best Qualified process. This position will work inter-departmentally to develop and implement GIS capabilities in Yolo County ACE. GIS is viewed by County Leadership as an innovative enterprise technology that is positioned to help advance County strategic goals. Recent projects include implementing a new enterprise environment, developing an Elections Night Reporting application, developing mobile applications for polling place reporting, and a migration the ESRI Parcel Fabric. The ideal candidate for this position will be a positive, collaborative, solution-focused individual with excellent interpersonal and customer service skills and the ability to handle and manage multiple priorities. If you feel like you meet these qualifications and you would like to join a dynamic organization committed to supporting an environment where employees feel a true sense of passion, purpose and commitment to their job… Yolo County ACE is where you want to be! Our department strives to honor the public’s trust and redefine excellence through innovation and the commitment of a highly-engaged and empowered team. Check out all the exciting things ACE has going on by visiting our social media pages (Facebook: /YoloACE, Instagram: /YoloCoACE, and Twitter: @YoloCoACE). You can be the next Yolo ACE – come and join our team! Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Project Manager, Hart InterCivic— Project Managers at Hart InterCivic are highly motivated “self-starters” who are enthusiastic about providing exceptional customer service. Working with other members of the Professional Services and Operations teams, the Project Manager directs activity, solves problems, and develops lasting and strong relationships with our customers. Hart InterCivic’s unique and industry known culture of innovation, transparency, and customer-centric focus creates an environment where team members will continually grow and be challenged to develop their careers. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Product Manager, Hart InterCivic — as Product Manager, you will join a team that is charged with product planning, design, and execution throughout the lifecycle of Hart’s products, in support of the company’s overall strategy and goals. This includes: gathering, validating, and prioritizing internal and external customer needs; documenting and communicating product and technical requirements; gathering market and competitive intelligence; supporting the certification, sales, and marketing teams. The Product Manager must possess a unique blend of business and technical savvy – with experience in elections technology or other government-oriented products preferred.  To succeed in this role, the ideal candidate must spend time in the market to understand its unique attributes; demonstrate competence with specialized hardware and software; and find innovative solutions for the broader market. The Product Manager plays a key role in helping others to understand the product positioning, key benefits, and target customer, as well as providing advanced subject matter expertise in using the company’s products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Systems Software Specialist, Yolo County, California — The Elections Branch of Yolo County ACE (Assessor/Clerk-Recorder/Elections Department) in coordination with the Yolo County Information Technology department are recruiting for a Systems Software Specialist. This recruitment is on-going until filled. The Systems Software Specialist class series is responsible for the design, coding, implementation, maintenance and evaluation of computer software. This includes, but is not limited to, operating systems, control systems, proprietary software packages, telecommunications software and database management software. The class also aides in solving problems and achieving the best use of available hardware and software; work with staff to design and implement network segmentation, domain addressing and routing strategies; work with technical staff to ensure effective operations of complex multiple hardware and software configurations; and act as a lead persons over other personnel and program projects and performs related duties as required. If you would like to join a dynamic organization committed to supporting an environment where employees feel a true sense of passion, purpose and commitment to their job… Yolo County ACE is where you want to be! Our department strives to honor the public’s trust and redefine excellence through innovation and the commitment of a highly-engaged and empowered team. Check out all the exciting things ACE has going on by visiting our social media pages (Facebook: /YoloACE, Instagram: /YoloCoACE, and Twitter: @YoloCoACE). You can be the next Yolo ACE – come and join our team! Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Technical Bid Specialist, Scytl — The Technical Bid Specialist is an essential member of the sales team, supporting business development initiatives as well as providing support to the Marketing department. Based in our Tampa Florida, offices, the Technical Bid Specialist is in charge of managing the coordination, completion and handover of tender proposals for our clients and prospects. This is a key position with a great deal of involvement in the sales process and a decisive influence in the achievement of each deal. To be able to perform this task, the Technical Bid Specialist needs to possess a solid technical background, outstanding writing capabilities and proven experience in pre-sales or consulting endeavors, always facing the client and having to put together complex IT proposals or projects. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Training Officer, Collier County, Florida— The purpose of this classification is to provide assistance in the Training & Outreach Department within the Supervisor of Elections office. This position coaches, trains, and educates election workers in accordance with the State of Florida’s election laws and rules. Work involves designing, developing, and delivering multimodal adult learning programs, developing training materials, scheduling training sessions, and recruiting, assigning and evaluating election workers for upcoming election cycles. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Marketplace

electionline provides no guarantees as to the quality of the items being sold and the accuracy of the information provided about the sale items in the Marketplace. Ads are provided directly by sellers and are not verified by electionline. If you have an ad for Marketplace, please email it to: mmoretti@electionline.org

Excess Equipment
Pinal County, Arizona has some excess elections equipment including 19 OS machines and approximately 300 voter booths. If interested, contact Stephanie Cooper, Pinal County elections supervisor at 520-866-7552 or drop her an email at stephanie.cooper@pinalcountyaz.gov.

Ballot Scanners
Ballot reader. $500. Buyer will be responsible for pick and shipping to buyer’s location. Contact Wilfred Cochico, purchasing officer City of Lakewood: 562-866-9771 ext. 2640 or via email: WCochico@lakewoodcity.org.

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In Focus This Week

March 21, 2019

March 21, 2019

In Focus This Week

What’s your brand?
Basic brand identities and experiences are important for elections offices

By M. Mindy Moretti
electionline.org

The interlocking red and gold circles of MasterCard. Nike’s swoosh. McDonald’s golden arches.

Those are easily identifiable brands, but what about for state and local elections offices? Is your brand identifiable to voters in your jurisdiction? When a letter from your elections office arrives in the mail is it immediately identifiable to a voter as coming from the elections office?

Branding, which includes everything from a logo to fonts to certain color schemes to tone of voice can be as important for government agencies as it is for commercial businesses.

“Through consistency, you build familiarity and trust with what you offer,” explained Drew Davies, owner/designer at Oxide Design Co. which has worked with folks like the U.S. Election Assistance Commission and The Pew Charitable Trusts. “While an elections office doesn’t have ‘competitors’ in the same way that a toy store may, you certainly want the general population to be able to immediately recognize you — and even have positive associations with your office.”

Davies said it’s important to have a set of basic brand identity guidelines, a brand guide, that contains all approved versions of the logo, simple instructions on how the logo should and should not be used, one or two specified brand typeface(s), and up to three specified brand colors. If there are other brand elements in place that should be used consistently, they should also be included —  a vision/mission statement, a tagline, even layout templates for recurring print pieces and/or digital marketing.

“This brand guide builds valuable consistency by keeping everyone playing by the same set of rules,” Davies said. “It doesn’t have to be ‘professionally designed’ or particularly long. It just has to list the brand identity elements and explain the rules clearly and simply.”

Davies said elections offices don’t necessarily need to hire branding firms to come up with logos and a complete brand. He said the simplest way to proceed is to create a simple logotype of the agency’s name. Think companies Sony, Progressive and The New York Times.

For a quick way to make a logotype recognizable, think about meaningful line breaks or visual emphasis on the key words in the name. Then, instead of re-typing the name in any given circumstance, always use the official logotype file. This type of logo, along with a clear and concise brand guide, can be created by anyone in an elections office — even if they don’t have any formal design training.

Davies said he regularly counsels clients that a bad logo, used consistently, is infinitely more valuable than even the best logo used inconsistently.

“Especially as a government agency, your job isn’t to differentiate yourself from competitors. It’s to consistently use a brand identity that conveys stability, trustworthiness, clarity, and simplicity,” Davies said. “People should be able to recognize you immediately, and trust that communications from you come from an official source.”

Consistent use of fonts and colors is also important for branding. Fonts matter, not just on ballots, but in all elections materials.

“In our research, for most of the materials produced by an elections office — forms, ballots, and the like — people read sans serif typefaces more easily and accurately,” Davies said.

“Sans serif” typefaces are the ones without the extra little bumps, or feet, on them; commonly used examples are Helvetica, Arial, and Roboto.

“We suggest selecting a single sans serif typeface and using only that font whenever possible. Using a single typeface throughout all of your materials will help to underscore the consistency and trustworthiness of your office,” he added.

Having unique or memorable colors isn’t particularly important for government agencies such as elections offices, Davies said, but it is notably more valuable to establish a color or two that convey trustworthiness and ease of use, and use them with draconian consistency.

“As I see it, there’s no reason those colors couldn’t be red and blue — after all, what’s more American than elections?” Davies added.

In addition to consistent use of logo, fonts and colors, it is also important to have a consistent voice.

“When an election office develops content for a website, or messaging for social media, or develops a paper notice, the writer is making word choices that convey the personality of the office,” explained Dana Chisnell, co-director of the Center for Civic Design [a Democracy Fund grantee] “Is it official or officious? Is it friendly or causal? What does the voice and tone assume about the reader?”

Chisnell said every office should develop a style guide. A simple one would answer the question, “If this text were being said by a person, what would that person be like? What tone would they take?”

“…[I]t’s not only the logo. It’s how you present yourself to the world. Is it a unified personality? Or does everyone do what they want?” Chisnell said.

Brand Identity vs. Brand Experience
Matthew Quint, director, Center on Global Brand Leadership at the Columbia Business School said that while brand identity is important for elections officials brand experience may actually ultimately be more important.

