electionline Weekly

October 11, 2018

October 11, 2018

In Focus This Week

Election 2018 Preview: Ballot measures
Voting on how we vote

By M. Mindy Moretti
Electionline

On November 6, in addition to political races, voters in 38 states will decide 157 statewide ballot measures and countless other local initiatives and referendums.

There will be the usual suspects like pot, taxes Medicaid expansion, and the minimum wage. But in addition there will be eight statewide ballot measures on election reform covering everything from photo ID to early voting to ballot collection.

In addition to the statewide elections-related ballot measures there will also be at least nine local elections-related ballot measures covering everything from lowering the voting age to non-citizen voting to ranked choice voting.

Here is a snapshot of how voters will be voting on voting on November 6.

Statewide Measures
Arkansas: Voters will decide on State Issue 2 which if approved would require voters to present a valid photo ID to cast non-provisional ballots in person or absentee. This amendment was referred to the ballot by the House after other voter ID laws were overturned by the courts.

Florida: Amendment 4 would automatically restore the voting rights to about 1.4 million Floridians who have completed the terms of their felony convictions. The exceptions would be those who were convicted of murder or felony sexual offense. Polls have indicated that the Amendment has wide support.

Maryland: Question 2 would allow the state Legislature to amend the state constitution in order to allow for registration at polling places on election day. Currently the state allows for same-day registration at vote centers during early voting.

Michigan: This citizen lead-initiative (Proposal 3) would amend the constitution to implement no-reason absentee voting, give military members additional time to vote, let citizens register to vote anytime with proof of residency, allow straight party voting, protect secret ballots and require audits for election results.

Montana: This legislatively referred state statue (Montana LR-129) would ban  persons from collecting the election ballots of other people, with exceptions for certain individuals. Exceptions include election officials, postal service workers or others authorized to transmit mail, caregivers, family members, household members and individuals known by the voter.

Nevada: Question 5 is an indirect initiated state statute that would provide for the automatic voter registration of eligible citizens when receiving certain services from the Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles.

North Carolina: After a protracted legal battle and a contentious legislative session voters will make the ultimate decision on North Carolina’s Voter ID Amendment. If approved, voters would be required to show a photo ID in order to cast a ballot in future elections.

North Dakota: Measure 2, an initiated constitutional amendment would amend the state’s constitution to clarify that only U.S. citizens are eligible to vote in federal, state and local elections.

Local Measures
California: Voters in the City of Los Angeles will decide whether or not they want to amend the city’s charter (Charter Amendment E) so that the city’s primary election date will align with the state’s primary election, held in March of even-numbered years. The amendment would also make other related and technical changes to the city election procedures.

Colorado: Voters in the City of Golden will decide whether or not they want to amend sections 3.4 and 15.14k of the Home Rule Charter (Ballot Question 2E) to allow the city council to enact an ordinance that would allow 16- and 17-year-olds to vote in municipal elections while retaining the current requirement that council members be at least 18-years-old.

Also in Colorado, residents of Denver will decide whether or not they want to amend the city and county’s charter (Measure 2B) to change the required number of signatures for initiatives from a percentage of votes cast in the last mayoral election to a percentage of registered voters in Denver. If approved, the amendment would also lengthen the city council’s review and comment period for proposed initiatives.

Illinois: After surviving a legal challenge, voters in the City of Bloomington will vote on whether or not the city’s election commission should be abolished and the McLean County clerk’s office take over the administration of elections for the city.

New Mexico: Residents in the City of Santa Fe will decide whether or not to move the city’s elections from spring to the fall. Voter approval of the charter amendment would establish new odd-year elections and change the beginning and end dates for elected municipal officeholders.

North Dakota: Fargo’s Measure 1 would change the city’s voting system from plurality voting to approval voting allowing voters to vote for any number of candidates they choose in a local election.

Ohio: Voters in the City of Akron will vote whether or not amend their city’s charter (Issue 9) to move the city’s primary municipal elections to the first Tuesday after the first Monday in May.