Quint said a strong, consistent logo, font, color scheme are important to convey a county elections office’s brand, but ultimately what it’s like when a voter shows up at their polling place may have a greater impact. Brand identity vs. brand experience.

“What is it like when I show up at my polling to vote. Is it well organized. Is it clear what’s on the ballot. Are the instructions for how to vote clear. Is the room too warm/cold. Are the people friendly?” Quint said.

Quint, who grew up visiting polling places in New York with his mother who was volunteer for the League of Women Voters said that Election Day experience is so important to convey the confidence and trustworthiness that elections officials want to.

Relying on voters and volunteers for help and feedback is crucial to a brand experience Quint said noting that electoral systems are viewed by people as a community event so use that to bolster an elections office brand experience.

“Think about the experience,” Quit said. “Imagine yourself as a voter. What’s it like for you? Get voters and volunteers to provide feedback about what worked and what could be done better.”

(Editor’s Note: This week’s story marks the third piece in our series on the important role that communications play in an elections office. Previously we’ve heard from Alton Dillard of the Denver County Clerk and Recorder’s Office on Communications 101 and from Kurt Sampsel of the Center for Technology and Civic Life on  What makes an effective elections website. In the not-so-distant past we’ve also covered effective uses of social media.)

VVSG Public Comment Period

The U.S. Election Assistance Commission’s (EAC) four sitting Commissioners unanimously voted to publish the proposed Voluntary Voting System Guidelines 2.0 (VVSG) Principles and Guidelines in the Federal Register for a 90 day public comment period, after which comments and feedback on the proposed document will be compiled and presented to the Commissioners for discussion and consideration.

“Today’s unanimous vote demonstrates the Commissioners’ shared commitment to taking this next important step in consideration of the proposed VVSG 2.0 Principles and Guidelines. The EAC looks forward to holding hearings on these Principles and Guidelines soon and we encourage the public to provide their feedback on the proposed guidelines,” said EAC Chairman Thomas Hicks, who joined Vice Chair Christy McCormick, Commissioner Ben Hovland and Commissioner Donald Palmer in supporting the measure.

The proposed VVSG 2.0 Principles and Guidelines will be published in the Federal Register in accordance with sections 222(a)(1) and 222(d) of the Help America Vote Act of 2002. They will appear in the Federal Register for a period of 90 days. Separately, upon the completion of the VVSG 2.0’s accompanying Requirements developed by NIST and the EAC, those accompanying Requirements will also be subject to public review and comment, including distribution to the EAC’s Technical Guidelines Development Committee (TGDC), Standards Board and Board of Advisors. This review and comment period will take place prior to consideration and implementation by the Commission.

VVSG are a set of Principles, Guidelines and Requirements against which voting systems can be tested to determine if the systems meet required standards. Some factors examined under these tests include functionality, accessibility, accuracy, auditability and security capabilities.

The Help America Vote Act of 2002 mandates that EAC develop and maintain these requirements as well as testing and certifying voting systems. On December 13, 2005, the EAC unanimously adopted the 2005 VVSG, which significantly increased security requirements for voting systems and expanded access, including opportunities for individuals with disabilities to vote privately and independently. The 2005 guidelines updated and augmented the 2002 Voting System Standards, as required by HAVA, to address advancements in election practices and computer technologies. These guidelines were again updated by the EAC’s Commissioners on March 31, 2015. These guidelines are voluntary. States may decide to adopt them entirely or in part prior to the effective date.

The structure of the new VVSG reflects modifications proposed by the election community, EAC, NIST and the TGDC, which is comprised of election officials, voting system manufacturers, disability experts, cyber security experts, technology experts, and other key election stakeholders. The new guidelines are a high level set of principles that will be supplemented by accompanying documents that detail specific requirements for how systems can meet the new guidelines and obtain certification. The supplemental documents will also detail assertions for how the accredited test laboratories will validate that a system complies with those requirements.

Last Spring, the EAC convened its advisory boards to review and comment on the adoption of the newest version of the voluntary guidelines, VVSG 2.0. Both Boards recommended that the EAC adopt VVSG 2.0. Today’s unanimous Commissioner vote occurred less than two weeks after a quorum of Commissioners was restored at the EAC.

Election News This Week

This week, Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson (D) announced the creation of an Election Security Commission that will recommend reforms and strategies to secure Michigan’s elections. The commission includes 18 local and national experts on cybersecurity and election security with some familiar national-level names like former Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams, Matt Masterson from CISA, Jennifer Morrell a risk limiting audit consultant and Josh Franklin, formerly of NIST. The commission will be co-chaired by David Becker of the Center for Election Innovation and Research and J. Alex Halderman, a computer science professor at the University of Michigan. “The security of our elections is critical to the security of our democracy,” Benson said. “I am grateful that many of our nation’s top election security experts have joined forces with our local election officials to develop a plan that will ensure Michigan’s elections are secured against all known and emerging threats.” The commission’s first meeting will be held in April and will deliver a set of recommendations to the secretary of state’s office by the end of 2019. The commission is funded through a HAVA 2 grant.

Fallout continues from the botched 2018 elections in Porter County, Indiana. Last week, in a scathing letter, Secretary of State Connie Lawson chastised the county elections officials for allowing personal conflicts to impact the administration of the election. “Even though each was aware of potential problems leading up to the election, personality conflicts, vindictive behavior and personal pride prevented any action from being taken,” Lawson wrote in her letter according to the Northwest Times. “Not only did these individuals put a heavy burden on dedicated employees within county government who were attempting to execute their responsibilities properly, they failed to meet the expectations and needs of Porter County voters.” Lawson’s letter accompanied an audit of the elections office and included 18 recommendations for improving the process moving forward. “I was pleasantly surprised by some of these because we actually are on the same track,” Clerk Jessica Bailey said. This week, Election Board President JJ Stankiewicz was forced to resign after video surfaced of Stankiewicz in a shouting match with Bailey.

Hanover, Massachusetts Town Clerk Catherine Harder-Berneir is taking the unusual step of recusing herself from conducting the upcoming May election because she is on the ballot seeking re-election. Instead, she has enlisted the help of Narice Casper, Marshfield town clerk and Andrew Dowd, Northborough town clerk to serve as temporary clerks on Election Day. “As the elected town clerk of Hanover, I am running for re-election in 2019, and have already qualified for the ballot. Despite the fact that there is an exemption in the law that permits town clerks to perform election-related functions, I understand that I will be a walking campaign sign on Election Day, and that my presence inside the polls on Election Day could be construed by some to be a conflict of interest. Therefore, I will enter the polls briefly during the day only to vote, as any other resident of the town would. Otherwise, I will remain outside the 150-foot no-electioneering line all morning, afternoon, and evening.”

What if you held an election and people showed up to vote, but there was no one for them vote for on the ballot? That was the case this week in the small village of Poland in New York. No one stepped up to run for the village mayor’s position, but the village held the election anyway. Whoever gets the most write-in votes will ultimately win the $2,5000-per year job. “It sounds very rare. Very weird,” said Onondaga County Board of Elections Commissioner Michele Sardo. While it is rare, John Conklin, spokesman for the New York State Board of Elections told Syracuse.com that it has happened before in other villages.

Personnel News: David Triplett and Christina Tvedeten have been appointed interim elections manager and interim elections manager in Ramsey County, Minnesota. Fulton County, Illinois Clerk Jim Nelson is retiring May 31. Chairman James Adcock and Commissioner Betty Gibbs have resigned from the Stewart County, Tennessee election commission. Richard Carter has retired from the Guernsey County, Ohio board of elections after 38 years. Betty Gift, 97, has retired as a poll worker in Wayne County, Ohio after 50 years of volunteering. Brandon John Varin is the new Franklin County, New York Democratic election commissioner. Thomas Mahoney III has been re-appointed as chairman of the Chatham County, Georgia board of elections. Erin McTiernan has been hired as assistant election commissioner in Suffolk County, New York. Montana Senate President Scott Sales (R) has announced his run for secretary of state in 2020.

Research and Report Updates

Nonprofit VOTE and the U.S. Elections Project released a report on turnout in the 2018 midterm elections this week. The report, America Goes to the Polls: Voter Turnout and Election Policy in the 50 States, finds that voter turnout was 50.3 percent in 2018, the highest midterm turnout since 1914 and the largest increase from a previous midterm in U.S. history. The report highlights that every state except Alaska and Louisiana saw an increase in midterm turnout when compared to 2014. Despite the record turnout nationwide, the study finds that the vast differences in turnout was largely driven by election-related policies and explores the turnout variation among states with same-day registration, vote-by-mail, automatic voter registration, early voter registration deadlines, and other policies.

The Kofi Annan Commission on Elections and Democracy in the Digital Age released a report by Nathaniel Persily earlier this month on the internet and democracy. The report, The Internet’s Challenge to Democracy: Framing the Problem and Assessing Reforms, explores problems exacerbated by internet freedom, including disinformation, hate speech, incitement, and foreign interference in elections, and offers a framework for better understanding such problems and assessing potential reforms.

(Research and Report Summaries are written by David Kuennen.)

Legislative Updates

Arizona: The House has approved House Bill 2616 that would make it a misdemeanor to pay someone based on the number people they sign up to vote. Violators would be subject to six months in jail and a $2,5000 fine.

California: Assemblyman Ash Kalra has introduced Assembly Bill 59 that would amend the California Voters’ Choice Act to require college campuses with 10,000 or more students to host vote centers.

Colorado: Gov. Jared Polis (D) has signed legislation into law that will include Colorado in the National Popular Vote compact. Groups lead by local county legislators have begun circulating petitions to repeal the law. Supporter of an appeal have until August 1 to gather approximately 200,000 signatures.

Connecticut: The Government Administration and Elections Committee advanced a proposal on Tuesday that would amend the state constitution to allow early voting and no-excuse absentee voting.

Delaware:  Proposals to allow early voting and same-day registration have passed their first hurdles in Delaware’s legislature. The early voting bill would allow registered voters to cast ballots at vote centers at least 10 days before an election. The House has approved the early voting bill by 34-6 vote.

Florida: The Fort Myers city council has vote to move the city elections to even years to coincide with the national election cycle.

Also in Florida, in a strict party-line vote the House Criminal Justice Subcommittee has advanced a bill that would require ex-felons to clear up any financial obligations associated with their sentence before being allowed to have their rights restored. Under the legislation meant to clarify Amendment 4, ex-felons convicted of murder or a felony sexual offense would also be excluded from having their rights restored.

Georgia: By a 101-69 vote, the House gave final approval for the purchase of a $150 million statewide electronic voting system.

Idaho: The House Senate Affairs Committee has advanced a bill that would require county commissioners, clerks and school districts to work together to ensure that schools remain available as polling places.

Iowa: A bill that would require postal barcodes on all absentee ballots in Iowa is heading to the Senate after the House passed it unanimously.

Kentucky: The Kentucky Legislature has approved a bill that will strip Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes of her power over the State Board of Elections and make it a misdemeanor for anyone to misuse the state’s voter registration system. Gov. Matt Bevin (R) signed the bill into law.

Maine: Lawmakers heard from dozens of witnesses this week on a bill that would expand Maine’s ranked choice voting system to include presidential elections.

Massachusetts: The Boston City Council is considering an ordinance that would require landlords to provide a voter registration form to new tenants when providing them with their lease and other documents.

Mississippi: Reforming ex-felon voting rights restoration seems have come to a halt in Mississippi this legislative session. According to the Clarion Ledger, at least 18 House bills were filed this session that would have led to those convicted of nonviolent felony offenses to having their rights restored after they served their sentence have all died.

Montana: The House is considering legislation already approved by the Senate that would allow county elections officials to begin opening mail ballots beginning the Thursday before Election Day and for the counting of those ballots to start on the Monday before the election. The legislation has the support of county election administrators.

New Jersey: Committees in both the Senate and the Assembly have approved legislation that will allow the state to join 33 others in using e-poll books to check voters in at the polls. The bills have bipartisan support.

Assemblyman Andrew Zwicker (D-Somerset) has introduced a bill that would establish ranked choice voting at all state-level and federal elections.

Assemblyman Kevin J. Rooney (R-Bergen) has introduced a resolution allowing the secretary of state’s office to implement programs to encourage women to exercise their right to vote in honor of the upcoming 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment.

New Mexico: Both the House and the Senate has now approved a bill that will allow for same-day registration. The bill also expands automated voter registration services to additional state agencies and not just the Department of Motor Vehicles.

North Carolina: Gov. Roy Cooper (D) has signed a bill into law that will delay the implementation of the state’s new voter ID law until 2020.

Oklahoma: The Oklahoma House has approved a bill that would require the state to periodically check the citizenship status of all registered voters in Oklahoma. The bill was approved 66-26.

Tennessee: A House panel has advanced a bill that will loosen the restrictions on ex-felon voting rights. Under the proposed legislation, formerly incarcerated individuals will no longer be required to be up-to-date on child support before their voting rights are restored.

Texas: Under Senate Bill 9, counties would be required to purchase election systems that use a voter-verifiable paper audit trail. The bill would also create a pilot program for post-election audits. The law also would prohibit electioneering within 1,000 feet of a polling place. If approved, Senate Bill 9 would increase criminal penalties for anyone who makes an error on a voter registration form.

Vermont: A tripartisan coalition of lawmakers has introduced a bill for Vermont to adopt ranked-choice voting.

Washington: Gov. Jay Inslee (D) has signed the Native America Voting Rights Act into law. Under the law, tribal members will be able to register to vote even if their home on the reservation does not have a standard street address. The law also allows voter registration on reservations and for ballot drop boxes to located on reservations.

Legal Updates

Federal Litigation: U.S. District Judge Amy Berman Jackson ruled in favor of the Campaign Legal Center and that the U.S. Department of Justice must release the names of the people mentioned in an email from a conservative group that tried to influence the makeup of the president’s disbanded voter-fraud commission.

Indiana: Datwaon Collier, 28 of Anderson plead guilty to 30 misdemeanor counts of voter registration fraud. He received a year of probation and must complete 50 hours of community service.

Kansas: A three-judge panel of the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals hear arguments this week in the ongoing case of Kansas’ proof-of-citizenship law. According to The Washington Post, Judge Jerome Holmes pointed out that the state’s law kept more than 30,000 people from registering. The state argued that wasn’t the law but bureaucratic problems.

Mississippi: A panel of the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has ordered lawmakers to redraw a Senate district where a lower court judge found that black residents’ voting power had been purposefully diluted.

Virginia: Yolanda W. Stokes, the former Hopewell, Virginia voter registrar has sued the Hopewell Electoral Board in an effort to get her job back. The suit alleges that the city violated the terms of the agreement she signed when she took her job.

Tech Thursday

Voting Technology: Multiple media outlets reported last week that the Defense Department’s Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has issued a $10 million contract to design and build a secure voting system. According to Motherboard, Oregon-based Galois, a longtime government contractor with experience in designing security and verifiable systems was awarded the contract. Motherboard writes that the system will use fully open source voting software and it will be built on secure open source hardware, made from secure designs and techniques developed over the last year as part of a special program at DARPA. The voting system will also be designed to create fully verifiable and transparent results so that voters don’t have to blindly trust that the machines and election officials delivered correct results.

Opinions This Week

National Opinions: Turnout | HR1, II | Voting Rights Act | Voting age | Voter suppression | Stolen democracy | Get Out The Vote| Election security | Barriers to voting

Arizona: Election legislation

California: Vote by mail | Voting age, II | Election Day holiday

Florida: Ex-felon voting rights, II, III | Noncitizen voting

Hawaii: Election legislation | Automatic voter registration

Indiana: Porter County

Iowa: Election legislation, II, III

Massachusetts: Ranked choice voting, II

Minnesota: Polling places

Missouri: Voter ID

Nevada: Election day registration

New Mexico: Election legislation

New York: Automatic voter registration | Voting machines

North Carolina: Voter ID, II | Voting fixes | Election fraud

Ohio: Equipment

Oklahoma: Election laws

Oregon: Ballot postage | Voter fraud

Pennsylvania: Voting machines, II

Tennessee: Turnout

Texas: Voter ID

Virginia: State board of elections | Poll workers

Washington: Presidential preference primary

Upcoming Events

Unrig Summit 2019 — This is no ordinary conference. Unrig is fast-paced, solutions-oriented, and fun. No boring speeches — 2019’s lineup has more trainings, more workshops, more tools to power you up. Featuring America’s most powerful presenters, expert trainers, activists, musicians, artists and more, we’re bringing together the brightest minds from the right and left to build a new political future for America. 3 days. 2 nights. 1 vision: Unrig the System. Where: Nashville, TN When: Fri March 29 – Sun March 31.

Election Center Special Workshop —The Election Center will hold a special workshop that will include: Course 9 (Enfranchisement, Enhancement, Enforcement ); Course 10 (Constitution, Courts & Cases to 1965); and Renewal Course 14 (Crisis Management). Where: Virginia Beach. When: April 24-28.

Election Mail Forum One-Day Conference — you are invited to participate in a special one-day Election Mail Forum exclusively at the National Postal Forum, Monday May 6, 2019 at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis Indiana. Come see community leaders showcase election mail. Don’t miss the opportunity to learn and network with Postal Service Leadership, State Election Executives, and election mail preparation vendors. Learn how to Leverage USPS Addressing Products to improve voter roll quality. Come learn about Full Service, STID, IMb— an alternative for “postmark” authentication. When: May 6. Where: Indianapolis.

National Association of Secretaries Of State — The National Association of Secretaries of State will hold their annual summer conference in late June, early July in New Mexico. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registrations. When: June 30-July 3. Where: Santa Fe, New Mexico.

International Association of Government Officials — IGO’s 2019 Annual Conference will be held in Houston, Texas, July 11-17. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of Counties — NACo’s 2019 Annual Conference will be held in Clark County (Las Vegas), Nevada July 11-15, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of State Election Directors — The NASED Summer Conference will be held in Austin, Texas, July 14-16, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

Job Postings This Week

electionlineWeekly publishes election administration job postings each week as a free service to our readers. To have your job listed in the newsletter, please send a copy of the job description, including a web link to mmoretti@electionline.org.  Job postings must be received by 5pm on Wednesday in order to appear in the Thursday newsletter. Listings will run for three weeks or till the deadline listed in the posting.