Tennessee: After months of back-and-forth within the Memphis city council, the residents of Memphis will now weigh in on Referendum Ordinance 6577, which if approved will repeal the city’s use of run-off elections and establish that the candidate with the most votes, wins.

Oregon: Residents of Lane County will decide if they want to move to the STAR method of voting for non-partisan elections. STAR stands for, Score, Then Automatic Runoff. Using the STAR method, ballots would list every candidate and allow voters to score them zero to five. The two highest scoring candidates are the finalists for an automatic runoff. Your vote goes to whichever of those two received your higher score.

Vermont: Residents in Montpelier will decide if they want to join a small, but growing handful of municipalities that allow documented non-citizens to vote in local elections.

 

Tammy's Blog

My 2018 Summer Vacation

By Tammy Patrick, senior advisor
Democracy Fund

As the leaves begin to turn, the nights get cooler, and we head into the Midterms, I can’t help but look back on the summer of 2018. Even though my summer was filled with airports, hotel ballrooms, conference tables and PowerPoints instead of hammocks and sand and stacks of book that beckon to be read, it was a GREAT summer.

My summer helps me sleep better at night knowing about all the thoughtful, diligent, effort being put into ensuring our democratic process is secure without sacrificing access. When not in the office working toward the relaunch of electionline and the network platform, I was out in the election profession wild. Here are some of the highlights from “My Summer Vacation”:

Summer Playlist: Media  
I grew up during the mix-tape era, each song carefully chosen and placed in just the right order to convey the intended sentiment for the audience. The Midterm Election is upon us and for the last few months I have been working with Poynter, ElectionLand, and the Shorenstein School of Journalism at Harvard University to contemplate the messages we present to the public about our elections, their requirements, and their integrity. Assembling the Top Hits of the Summer included publication of the 8 Tips for Covering Elections, a free webinar for journalists Democracy on a Deadline, and entreating journalists to help debunk myths that persist such as that absentee (or provisional) ballots are only counted “if the election is close,” and to cover voting options early on in the election cycle rather than the last few days of early voting when we know there will be lines. I spent many hours in past summers waiting in line at Ticketmaster for sales to open (remember THAT?), but generally lines are not a good thing.

Summer “Romance”: #ElectionGeeks
Do election process models and detailed schemas of complex election functions make your heart sing? Do you carve the initials CDF (for Common Data Formats) into tree trunks? Probably not, but luckily for all of us there are enough dedicated #ElectionGeeks who suffer from this ailment that we have seen the culmination of years of work come to fruition over the summer in the publication of “America’s Election Model: The Architecture of Elections”—a126 pages of detailed mapping of our electoral process. This technical work may not be for everyone, so Democracy Fund has enlisted the aid of Oxide Design and will soon be releasing a primer on a handful of procedures, along with PowerPoint templates that election officials can use to educate the public on exactly what happens in their democracy.

One of the processes we will be highlighting is the way that voters are placed in their voting precincts and districts, something that has been in the news a bit during the summer primary season. Governing Magazine published An Opportunity to Make Every Vote Count as a clarion call for modernizing this process before the next round of redistricting. Democracy Fund Voice is currently working with grantee National States Geographic Information Council (NSGIC) to help forge relationships between state GIS departments and election officials so that we can more efficiently, and accurately, place and maintain voters in the appropriate political geographies.

No discussion of #ElectionGeek’ery would be complete without mentioning the partnership with academics—the political scientists, engineers, mathematicians, and computer scientists who help to inform data-driven election administration. From the State Certification Testing of Voting Systems National Conference convening hosted by Ball State and the North Carolina Board of Elections to the Election Sciences, Reform, & Administration (ESRA) conference hosted this year by the University of Wisconsin, dozens of election officials and academics met this summer to think deeply about election technologies, scatter-plots, registration data, and a myriad of other topics. The beauty of both of these meetings, in addition to their collaborative nature and relationship building, is that the majority of the content is available to everyone. I was fortunate enough to travel to Raleigh and to Madison, but the materials are viewable to all.

Road trip!: Access & Security  
Denver, Tampa, Minneapolis, Reno, Boston, Philadelphia, San Antonio, Williamsburg—this summer was like a good Johnny Cash song. And like most country songs, there is tension. In elections we have always felt the pull between access and security and how do we balance what can be seen as conflicting perspectives and motivations. But, as with most worthwhile efforts, commitment and determination can uncover solutions and a path forward.

Access can mean many things.  Have you ever had to read, and then potentially re-read, a ballot proposition or referendum? (Maybe more than a couple of times before you felt that you REALLY understood what the question was?) Now consider how that would feel if English wasn’t your first language. Hearing the challenges, and dedication, of administering language assistance to Alaskan Natives by translators, pollworkers, and the State Board of Elections was one of the highlights of 2018 when I was asked to speak at the State’s first Language Summit. It was a moving experience and we were honored to have Indra Arriaga from the Alaska Division of Elections and Walkie Charles from the University of Alaska join us in the “lower 48” for this year’s Democracy Fund Voice and Election Assistance Commission’s Language Access for Voters Summit 2018.  Informing voters and ensuring access to the franchise for all eligible citizens means breaking down the hurtles of language, the barriers of format for voters with assistive needs, the obstacles of time and distance for military and overseas voters.

Security is top of mind for election officials, for voters. It is important to know that this is not a new topic for the profession, but that the level of sophistication of our adversaries is better understood now and election officials are taking advantage of the resources provided to them. Playbooks by Belfer and Center for Internet Security are widely distributed, webinar training collaborations by Center for Technology in Civic Life and the Center for Democracy and Technology have instructed hundreds of election officials, and helpful guides like the one published by the Council of State Governments are informing many levels of state governments on the securing of the franchise. State association meetings and conferences leverage the resources to inform their members.

My last trip of the summer was to Colorado for their election cybersecurity table-top exercise (TTX), based on the Belfer model, which condensed 180 days of the election process into a two hour TTX.  It was a sight to see. The room echoed the cacophony of being in Hot Line Command Centers on Election Day with injections of cyber-attacks, system failures, fires and other natural disasters taking out polling places. Aside from the fabulous neon-green safety vest that I was asked to wear to identify my role as moderator – I posed as a chaos agent/journalist/voter/advocate/hacker – the experience was amazing. My highlight? When each of the polling locations in the room were lost I went around the room asking about the accessibility of the replacement facilities for voters with disabilities. Without skipping a beat the local officials provided me with perfect responses: they moved the site to a nearby back-up location that was already pre-surveyed to be certain it complied with the ADA, that they would position signage or a pollworker/staff at the old location directing voters to the new location, or that they had an ADA-compliant mobile unit that they were deploying and would have at the same address so no change for voters. It made me want to “Cry, Cry, Cry” with happiness.

Letters (& Postcards) Home: USPS  
You didn’t really think I would write a blog without a mention of USPS, did you? My summer kicked off at the National Postal Forum where, for the first time ever, we had a full day of election mail content. Even though we were in the midst of primary season, there were more than a dozen states represented in the room—industry representatives noticed that we were the only tract of content that was visited by every Postal Vice President as well as the Deputy Postmaster General. “Delivering Democracy” has been my mantra, for tens of millions of voters they don’t get their ballot from a pollworker, but rather, from their postal carrier. Together with Democracy Works we created electionmail.org as an issue resolution tool for election officials. This summer demonstrated that years of partnership and collaboration continues to pay off when USPS rolled out a new Service Type Identifier (STID) for ballots to enable better tracking of official ballots and improved services in those critical final days. It will be in use in November.

So, yeah.  I do sleep better at night.  It may be because of all of that I have seen, all the heady (& often uber wonky) conversations, all of the passionate tête-à-têtes that I have had with election officials soldiering on to protect our elections. Or, just maybe, it is all of those things and also that I am, quite simply, exhausted.