Clerk of the Board/Elections Director, Santa Cruz County, Arizona — Under the direction of the Santa Cruz County Board of Supervisors and guidance from the Santa Cruz County Manager, performs statutory duties of the Clerk of the Board pursuant to ARS 11-241 and other statutory duties, to include preparing, publishing and posting the agenda for the Board of Supervisor meetings.  Under limited supervision, performs work of considerable difficulty to plan, organize, coordinate, direct and manage all activities of the Santa Cruz County Elections Department in compliance with applicable laws, rules and regulations. This is an at-will position. Plans, organizes, coordinates, directs and manages all activities of the Santa Cruz County Elections Department in compliance with applicable laws, rules, and regulations; oversees daily operations and programing; develops and administers departmental budget and oversees expenditures, develops and administers training and education for election staff and volunteers.  Develops and implements procedural and technical improvements as they relate to elections; ensures quality control of all aspects of election from ballot production to public information; manages projects, coordinates with other county/state departments and outside vendors. Salary: $69,186. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Deputy Director, Washington Secretary of State’s Office— this position reports to the certification and training program manager and is responsible for overseeing, reviewing and advising county auditors on the federal and state elections laws and the administration of voter registration.  Serves as the lead program specialist in the required election administrator certification program; Certifies state and local election administrators following a series of classes and tests. Participates in the elections training program and county election review program; travels extensively throughout the state to conduct reviews of county elections departments. Participates in the initiative and referenda filing and clearinghouse advisories program. Provide support to Washington State counties on election processes, county WEI systems, and logic and accuracy test program. Salary: $4,275.00 – $5,745.00 Monthly. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Deputy Director, Center for Election Innovation & Research — the Deputy Director will report to the Executive Director and have a broad range of responsibilities designed to support CEIR’s mission. In this position, the Deputy Director will play an integral role in the development and execution of CEIR’s programming, strategic communications, and continued growth as an organization. This is an excellent opportunity for an experienced and highly motivated individual who wants to make a substantial, positive, nonpartisan impact on elections and American democracy. The Deputy Director’s primary workplace will be CEIR’s Washington, DC office. The Deputy Director also must be available for business travel as needed. CEIR believes that working alongside and understanding the diverse mix of people who are affected by elections and American democracy is key to achieving our mission. That’s why we’re proud to be an equal opportunity employer committed to creating a diverse, non-discriminatory work environment. We recruit, employ, train, compensate, and promote regardless of race, religion, color, national origin, sex, disability, age, veteran status, and other protected status as required by applicable law. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Director, Miami County, Ohio Board of Elections— The Miami County Board of Elections is seeking applicants for the position of Director. This position, in cooperation with the Deputy Director, is responsible for overseeing, directing and managing the Board of Elections Office; developing, recommending, and adhering to an annual budget; and conducting fair and impartial elections. Qualified candidates must be affiliated with the Republican Party, reside within Miami County or be able to relocate within 30 days of accepting the position. Applicants must agree to a background check. A candidate for Director of the Board of Elections must possess at least a high school diploma or its equivalency. College level education is desired, and specialized training and/or certification in the various aspects of election administration is to be favored in evaluating applicants. Application: Applicants are requested to demonstrate how they meet the necessary qualifications of the job description when submitting their resume. Interested parties may receive a copy of the job description, evaluation criteria and Ohio Secretary of State Form 307 by visiting the Miami County Board of Elections website at www.miami.ohioboe.com. The website also has the Questionnaire for Prospective Appointment as a Member, Director or Deputy Director of the County Board of Elections (Form No. 307) on it. Any qualified registered Republican may apply by submitting Form 307, along with a current resume, to Miami County Board of Elections, Old Courthouse, 215 West Main Street, Troy, Ohio 45373, or by emailing iridgeway@miamicountyohio.gov. Applications will be accepted until the position is filled.

Director of Elections/General Registrar, Arlington County, Virginia— This is a four-year term position appointed by the Electoral Board with a starting date of July 1, 2019 and an end date of June 30, 2023. The Arlington County Electoral Board is seeking a Director of Elections/General Registrar to provide professional and technical leadership to the Office of Elections and manage the planning, overseeing, and administering of elections in Arlington County. The Director is responsible for ensuring the necessary resources are acquired and in place to maintain the list of registered voters and assure elections are well-prepared and conducted in an accurate, efficient, and transparent manner. Specific duties and responsibilities include: Planning, developing, coordinating, and directing the activities of the Office of Elections, including voter registration; candidate processing and filing; pre-election and Election Day voting; ballot design; equipment programming and testing; poll worker recruitment and training; and voter outreach efforts. Preparing and continuously evaluating the department’s strategic goals and equipment security plan. Supervising permanent and temporary staff of up to 50 individuals, including recruitment, training, scheduling and work assignment, implementation of policies and procedures, performance evaluation, and conflict resolution. Coordinating the administrative processes with the deputy registrar, including but not limited to, budget development and monitoring, County administrative and personnel policies, and technology resources. Consulting and coordinating with County Attorney and Commonwealth’s Attorney as needed on legal issues. Analyzing departmental performance and usage data to make informed projections about future needs, including staffing, space requirements, equipment, and supplies. Providing guidance and technical support to candidates seeking election to local offices, and certifying eligible candidates for elections, including reviewing qualifications and processing of petitions. Managing communication tools including web page, social media, and outreach materials, and ensuring information is accurate and timely. Monitoring legislation introduced at the state and federal levels related to elections and election administration, and providing advice and expertise to legislators as needed. Serving the community and professional organizations as a subject matter expert on elections and election administration; and representing the County at regional, state, and national workshops and conferences. This Director must be self-directed and will have no direct immediate supervisor but will report to and seek guidance from the Arlington County Electoral Board. Additionally, the incumbent will receive guidance and advice from the Virginia Department of Elections as well as from various County departments and is responsible for keeping the Board informed of all relevant matters pertaining to the smooth operation of the department. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Election Technician, Monroe County, Washington— The individual assigned to this classification provides administrative and technical duties related to the election process and voter outreach. This classification is primarily responsible for assisting in all duties required to conduct elections and maintain voter registration. This individual receives significant public contact requiring effective written and oral communication skills and service to the customers. The Auditor’s office is a small office and all staff are crossed trained in Vehicle Licensing and Recording to assist the other departments. Communicates with customers, in person, by phone, and through written correspondence, effectively in English and preferably in Spanish as well. Maintains and updates the Auditor’s Office web presence. Coordinates speaking engagements. Assists public with voter registration process. Maintains a working knowledge of the local voter registration system and ballot processing software. Assists with the election process by issuing replacement ballots, receiving incoming ballots, verifying voters’ signatures, etc. Salary: $3,042 – $3,896/monthly. Deadline: April 5. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

GIS Analyst, Yolo County, California— Yolo County ACE (Assessor/Clerk-Recorder/Elections Department) in coordination with the Yolo County General Services department are recruiting for a G.I.S. Analyst. This recruitment is on-going until filled. Submitted applications will be screened continuously, and those applicants meeting the minimum qualifications will move forward to the Screening for Best Qualified process. This position will work inter-departmentally to develop and implement GIS capabilities in Yolo County ACE. GIS is viewed by County Leadership as an innovative enterprise technology that is positioned to help advance County strategic goals. Recent projects include implementing a new enterprise environment, developing an Elections Night Reporting application, developing mobile applications for polling place reporting, and a migration the ESRI Parcel Fabric. The ideal candidate for this position will be a positive, collaborative, solution-focused individual with excellent interpersonal and customer service skills and the ability to handle and manage multiple priorities. If you feel like you meet these qualifications and you would like to join a dynamic organization committed to supporting an environment where employees feel a true sense of passion, purpose and commitment to their job… Yolo County ACE is where you want to be! Our department strives to honor the public’s trust and redefine excellence through innovation and the commitment of a highly-engaged and empowered team. Check out all the exciting things ACE has going on by visiting our social media pages (Facebook: /YoloACE, Instagram: /YoloCoACE, and Twitter: @YoloCoACE). You can be the next Yolo ACE – come and join our team! Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Project Manager, Hart InterCivic— Project Managers at Hart InterCivic are highly motivated “self-starters” who are enthusiastic about providing exceptional customer service. Working with other members of the Professional Services and Operations teams, the Project Manager directs activity, solves problems, and develops lasting and strong relationships with our customers. Hart InterCivic’s unique and industry known culture of innovation, transparency, and customer-centric focus creates an environment where team members will continually grow and be challenged to develop their careers. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Product Manager, Hart InterCivic — as Product Manager, you will join a team that is charged with product planning, design, and execution throughout the lifecycle of Hart’s products, in support of the company’s overall strategy and goals. This includes: gathering, validating, and prioritizing internal and external customer needs; documenting and communicating product and technical requirements; gathering market and competitive intelligence; supporting the certification, sales, and marketing teams. The Product Manager must possess a unique blend of business and technical savvy – with experience in elections technology or other government-oriented products preferred.  To succeed in this role, the ideal candidate must spend time in the market to understand its unique attributes; demonstrate competence with specialized hardware and software; and find innovative solutions for the broader market. The Product Manager plays a key role in helping others to understand the product positioning, key benefits, and target customer, as well as providing advanced subject matter expertise in using the company’s products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Systems Software Specialist, Yolo County, California — The Elections Branch of Yolo County ACE (Assessor/Clerk-Recorder/Elections Department) in coordination with the Yolo County Information Technology department are recruiting for a Systems Software Specialist. This recruitment is on-going until filled. The Systems Software Specialist class series is responsible for the design, coding, implementation, maintenance and evaluation of computer software. This includes, but is not limited to, operating systems, control systems, proprietary software packages, telecommunications software and database management software. The class also aides in solving problems and achieving the best use of available hardware and software; work with staff to design and implement network segmentation, domain addressing and routing strategies; work with technical staff to ensure effective operations of complex multiple hardware and software configurations; and act as a lead persons over other personnel and program projects and performs related duties as required. If you would like to join a dynamic organization committed to supporting an environment where employees feel a true sense of passion, purpose and commitment to their job… Yolo County ACE is where you want to be! Our department strives to honor the public’s trust and redefine excellence through innovation and the commitment of a highly-engaged and empowered team. Check out all the exciting things ACE has going on by visiting our social media pages (Facebook: /YoloACE, Instagram: /YoloCoACE, and Twitter: @YoloCoACE). You can be the next Yolo ACE – come and join our team! Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Technical Bid Specialist, Scytl — The Technical Bid Specialist is an essential member of the sales team, supporting business development initiatives as well as providing support to the Marketing department. Based in our Tampa Florida, offices, the Technical Bid Specialist is in charge of managing the coordination, completion and handover of tender proposals for our clients and prospects. This is a key position with a great deal of involvement in the sales process and a decisive influence in the achievement of each deal. To be able to perform this task, the Technical Bid Specialist needs to possess a solid technical background, outstanding writing capabilities and proven experience in pre-sales or consulting endeavors, always facing the client and having to put together complex IT proposals or projects. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Training Officer, Collier County, Florida— The purpose of this classification is to provide assistance in the Training & Outreach Department within the Supervisor of Elections office. This position coaches, trains, and educates election workers in accordance with the State of Florida’s election laws and rules. Work involves designing, developing, and delivering multimodal adult learning programs, developing training materials, scheduling training sessions, and recruiting, assigning and evaluating election workers for upcoming election cycles. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Marketplace