 

Federal-State Updates

In a hearing before a Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee this week, Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kristjen Nielsen clarified remarks she made last week during a cybersecurity summit and sought to assure the panel that DHS is doing all it can to secure the upcoming election.

She did acknowledge that China is attempting to influence the election.

“China absolutely is exerting unprecedented effort to influence American opinion,” Nielsen said, adding that “we have not seen to date any Chinese attempts to compromise election infrastructure.”

 

Election News This Week

A Deschutes County, Oregon woman recently discovered the importance of a shredder. She was out of town during the January special election earlier this year and so her husband put her uncast ballot in the recycling bin. Someone fished it out, filled it out, forged her signature and cast it. Fortunately elections workers for the county caught the mismatched signature and reached out to the voter to confirm that it was not her. Deschutes County Clerk Nancy Blankenship had this advice, “If you receive your ballot and you’re not interested in participating for some reason, it would be ideal probably for you to shred that so people can’t gain access to it.”

It’s back-to-school for members of the Alabama Board of Registrars! Secretary of State John Merrill has asked all registrars to visit any institution of higher learning in their respective counties before October 22 to conduct voter registration drives. Even if the registrars have already visited the schools this year, Merrill is asking them to return one last time before the voter registration deadline.

Get’em any way you can! In the days leading up to Georgia’s voter registration deadline, the City of South Fulton offered residents who registered to vote or confirmed their voter registration status $50 discounts on outstanding citations. The discount was offered by the city prosecutor’s office. “I feel it is the responsibility of the courts to educate the citizens before it, including in the area of participating in elections. We did not force anyone to accept the reduced fee if they provided the paperwork,” Solicitor LaDawn Jones told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. “Further, I did not inquire about their political preference or mention any candidate or campaign.” Mayor Bill Edwards expressed concerns and said he would seek a legal review.

Well, they meant well. The Linn County, Iowa auditor’s office reports that nearly  500 voters have returned marked copies of the sample ballot they received. According to Iowa Public Radio, the office has mailed letters to those who returned the ballots, although 40 of them did not include return addresses. Still, Auditor Joel Miller told IPR, that the mailing was worth the effort. “We’ve had over 3,000 additional absentee ballot requests that we probably wouldn’t see had we not sent that mailer out,” Miller said. “So lots of people followed the instructions and a very few, less than a percent, did not follow the instructions.”

No one is certain how the rumor got started, but Monmouth County, New Jersey Clerk Christine Giordano Hanlon is trying to put a stop to it. It seems a rumor is floating around Facebook that “thousands” of voters received incorrect vote-by-mail ballots for the November election and if they inadvertently cast the wrong ballot, their vote won’t count. “It’s false. It’s just false,” she told the Asbury Park Press. “Whoever posted it is causing voter crisis when it doesn’t — it’s just fake.” Hanlon said her office has received fewer than 10 calls from voters concerned about potentially getting an incorrect ballot and that it does occasionally happen since vote-by-mail ballots are hand-processed.

Ride-sharing giant Uber has joined Lyft in offering free rides to the polls on Election Day. In addition the free rides, Uber has also created a polling place button their app to help riders find where they need to go to cast a ballot. “With the 2018 elections around the corner, many organizations and companies across the country are going the extra mile to support our democratic process,” Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi wrote in a blog post. “Using our technology and resources, we can help make it easier for every Uber rider in the US to get to their polling place at the push of a button.”

 

Legislative Updates

Minnesota: The Tower city council has approved giving a letter of reprimand to Tower City Clerk-Treasurer Linda Keith as well as requiring her to pay any fines stemming from the mishandling of the August primary.

Mississippi: The Senate Judiciary Committee recently held a hearing on the state’s lifetime felon voting rights ban. According to WDAM, Judiciary B Chairman Hob Bryan would like the issue to get more study. He doesn’t know that a change will come in 2019 legislative session but he wants to continue the discussions.

Ohio: The Franklin County board of commissioners will vote this week on whether or not pay for public-service announcements promoting early voting. The council vote comes after the county board of elections decided not to spend money on an early voting campaign.

Virginia: Del. Margaret Ransone (R- District 99) has pre-filed HB620 that would reform the state board of elections. Under the legislation, the board would increase from three to six members that would be appointed by the governor. The appointees would also have the power to choose the state elections commissioner as well as remove them from the position.

 

Legal Updates

National News: The FBI has arrested a New York man who built a 200-lb bomb in his home and said that he planned to blow it, and himself, up on the National Mall in Washington, DC on Election Day to support his political views.

Florida: Two lawsuits have been filed in an effort to extend the voter registration deadline for those affected by Hurricane Michael.

Also in Florida, a former employee of the Martin County supervisor of elections office has filed suit alleging that Supervisor of Elections Vicki Davis violated the Florida Whistle-blower’s Act for firing him after speaking up about failing equipment, security breaches and improper use of taxpayer money, including Davis’ use of county employees to babysit her elderly mother.

Illinois: A county clerk candidate has filed a lawsuit against the DuPage Election Commission to obtain the serial numbers of optical scan voting machines the agency received as part of a settlement with a former vendor.

Indiana: According to The Indiana Lawyer, Judge Tanya Walton Pratt issued an order last week in Common Cause Indiana v. Connie Lawson, et al., 1:17-cv-03936, denying the state’s request to stay proceedings and discovery while the case is on interlocutory appeal to the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals.

Missouri: Senior Circuit Judge Richard Callahan has upheld most of the state’s voter ID law but did bar the state from requiring voters without an ID from signing a statement he deemed “misleading.” Callahan ruled that the state could not require “voters otherwise qualified to cast a regular ballot” to sign the sworn statement the way it’s currently written if they didn’t have a photo ID. He said it “impermissibly infringes on a citizen’s right to vote as guaranteed under the Missouri Constitution.” The state has said it will appeal.

New Jersey: A candidate for Senate has sued the Middlesex County Clerk for rejecting hundreds of vote-by-mail applications. According to a press release from the Hugin campaign, 20 of the state’s 21 counties accept pre-printed applications for vote-by-mail ballots that contain a pre-printed assistor signature, with Middlesex being the one hold out.

North Dakota: The United States Supreme Court has declined to intervene in the battle of North Dakota’s voter ID law, which requires voter present ID with a current street address. Justices Ginsburg and Kagan both dissented from the court’s decision not to intervene.

Ohio: Senior U.S. District Judge George Smith has ruled that notification forms Ohio sends to voters in its process to remove inactive voters from the rolls are in fact compliant with federal law.

Tennessee: A lawsuit has been filed against the Shelby County election commission arguing that the three city referendums on the ballot next month, including one on the city’s use of ranked choice voting, are written in such a manner that they may be confusing to voters. “They’re down right misleading,” plaintiff and former city council candidate Erika Sugarmon told WREG. “And we wonder why we have apathetic voters.”

U.S. Territories: The U.S. Supreme Court declined to review Segovia v. United States. The suit centered on voting rights for Americans in the U.S. territories. The case questioned why the Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act, which allows former state residents to continue to vote while living in some U.S. territories and foreign countries, excludes residents living on Guam, the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico.

 

Tech Thursday

Tech Companies: EasyVote Solutions, a startup that develops election management software and is based in North Carolina just got a $1.5 million shot in the arm from the investment firm CoFounders Capital. EasyVote says it will use the capital to expand its operations across the US in support of local and state elections. The firm, which launched in 2015, already works with elections officials in 13 states.

California: Secretary of State Alex Padilla has called for an independent audit of the state’s Department of Motor Vehicles after another 1,500 residents, including non-citizens, were improperly added to the voting rolls. Following the latest disclosure about more people being wrongly added to the voter rolls, Secretary of State Alex Padilla said a press conference that a freeze of the state’s Motor Voter program is “certainly on the table.” “We’re doing the homework as we speak of what does that mean and what it would take,” Padilla said. “These mistakes from the DMV are absolutely unacceptable.”