electionline provides no guarantees as to the quality of the items being sold and the accuracy of the information provided about the sale items in the Marketplace. Ads are provided directly by sellers and are not verified by electionline. If you have an ad for Marketplace, please email it to: mmoretti@electionline.org

Excess Equipment
Pinal County, Arizona has some excess elections equipment including 19 OS machines and approximately 300 voter booths.

If interested, contact Stephanie Cooper, Pinal County elections supervisor at 520-866-7552 or drop her an email at stephanie.cooper@pinalcountyaz.gov.

 

 

Ballot Scanners
Ballot reader. $500. Buyer will be responsible for pick and shipping to buyer’s location. Contact Wilfred Cochico, purchasing officer City of Lakewood: 562-866-9771 ext. 2640 or via email: WCochico@lakewoodcity.org.

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In Focus This Week

March 14, 2019

March 14, 2019

In Focus This Week

VotingWorks to scale Colorado’s risk limiting audit software to all 50 states
Tool set to help states confirm and secure elections

By M. Mindy Moretti
electionline.org

The common thinking used to be that all you needed to audit an election was a pencil, some paper and basic grasp of 5th grade math. But like many things, common thinking changes over time.

In 2017 Colorado became the first state legally mandated to conduct a post-election risk limiting audit (RLA) and it became clear that a good No. 2 pencil and some scratch paper wasn’t going to cut it.

The Colorado Secretary of State’s Office invested in the development of an open-source RLA tool designed around the cast vote record (CVR) from Dominion Voting Systems and the ballot-comparison method for conducting the audit. The state spent $300,000 of their own money and received a $350,000 grant from the U.S. Election Assistance Commission. The original code was written by Free & Fair with the help and input of subject matter experts that were part of an advisory group. The staff in the secretary of state’s office, according Colorado Elections Director Judd Choate, spent thousands of hours working on the project.

Realizing that they needed more help, Colorado turned to Democracy Works to create a more user-friendly interface for the tool and other enhancements.

“In 2017, Colorado approached us with an urgent need to complete this project before the 2018 midterm elections,” explained Kathryn Peters, co-founder of Democracy Works. “We worried that if we did not take it on, the entire momentum behind RLAs might stall out nationwide.”

Now, after several successful RLAs and with more states considering RLAs, Colorado and Democracy Works are turning the keys over to VotingWorks to make the tool customizable by state, voting system and types of audits.

“The RLA tool we’re currently contributing to is an open-source tool, and we are proud to have made significant contributions on top of the work that Free & Fair did before us,” Peters said. “We’re excited to welcome VotingWorks into the field, share what we’ve learned with them and remain supporting partners in the ecosystem as VotingWorks takes on a leadership role with RLAs.”

Choate said that it was always Colorado’s hope that the RLA software would work for other jurisdictions. He noted that voter confidence in election outcomes is central to a functioning democracy and the Colorado secretary of states’ office believes a risk-limiting audit is the best way to ensure that confidence.

“Monica Childers and Democracy Works did a great job creating a polished version of the RLA code,” Choate said. “Colorado is excited to partner with VotingWorks as they adapt the base code to function for both central and precinct count states and localities.”

Jennifer Morrell, a consultant for the Democracy Fund, has been working with states to implement RLAs while exploring possible solutions for a universal RLA tool. She is excited that VotingWorks has agreed to take on this role and feel like it will be a catalyst for other election audit tools.

“This is a big win for the election community beyond the usefulness to RLAs,” Morrell said. “All of this work around the creation of an RLA tool, from the first version used in Colorado to the forthcoming development done by VotingWorks, represents exactly what we need to solve other challenging problems in election administration. It is a model that embraces technology while focusing on collaboration to create a tool that can be used by everyone to improve the efficiency and accuracy of the work being performed. I think that is something everyone can get behind!”

VotingWorks is a non-partisan nonprofit which started in November 2018 to build secure and affordable voting equipment. Although it’s a young organization VotingWorks founders Ben Adida and Matt Pasternack have years of experience. Adida has been in the election world for 20 years and received his PhD in election security from MIT. Pasternack is an experienced public sector executive, who previously worked with school districts across the country in secure software deployment.

According to Adida, states performing a risk-limiting audit need to coordinate the actions of many stakeholders in a precisely choreographed process—and software is the key to that coordination.

“As more states sought access to [Colorado’s RLA] tool, we offered to help scale the tool by applying our expertise building scalable, reliable, and secure enterprise software,” Adida said. “Because scaling the tool to these new use cases requires a significant software development effort, Democracy Works realized that if VotingWorks took on the RLA tool, Democracy Works could then focus on the more voter-centric aspects of election administration they specialize in.”

Adida said VotingWorks is ready to hit the ground running by consulting broadly with election officials looking to pilot RLAs in the near future. He noted that ultimately, the next generation of RLA tools is going to succeed only if they’re developed in close concert with all stakeholders.

“We know one important thing that won’t change: the source code for the tool and any follow-up tool we build will remain free and open-source,” Adida said. “We’ll be consulting with states to determine a long-term sustainability plan, but that won’t start until we hear from states that the tool has become useful to them and is worth sustaining.”

So what is an RLA and how does the RLA tool work?
Risk limiting audits provide statistical evidence that an election outcome is correct. While there are varying definitions, generally an RLA means officials hand count and review a statistically meaningful sample of the votes cast.

The audit software, Morrell explained, is essential for conducting an RLA at any level. The tool calculates the appropriate number of ballots to audit, assists with the random selection of those ballots, and determines when the audit can stop or if it should be expanded.

According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, three states—Colorado, Rhode Island and Virginia— have a statutory requirement to conduct RLA. Ohio and Washington counties have the option to run RLAs (or other types of post-election audits) and beginning in 2020 California counties will also have the option to conduct RLAs.

NCSL’s election legislation database indicates there are nine bills pending in six states (Indiana, Massachusetts, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island and Virginia) specifically about risk limiting audits and 48 bills in 19 states that have post-election audits as a topic, which is an increase from 2017 but on par with 2018.

If your state is considering undertaking an RLA—or the state Legislature is requiring election officials to do so—Adida recommends you reach out to Jennifer Morrell at jmorrell@democracyfund.org.

VotingWorks would also like to hear from election officials about how they want to use the tool and what they want from it in the future. They can be contacted at rla@voting.works.

“We’re very interested in hearing how you want to use the tool and what you’ll need from it in the future,” Adida said.

(Editor’s Note: We’re taking a brief break from our series on effective communications in elections to cover some “breaking” news over the next couple of weeks. We’ll be back March 21 with more on communications pieces. In the meantime, catch up with our stories in the series: Communications 101 and What makes an effective elections website.)

VVSG Public Comment

VVSG available for public comment

The U.S. Election Assistance Commission’s (EAC) four sitting Commissioners unanimously voted to publish the proposed Voluntary Voting System Guidelines 2.0 (VVSG) Principles and Guidelines in the Federal Register for a 90 day public comment period, after which comments and feedback on the proposed document will be compiled and presented to the Commissioners for discussion and consideration.

“Today’s unanimous vote demonstrates the Commissioners’ shared commitment to taking this next important step in consideration of the proposed VVSG 2.0 Principles and Guidelines. The EAC looks forward to holding hearings on these Principles and Guidelines soon and we encourage the public to provide their feedback on the proposed guidelines,” said EAC Chairman Thomas Hicks, who joined Vice Chair Christy McCormick, Commissioner Ben Hovland and Commissioner Donald Palmer in supporting the measure.

The proposed VVSG 2.0 Principles and Guidelines will be published in the Federal Register in accordance with sections 222(a)(1) and 222(d) of the Help America Vote Act of 2002. They will appear in the Federal Register for a period of 90 days. Separately, upon the completion of the VVSG 2.0’s accompanying Requirements developed by NIST and the EAC, those accompanying Requirements will also be subject to public review and comment, including distribution to the EAC’s Technical Guidelines Development Committee (TGDC), Standards Board and Board of Advisors. This review and comment period will take place prior to consideration and implementation by the Commission.

VVSG are a set of Principles, Guidelines and Requirements against which voting systems can be tested to determine if the systems meet required standards. Some factors examined under these tests include functionality, accessibility, accuracy, auditability and security capabilities.

The Help America Vote Act of 2002 mandates that EAC develop and maintain these requirements as well as testing and certifying voting systems. On December 13, 2005, the EAC unanimously adopted the 2005 VVSG, which significantly increased security requirements for voting systems and expanded access, including opportunities for individuals with disabilities to vote privately and independently. The 2005 guidelines updated and augmented the 2002 Voting System Standards, as required by HAVA, to address advancements in election practices and computer technologies. These guidelines were again updated by the EAC’s Commissioners on March 31, 2015. These guidelines are voluntary. States may decide to adopt them entirely or in part prior to the effective date.

The structure of the new VVSG reflects modifications proposed by the election community, EAC, NIST and the TGDC, which is comprised of election officials, voting system manufacturers, disability experts, cyber security experts, technology experts, and other key election stakeholders. The new guidelines are a high level set of principles that will be supplemented by accompanying documents that detail specific requirements for how systems can meet the new guidelines and obtain certification. The supplemental documents will also detail assertions for how the accredited test laboratories will validate that a system complies with those requirements.

Last Spring, the EAC convened its advisory boards to review and comment on the adoption of the newest version of the voluntary guidelines, VVSG 2.0. Both Boards recommended that the EAC adopt VVSG 2.0. Today’s unanimous Commissioner vote occurred less than two weeks after a quorum of Commissioners was restored at the EAC.

 

Election Security Updates

According to The Hill, Christopher Krebs, director of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), testified before the House Appropriations Committee’s subcommittee on homeland security that the agency’s new “Protect 2020” initiative will focus on making sure that state and local officials are prepared for the upcoming presidential election.

In his testimony, Krebbs said the focus of the project will be on “broadening the reach and depth of assistance to state and local officials” in addition to mphasizing the need to audit elections, patch vulnerabilities in election systems and develop cybersecurity priorities for state and local election officials.

Election News This Week

Starting this spring, voters in the largest election jurisdiction in the largest state in the union will be able to vote at any polling place they want to. Texas Secretary of State David Whitley has approved an application from Harris County to participate in the state’s countywide polling program. “The voters of Harris County have made it clear that a countywide polling place program would have a positive impact on elections and I am confident that the transition to a countywide polling place program will be successful,” County Clerk Diane Trautman said in a statement. According to the Houston Chronicle 50 of Texas’ 254 counties are currently participating in the countywide polling program.

NC9: While most (all) of the attention has been focused on the North Carolina 9th District Congressional race, other races in Bladen County were also impacted by the election fraud case and will have to be conducted again. In addition to the 9th Congressional District, Bladen County Commissioner District 3 and Bladen County Soil and Water Conservation District Supervisor. All other races have been certified. New elections for the two Bladen County races will be held on May 14 in conjunction with the new District 9 race. One local official, Richmond County Manager Bryan Land is protesting the cost of conducting a new election noting that it would cost the county at least $125,000. “I realize we are required by federal law to hold a special election if it is deemed necessary and we are also required by law to pay for all of the associated cost that accompany this election. However, it seems extremely unfair to me that Richmond County is being penalized for the collusion and illegal activities that took place in Bladen and Robeson counties,” Land wrote To Sen Tom McInnis and Rep. Ken Goodman. “The election in Richmond County was certified and no collusion took place within our county. Furthermore, I find it extremely odd that the District 9 race is the only race that is being challenged. If collusion took place in these Counties, would it not be fair to say that ALL races were affected?” The U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of North Carolina has issued subpoenas for the North Carolina State Board of Elections and former candidate Mark Harris. This week, the State Board of Elections recommended changes to the states absentee ballot laws, including consideration of paid postage for return ballots.

While legislation is making its way through the state house that could automatically restore the voting rights to ex-felons, Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds is making things easier in the meantime. The governor’s office recently unveiled a new one-page rights restoration request (replacing a three-page document) and now former incarcerated felons will no longer have to provide their own documentation for the status of their fines because state officials will be able to look that up online. “Restoring voting rights is more than a trip to the ballot box,” Reynolds said according to Iowa Public Radio. “It really resurrects dignity and begins re-entry into life as a contributing member of our communities.”

Virginia Governor Ralph Northam (D) has replaced all three members of the State Board of Elections. The new members are Bob Brink, an aide in former Gov. Terry McAuliffe’s administration and former Democratic member of the House of Delegates from Arlington County; lawyer Jamilah D. LeCruise of Norfolk and former Del. John O’Bannon, R-Henrico.

Personnel News: Paulette Hankins has been appointed director of the Richland County, Ohio board of elections. Jane Ann Hodges has been selected as the new chairperson of the Watauga County, North Carolina Board of Elections. Beth Klein is stepping down as the Wayland, Massachusetts clerk to become the Sudbury clerk. Mina Lusk has retired from the Gordon County, Georgia board of elections.

In Memoriam: Kenneth “Kenny” Brown, Boone County, Kentucky clerk has died. He was 53. Brown, a Republican, was first elected in 2010. On Election Night 2018 Brown suffered a heart attack while overseeing the counting of ballots. “He was very principled,” Sen. John Schickel told The Cincinnati Enquirer. “He was used to swimming upstream, but he enjoyed a good political fight.” Phyllis Sparks told the paper Brown’s legacy is his devotion to his community by bringing live election results and a customer-first friendly atmosphere to the clerk’s office. Chief Deputy Clerk Sandy Helmer said Brown was a thoughtful person and boss. “He had a big heart,” Helmer said. “Kenny wanted everybody to be happy and enjoy life like he did.”

Shirley Johnson, former Orange County, New York Elections Commissioner has died. She was 82. According to MidHudsonNews.com, Johnson served as Republican elections commissioner until her retirement in 1999.

Legislative Updates

Federal Legislation: U.S. Senator Tom Udall (D-New Mexico) and Representative Ben Ray Ljuan (D-New Mexico) have reintroduced the Native American Voting Rights Act. The legislation would enact key measures, such as increasing Native access to voter registration sites and polling locations, and authorizing tribal ID cards for voting purposes. The bill would also bolster Native voter registration, education, and election participation efforts in tribal communities by authorizing a first of its kind Native American Voting Rights Task Force. Finally, the bill addresses the effects of Shelby County v. Holder by prohibiting states from undertaking discriminatory actions without Department of Justice agreement and government-to-government consultation.

California: Assemblywoman Jacqui Irwin (D-Thousand Oaks) has introduced AB 1044 that would authorize the secretary of state’s office to require entities applying for voter registration data to complete a free educational course on data security.

Connecticut: Rep. Vincent Candelora (R-North Brandford) had proposed a bill that would allow schools, when used as polling places, to mandate photo ID for entry into the building if such a requirement is already part of their policy.

Delaware: Legislators are considering a bill that would include Delaware in the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact.

Florida: Sen. Linda Stewart and Rep. Geraldine Thompson have each filed a bill (Senate Bill 1802 and House Bill 1365) would, among other things, make Election Day a state holiday for all state agencies and forbid other employers from denying employees time off with pay to vote on Election Day.

Georgia: The Senate has approved House Bill 316, an omnibus voting bill that would not only tweak state code, but also authorizes the state to purchase new ballot-marking voting equipment. The measure was approved 35-21 along party lines.

Illinois: State Rep. Allen Skillicorn (R-East Dundee) has introduced two bills, HB 2633 would add Illinois to Crosscheck and HB 2632 would enhance criminal penalties for filing more than one vote and make it a felony to vote in different states.

Kentucky: A House committee advanced a bill that would set up an automatic recount if a legislative election’s margin is within 0.5 percent. After the recount, a candidate still contesting the election could take his or her grievances to court. The automatic recount also would apply to statewide constitutional races and Kentucky’s contests for the U.S. Senate and U.S. House.

Maryland: House Bill 423 and Senate Bill 934 would allow students and teachers at public and private high schools who meet the requirements of voter registration to do so at their schools.

Missouri: There are two competing absentee voting bills in the Legislature. Under House Bill 29, a copy of a photo ID would be required when applying by mail for an absentee ballot. Under House Bill 992, voters would no longer need to provide an excuse in order to cast an absentee ballots.

Nebraska: Sen. Megan Hunt has introduced LB163 that would do away with the population lid to conduct vote-by-mail elections and would give election commissioners in all of the state’s 93 counties more flexibility.

New Hampshire: The House has voted to reverse two new voter registration laws although neither have fully taken effect and both are facing court challenges. One of the overturned laws requires voters to provide additional documentation when registering within 30 days of an election and the other related to the difference between domicile and residency. Both now move to the Senate along with a bill allowing for no-excuse absentee voting.

North Carolina: Senate Republicans have introduced a bill that would delay the implementation of the state’s new voter ID until 2020. The House has also approved the bill and it now heads to the desk of Gov. Roy Cooper.

South Carolina: A senate subcommittee did not vote on a  proposal allowing early voting for statewide primaries and general elections. The bill would require at least on early voting site in each county.