Iowa: Scott County residents have a new way to find out where they vote. Recently, County Auditor and Commissioner of Elections Roxanna Mortiz announced the new WhereUVote Scott County app. The app helps users find early voting times and locations, Election Day times and locations and a way to contact the auditor’s office. “With so many people of all ages now using mobile devices it just makes sense to provide a mobile friendly alternative to people,” Moritz told WQAD. “Four other counties in Iowa provide this app to their citizens. As soon as I saw it I knew we needed this app for Scott County. It’s perfect for people on the go.”

Texas: Potter County will be the first county in the state to use LanguageLine, a visual translator for more than 200 language. “Between the American Sign Language and Somalian, we realized we had a gap,” Elections Administrator Melynn Huntley told KFDA. “We are not required by law to do this. We just felt like this was something we should do because it’s the right thing to do.” When a voter who doesn’t speak English or Spanish shows up on election day, they will be prompted to select a language from a tablet device. A virtual translator will appear on the screen and the election worker will ask for voting information and instructions to be translated to the voter.

 

Opinions This Week

National Opinions: Ex-felon voting rights | Election security, II, III, IV, V | Voter suppression | Paper ballots | Voting rights | Supreme Court

Arizona: Voting machines

Arkansas: Secretary of state race

California: Young voters | Ventura County | Election volunteers;

Colorado: Secretary of state race

District of Columbia: Early voting

Florida: Vote-by-mail | Ex-felon voting rights

Georgia: Election oversight

Guam: Voting rights

Indiana: Voter purges

Kansas: Voter suppression

Louisiana: Secretary of state race, II

Maryland: Early voting

Michigan: Election security, II | Secretary of state race | Voter participation

Mississippi: Election security

Missouri: Voter ID, II | Early voting

Montana: Ballot collection

New York: Voting system, II

North Dakota: Voter ID

Ohio: Early voting| Voting rights

Oklahoma: Election security, II

Oregon: Prepaid postage

Pennsylvania: Election security

South Carolina: Election reform

Tennessee: Turnout

Texas: Election security | Straight-ticket voting

U.S. Virgin Islands: Early voting

Utah: Election security, II | Ranked choice voting

Virginia: Ex-felon voting rights

West Virginia: County clerks

Wisconsin: Student voter registration

Wyoming: Crossover voting

 

Clearie Awards Deadline Extended!

EAC extends deadline for third annual competition for best practices in election administration

The U.S. Election Assistance Commission (EAC) has extended the deadline for submissions for its third annual “Clearie” awards, a national competition for best practices in election administration, until Friday, November 30, 2018. This year, the Commission will present awards in the categories of best practices related to voting accessibility, outstanding innovations in elections, and recruiting, training and retaining election workers. All entries must be received no later than Friday, November 30, 2018.

This year, the Clearie awards are dedicated the life and legacy of Wendy Noren and R. Brian Lewis. Wendy Noren served as Boone County Clerk for over three decades and was a member of the EAC’s Board of Advisors before passing away in July 2018 following a long battle with cancer. R. Brian Lewis served as Counsel to the office of the Senate Majority Leader before his passing and was an early and steadfast proponent of the Help America Vote Act (HAVA) and election officials. Both were luminaries in the field of election administration who will long be remembered for their work and friendship.

“Election officials are known for their commitment to the values expressed in the EAC Clearie awards: excellence, innovation, maintaining accuracy and integrity in the election process and ensuring all eligible citizens can cast a ballot,” said EAC Chairman Thomas Hicks. “The Clearies are a testament to their work and dedication and highlight best practices other election administrators can emulate.”

This year’s entries will be judged using the following criteria:

  • Efficacy
  • Innovation
  • Sustainability
  • Outreach efforts
  • Cost-effectiveness
  • Replicability

All submissions should be sent to the EAC via an email to clearinghouse@eac.gov. Nominators should use the following subject lines based on entry category: Election Worker Competition, Accessibility Competition or Outstanding Innovations Competition.