Texas: Under House Bill 935, elections in even-numbered years would be a holiday for state employees though most state offices would remain open.

Utah: The Senate Government Operations Committee voted unanimously to send SB242 to the full Senate. Under the proposed legislation, the state’s presidential caucuses would be replaced by a presidential preference primary to be held on Super Tuesday.

House Bill 259, which would eliminate straight-party voting, has passed the House and a Senate committee.

Washington: The Legislature has given final approval to the Native American Voting Rights Act that would allow tribal members to request voter registration services be provided at state and tribal facilities on reservations. Voters could register using those buildings’ addresses or register using nontraditional addresses. They will also be able to register online to vote using their tribal IDs and tribes will be able to request additional ballot drop boxes.

Legal Updates

Florida: Aida Xilomen Rodriguez de Shehab, 71 of Alachua County faces five counts of being an unqualified elector willfully voting and four counts of submitting false voter registration information.

Georgia: A lawsuit filed in the U.S. District Court in Atlanta claims that Gwinnett, Cobb, Fulton and DeKalb counties did not provide enough polling places, voting machines and staff during the 2018 midterm elections. According to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, the suit asks the court to order the counties to enact changes before the 2020 election season that would prevent voters from waiting in “unreasonably long lines” on Election Day and allow staff to more quickly process registration forms and absentee ballot applications.

Michigan: Voting system manufacturer Smartmatic has filed suit against a man living in Wyoming County claiming that the man is working with a special interest group to tarnish the company’s reputation. According to Fox17, the lawsuit alleges the group was paying the Michigan man to edit the Smartmatic Wikipedia page, providing him “false and/or one-sided” information about the company to do so.

New Hampshire: Douglas Carl Smith of Warner has been charged with voting in two different town elections on the same day in 2018.

Also in New Hampshire, the city of Concord and the U.S. Department of Justice have reached an agreement to provide accessible voting facilities for blind and visually impaired voters.

North Carolina: Wake County Superior Court Judge Vince Rozier ruled that the case against the state’s voter ID law must be transferred to a three-judge panel because the litigation filed by several voters challenges the law’s constitutionality for all voters lacking an ID.

Texas: Harris County and the U.S. Department of Justice have reached an agreement over inadequate access to polling places for voters with disabilities. According to the Houston Chronicle, under the agreement Harris County will have to make minor accessibility improvements to as many as 300 of its 750 regular voting sites, hire two outside election experts to supervise balloting and designate an in-house Americans with Disabilities Act compliance officer. The county does not have to concede it has violated the ADA in past elections.

Opinions This Week

National Opinions: Voting rights, II | HR 1, II, III, IV | Suffrage | Election reform | Voting age | War on democracy

Arizona: Obstacles to voting

California: Voting age

Colorado: National popular vote

Florida: Election reform, II, III | Voter registration

Georgia: Election legislation | Secretary of state | Voting machines

Hawaii: Election reform

Illinois: Ranked choice voting

Indiana: Paper ballots

Iowa: Vote-by-mail| Ex-felon voting rights | Election legislation

Maine: National popular vote | Ranked choice voting

Massachusetts: Ranked choice voting

Minnesota: Ex-felon voting rights

New Jersey: Ex-felon voting rights

North Carolina: Election fraud, II, III

Ohio: Young voters | Election security

Oregon: Dennis Richardson | Secretary of state

Pennsylvania: Election security | Voting system

Texas: Voting machines | Voter fraud

Virginia: Election reform

Wisconsin: Automatic voter registration

Upcoming Events

Unrig Summit 2019 — This is no ordinary conference. Unrig is fast-paced, solutions-oriented, and fun. No boring speeches — 2019’s lineup has more trainings, more workshops, more tools to power you up. Featuring America’s most powerful presenters, expert trainers, activists, musicians, artists and more, we’re bringing together the brightest minds from the right and left to build a new political future for America. 3 days. 2 nights. 1 vision: Unrig the System. Where: Nashville, TN When: Fri March 29 – Sun March 31.

Election Center Special Workshop —The Election Center will hold a special workshop that will include: Course 9 (Enfranchisement, Enhancement, Enforcement ); Course 10 (Constitution, Courts & Cases to 1965); and Renewal Course 14 (Crisis Management). Where: Virginia Beach. When: April 24-28.

Election Mail Forum One-Day Conference — you are invited to participate in a special one-day Election Mail Forum exclusively at the National Postal Forum, Monday May 6, 2019 at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis Indiana. Come see community leaders showcase election mail. Don’t miss the opportunity to learn and network with Postal Service Leadership, State Election Executives, and election mail preparation vendors. Learn how to Leverage USPS Addressing Products to improve voter roll quality. Come learn about Full Service, STID, IMb— an alternative for “postmark” authentication. When: May 6. Where: Indianapolis.

National Association of Secretaries Of State — The National Association of Secretaries of State will hold their annual summer conference in late June, early July in New Mexico. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registrations. When: June 30-July 3. Where: Santa Fe, New Mexico.

International Association of Government Officials — IGO’s 2019 Annual Conference will be held in Houston, Texas, July 11-17. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of Counties — NACo’s 2019 Annual Conference will be held in Clark County (Las Vegas), Nevada July 11-15, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of State Election Directors — The NASED Summer Conference will be held in Austin, Texas, July 14-16, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

Job Postings This Week

electionlineWeekly publishes election administration job postings each week as a free service to our readers. To have your job listed in the newsletter, please send a copy of the job description, including a web link to mmoretti@electionline.org.  Job postings must be received by 5pm on Wednesday in order to appear in the Thursday newsletter. Listings will run for three weeks or till the deadline listed in the posting.

Assistant County Clerk-Registrar of Voters, Butte County, California — the Assistant County Clerk-Registrar of Voters directs, plans, manages, and coordinates the staff and operations of the County Clerk-Registrar of Voters Division. This single incumbent position is responsible for the management, technical and operational functions of the County Clerk-Registrar of Voter’s Division and reports to the County Clerk-Recorder-Registrar of Voters. Salary: $96,720.00—$129,625.60 annually. Deadline: March 15. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Clerk of the Board/Elections Director, Santa Cruz County, Arizona — Under the direction of the Santa Cruz County Board of Supervisors and guidance from the Santa Cruz County Manager, performs statutory duties of the Clerk of the Board pursuant to ARS 11-241 and other statutory duties, to include preparing, publishing and posting the agenda for the Board of Supervisor meetings.  Under limited supervision, performs work of considerable difficulty to plan, organize, coordinate, direct and manage all activities of the Santa Cruz County Elections Department in compliance with applicable laws, rules and regulations. This is an at-will position. Plans, organizes, coordinates, directs and manages all activities of the Santa Cruz County Elections Department in compliance with applicable laws, rules, and regulations; oversees daily operations and programing; develops and administers departmental budget and oversees expenditures, develops and administers training and education for election staff and volunteers.  Develops and implements procedural and technical improvements as they relate to elections; ensures quality control of all aspects of election from ballot production to public information; manages projects, coordinates with other county/state departments and outside vendors. Salary: $69,186. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Deputy Director, Washington Secretary of State’s Office— this position reports to the certification and training program manager and is responsible for overseeing, reviewing and advising county auditors on the federal and state elections laws and the administration of voter registration.  Serves as the lead program specialist in the required election administrator certification program; Certifies state and local election administrators following a series of classes and tests. Participates in the elections training program and county election review program; travels extensively throughout the state to conduct reviews of county elections departments. Participates in the initiative and referenda filing and clearinghouse advisories program. Provide support to Washington State counties on election processes, county WEI systems, and logic and accuracy test program. Salary: $4,275.00 – $5,745.00 Monthly. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Deputy Director, Center for Election Innovation & Research — the Deputy Director will report to the Executive Director and have a broad range of responsibilities designed to support CEIR’s mission. In this position, the Deputy Director will play an integral role in the development and execution of CEIR’s programming, strategic communications, and continued growth as an organization. This is an excellent opportunity for an experienced and highly motivated individual who wants to make a substantial, positive, nonpartisan impact on elections and American democracy. The Deputy Director’s primary workplace will be CEIR’s Washington, DC office. The Deputy Director also must be available for business travel as needed. CEIR believes that working alongside and understanding the diverse mix of people who are affected by elections and American democracy is key to achieving our mission. That’s why we’re proud to be an equal opportunity employer committed to creating a diverse, non-discriminatory work environment. We recruit, employ, train, compensate, and promote regardless of race, religion, color, national origin, sex, disability, age, veteran status, and other protected status as required by applicable law. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Director, Miami County, Ohio Board of Elections— The Miami County Board of Elections is seeking applicants for the position of Director. This position, in cooperation with the Deputy Director, is responsible for overseeing, directing and managing the Board of Elections Office; developing, recommending, and adhering to an annual budget; and conducting fair and impartial elections. Qualified candidates must be affiliated with the Republican Party, reside within Miami County or be able to relocate within 30 days of accepting the position. Applicants must agree to a background check. A candidate for Director of the Board of Elections must possess at least a high school diploma or its equivalency. College level education is desired, and specialized training and/or certification in the various aspects of election administration is to be favored in evaluating applicants. Salary: The base salary for the director position will be $49,899 or DOQ, plus benefits.Application: Applicants are requested to demonstrate how they meet the necessary qualifications of the job description when submitting their resume. Interested parties may receive a copy of the job description, evaluation criteria and Ohio Secretary of State Form 307 by visiting the Miami County Board of Elections website at miami.ohioboe.com. The website also has the Questionnaire for Prospective Appointment as a Member, Director or Deputy Director of the County Board of Elections (Form No. 307) on it. Any qualified registered Republican may apply by submitting Form 307, along with a current resume, to Miami County Board of Elections, Old Courthouse, 215 West Main Street, Troy, Ohio 45373, or by emailing iridgeway@miamicountyohio.gov. Applications will be accepted until the position is filled.

Director, Voting System Testing and Certification, U.S. Election Assistance Commission— the purpose of EAC’s national voting system certification program is to independently verify that voting systems applying to the EAC program comply with the functional capabilities, accessibility, and security requirements necessary to ensure the integrity and reliability of the voting system, as established in the Voluntary Voting System Guidelines. The incumbent of this position is a first line supervisor for the Voting System Testing and Certification (VST&C) Division. Salary: $96,970 to $125,967 per year. Deadline: March 20. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Deputy Director, Oregon Secretary of State’s Office— exciting career opportunity! The Oregon Secretary of State Elections Division in recruiting for elections deputy director. The primary purpose of this position is to assist the Division Director in the execution of the statutory responsibilities and general operations of the Elections Division. Collaborate with the Elections Director to develop the Division’s budget, organizational goals and objectives as well as advance the direction of the Division. As the subject matter expert, oversee and coordinate the conduct of elections at the state and local level. Perform supervisory functions including but not limited to: hiring, training/coaching, planning, assigning, prioritizing and reviewing work, evaluating performance, implementing disciplinary action and responding to complaints. Salary: $6,480-$10,024 monthly. Deadline: March 18. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Specialist, Pinal County, Arizona— Perform a variety of paraprofessional and technical functions in the administration and support of the elections functions for Pinal County under general supervision. Typical classification essential duties include: Prepare contacts, assign poll worker notices, create notices advising poll workers to which Voting Precincts they have been assigned, and review and verify that confirmation from poll worker is received by deadline. Coordinate payroll for poll workers, in-house election boards, and troubleshooters and prepare payments for poll workers. Conduct poll worker classes and update poll worker instruction manual based on changes in legislation, equipment, etc. for each election cycle. Submit agenda items to approve poll worker assignments, polling locations, canvassing, and other assignments and conduct election troubleshooter training on proper Election Day procedures. Contract with various entities for the use of buildings for polling locations, research area to be voted in, and locate facilities with adequate space for use on Election Day. Coordinate and send notices to all cities, towns, school districts, and special taxing districts advising of the dates for the upcoming year and provide a time schedule to submit requests to the department for election assistance. Draft and publish required legal notices in local newspapers. Process and submit accounts payable, federal grant reports and billing, and other various reporting to the State election division for processing. Provide basic technical support to the automated electronic voting machines and ensure voting equipment is maintained and operates properly for election. Assist with ballot creation duties including proofreading all ballot styles, sending ballot proofs to candidates and jurisdictions, working with translators for accurate translations, and creating and reviewing ballot orders. Assist with ballot tabulation duties, including election night reporting, post-election audits, hand counts, and preparation of the official election canvass documents. Assemble election supply cages for every polling place that includes voting materials and needed supplies for Election Day, and assist with delivery to and from the polling places. Assist with customer service duties via email, phone, face-to-face interactions and public records requests. Assist with candidate filings, nomination papers, financial disclosure statements along with campaign finance reports. Salary: $39,411-$44,337. Deadline: March 20. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Election Technician, Monroe County, Washington— The individual assigned to this classification provides administrative and technical duties related to the election process and voter outreach. This classification is primarily responsible for assisting in all duties required to conduct elections and maintain voter registration. This individual receives significant public contact requiring effective written and oral communication skills and service to the customers. The Auditor’s office is a small office and all staff are crossed trained in Vehicle Licensing and Recording to assist the other departments. Communicates with customers, in person, by phone, and through written correspondence, effectively in English and preferably in Spanish as well. Maintains and updates the Auditor’s Office web presence. Coordinates speaking engagements. Assists public with voter registration process. Maintains a working knowledge of the local voter registration system and ballot processing software. Assists with the election process by issuing replacement ballots, receiving incoming ballots, verifying voters’ signatures, etc. Salary: $3,042 – $3,896/monthly. Deadline: April 5. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

GIS Analyst, Yolo County, California— Yolo County ACE (Assessor/Clerk-Recorder/Elections Department) in coordination with the Yolo County General Services department are recruiting for a G.I.S. Analyst. This recruitment is on-going until filled. Submitted applications will be screened continuously, and those applicants meeting the minimum qualifications will move forward to the Screening for Best Qualified process. This position will work inter-departmentally to develop and implement GIS capabilities in Yolo County ACE. GIS is viewed by County Leadership as an innovative enterprise technology that is positioned to help advance County strategic goals. Recent projects include implementing a new enterprise environment, developing an Elections Night Reporting application, developing mobile applications for polling place reporting, and a migration the ESRI Parcel Fabric. The ideal candidate for this position will be a positive, collaborative, solution-focused individual with excellent interpersonal and customer service skills and the ability to handle and manage multiple priorities. If you feel like you meet these qualifications and you would like to join a dynamic organization committed to supporting an environment where employees feel a true sense of passion, purpose and commitment to their job… Yolo County ACE is where you want to be! Our department strives to honor the public’s trust and redefine excellence through innovation and the commitment of a highly-engaged and empowered team. Check out all the exciting things ACE has going on by visiting our social media pages (Facebook: /YoloACE, Instagram: /YoloCoACE, and Twitter: @YoloCoACE). You can be the next Yolo ACE – come and join our team! Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Project Manager, Hart InterCivic— Project Managers at Hart InterCivic are highly motivated “self-starters” who are enthusiastic about providing exceptional customer service. Working with other members of the Professional Services and Operations teams, the Project Manager directs activity, solves problems, and develops lasting and strong relationships with our customers. Hart InterCivic’s unique and industry known culture of innovation, transparency, and customer-centric focus creates an environment where team members will continually grow and be challenged to develop their careers. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Product Manager, Hart InterCivic — as Product Manager, you will join a team that is charged with product planning, design, and execution throughout the lifecycle of Hart’s products, in support of the company’s overall strategy and goals. This includes: gathering, validating, and prioritizing internal and external customer needs; documenting and communicating product and technical requirements; gathering market and competitive intelligence; supporting the certification, sales, and marketing teams. The Product Manager must possess a unique blend of business and technical savvy – with experience in elections technology or other government-oriented products preferred.  To succeed in this role, the ideal candidate must spend time in the market to understand its unique attributes; demonstrate competence with specialized hardware and software; and find innovative solutions for the broader market. The Product Manager plays a key role in helping others to understand the product positioning, key benefits, and target customer, as well as providing advanced subject matter expertise in using the company’s products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Systems Software Specialist, Yolo County, California — The Elections Branch of Yolo County ACE (Assessor/Clerk-Recorder/Elections Department) in coordination with the Yolo County Information Technology department are recruiting for a Systems Software Specialist. This recruitment is on-going until filled. The Systems Software Specialist class series is responsible for the design, coding, implementation, maintenance and evaluation of computer software. This includes, but is not limited to, operating systems, control systems, proprietary software packages, telecommunications software and database management software. The class also aides in solving problems and achieving the best use of available hardware and software; work with staff to design and implement network segmentation, domain addressing and routing strategies; work with technical staff to ensure effective operations of complex multiple hardware and software configurations; and act as a lead persons over other personnel and program projects and performs related duties as required. If you would like to join a dynamic organization committed to supporting an environment where employees feel a true sense of passion, purpose and commitment to their job… Yolo County ACE is where you want to be! Our department strives to honor the public’s trust and redefine excellence through innovation and the commitment of a highly-engaged and empowered team. Check out all the exciting things ACE has going on by visiting our social media pages (Facebook: /YoloACE, Instagram: /YoloCoACE, and Twitter: @YoloCoACE). You can be the next Yolo ACE – come and join our team! Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Technical Bid Specialist, Scytl — The Technical Bid Specialist is an essential member of the sales team, supporting business development initiatives as well as providing support to the Marketing department. Based in our Tampa Florida, offices, the Technical Bid Specialist is in charge of managing the coordination, completion and handover of tender proposals for our clients and prospects. This is a key position with a great deal of involvement in the sales process and a decisive influence in the achievement of each deal. To be able to perform this task, the Technical Bid Specialist needs to possess a solid technical background, outstanding writing capabilities and proven experience in pre-sales or consulting endeavors, always facing the client and having to put together complex IT proposals or projects. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Marketplace

electionline provides no guarantees as to the quality of the items being sold and the accuracy of the information provided about the sale items in the Marketplace. Ads are provided directly by sellers and are not verified by electionline. If you have an ad for Marketplace, please email it to: mmoretti@electionline.org

Excess Equipment
Pinal County, Arizona has some excess elections equipment including 19 OS machines and approximately 300 voter booths. If interested, contact Stephanie Cooper, Pinal County elections supervisor at 520-866-7552 or drop her an email at stephanie.cooper@pinalcountyaz.gov.

Ballot Scanners
Ballot reader. $500. Buyer will be responsible for pick and shipping to buyer’s location. Contact Wilfred Cochico, purchasing officer City of Lakewood: 562-866-9771 ext. 2640 or via email: WCochico@lakewoodcity.org.

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