All entries must include a brief summary of the election program nominated and attach relevant documents, images and links that can be used to assess the entry. Submissions should also include contact information for the person submitting the program for consideration. Each entry must be submitted in a separate email.

For more information about this year’s competition, please contact Patrick Leahy at pleahy@eac.gov.

 

Upcoming Events

Council of State Governments Annual Conference — The Council of State Government will hold its 2018 National Conference in the Northern Kentucky, Greater Cincinnati area in December. Keynote speakers are J.D. Vance, author of Hillbilly Elegy and Story Musgrave who started life in the Marines and finished is public service at NASA where he spent more than 1,200 hours in space. The conference will include a 2.5 hour session on election cybersecurity communications mapping. Where: Cincinnati, Ohio. When: December 6-8.

Election Audit Summit—The Election Audit Summit will provide a space for participants from across the scientific, policy and legal worlds to discuss new developments in the field of post-election auditing, and engage in the ongoing conversation on the current status and future directions of the election audits in the United States. Where: Cambridge, Massachusetts. When: December 7-8.

International Association of Government Officials — IGO’s 2019 mid-winter conference will be held in Irvine, California, January 6-11, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of State Election Directors — The NASED Winter Conference will be held in Washington DC, February 1-4, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of Secretaries of State — The NASS Winter Conference will be held in Washington, DC, February 1-4, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

International Association of Government Officials — IGO’s 2019 Annual Conference will be held in Houston, Texas, July 11-17. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of Counties — NACo’s 2019 Annual Conference will be held in Clark County (Las Vegas), Nevada July 11-15, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of State Election Directors — The NASED Summer Conference will be held in Austin, Texas, July 14-16, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

 

Job Postings This Week

electionlineWeekly publishes election administration job postings each week as a free service to our readers. To have your job listed in the newsletter, please send a copy of the job description, including a web link to mmoretti@electionline.org.  Job postings must be received by 5pm on Wednesday in order to appear in the Thursday newsletter. Listings will run for three weeks or till the deadline listed in the posting.

Assistant Inspector General for Audit, U.S. Election Assistance Commission —The Assistant Inspector General for Audit (AIGA) directs or conducts performance audits, evaluations, inspections and reviews of EAC programs, functions, and operations. The incumbent maintains personal contact with key senior officials within and outside of EAC, such as management and officials of CIGIE, OMB, GAO, other Federal and state agencies, contractors and educational or research groups. Participates with the IG in developing the annual audit plan; determining the scope of each audit; developing and adjusting audit guides when necessary to meet special or unusual circumstances; and participating in entrance and exit conferences with auditees (city, county, state, and/or EAC officials). The AIGA supervises the work of subordinates, if any, and monitors the work of contractors. Salary: $119,5897-$141328. Deadline: November 30.  Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Certification Manager (Denver, CO) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Certification Manager to join our team in Denver, CO! This position is a cross -functional leader playing a key role in managing certification efforts for Dominion Voting products. In this role, you will act as a representative of the company with State and Federal certification officials, test labs, and other key internal and external stakeholders throughout the certification process. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Certification Project Manager, Hart InterCivic — The Certification Project Manager manages state and federal certification projects of our Hardware and Software products, under the direction of the Certification Program Manager. The Certification Project Manager must be able to exercise sound judgment and interact with regulatory authorities in a professional manner, particularly in high-pressure situations. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Customer Relations Manager (Phoenix, AZ) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Customer Relations Manager to join our team in Phoenix, AZ! This position will be responsible for effectively and proactively managing the day-to-day relationship, administration and technical/product support of one or more assigned customer accounts. Additionally, the CRM will serve as project manager for specialized projects such as pre- and postelection day support, new product implementations, and/or product upgrades/updates. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Director of Government Affairs, Hart InterCivic — The Hart InterCivic Director of Government Affairs oversees all aspects of support services for Hart’s government relations activities for state and federal government entities. These include: identifying and engaging critical stakeholders at the federal, state, and county level, researching and providing consistent and proactive communication of company’s regulatory strategy, partnering with key internal cross-functional departments, participating in industry forums ensuring active engagement where most critical, and developing monitoring/measurement tools to provide visibility and transparency. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Program Manager, CIS— the Elections Program Manager is assigned to the Elections Infrastructure ISAC (EI-ISAC) at the Center for Internet Security. Reporting to the Director of the EI-ISAC, the Elections Program Manager will partner with other cybersecurity team members to promote the CIS mission and help support our growth. The primary purpose of this position is to serve as a subject matter expert on and represent the EI-ISAC in public forums regarding election infrastructure issues. The Elections Program Manager will work with the EI-ISAC Director to build relationships in the elections community and identify tools, products, and initiatives that meet the security needs of election officials. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Field Sales Director, Hart InterCivic — the Field Sales Director works primarily on the road and from a home office when he/she is not on business travel. The Field Sales Director is responsible for creating news sales with prospects and existing clients in a defined region. Today, this role is a single contributor and does not directly manage people.  This position will report to the VP of Sales. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Full Stack Architect / Senior Software Engineer, Clear Ballot— Clear Ballot is looking for an accomplished, Boston MA based Architect/Senior Software Engineer who wants to bring their technical and leadership skills to bear on a hugely consequential problem: Bringing transparency to democratic elections. The successful candidate will implement new products and features under tight deadlines. You will be using primarily Python and MySQL that interface with front-end web applications implemented in JavaScript and HTML5. The ideal candidate should have strong technical and leadership skills and a good working knowledge of the latest concepts in security, performance, and resilience. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build and enhance a platform that is changing the elections industry. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Full Stack Software Developer, Clear Ballot — The successful candidate will build and enhance enterprise-level, highly available applications using primarily Python and MySQL that interface with frontend web applications implemented in JavaScript and HTML5. The ideal candidate should have strong technical skills and a good working knowledge of the latest concepts in performance, security and resilience. One of the hallmarks of our system is its emphasis on new visualization techniques made possible by sophisticated data structures that enable high-performance in a multi-user environment. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build and enhance a platform that is changing the elections industry. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Inside Sales Representative, Runbeck — to support our desired growth and market expansion, we continue to hire outstanding talent in multiple departments. We are looking for highly motivated, dedicated and talented individuals who will be able to contribute significantly to the success of the company while receiving great opportunities for professional growth and financial benefits. Responsibilities include: Contact potential or existing customers to inform them about a product or service; ability to present solution and its value to a prospect over the phone; answer questions about products or the company; ask questions to understand customer requirements and close sales; enter and update customer information in the database; keep records of calls and sale and note useful information in the CRM; process orders in an accurate manner; and go the “extra mile” to meet sales quota and facilitate future sales. Application: In order to apply, please send a resume to Tammy White: twhite@runbeck.net.

Program Manager, Overseas Voting Initiative, Council of State Governments — the Program Manager of CSG’s Overseas Voting Initiative, funded through a cooperative agreement with the US Dept. of Defense (DOD) Federal Voting Assistance Program (FVAP), provides day-to-day management and oversight of the Initiative, including research and policy analysis of electronic absentee voting systems for military voters, and development and dissemination of educational policy programming and deliverables to state leaders in support of the cooperative agreement. The Program Manager works within CSG’s Center of Innovation and in cooperation with CSG’s policy and executive management teams as well as regional offices, affiliates and members to support, monitor and improve state elections processes for military and overseas voters. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Project Manager (Austin, TX) – Hart InterCivic — Hart InterCivic is looking for a project manager to work with our Professional Services Team.  The project manager oversees the deployment of voting systems and training to both existing and new Hart customers. The ideal candidate has experience in the elections industry, is PMP certified, and is motivated to achieve success for our customers with initiative.  Travel up to 80 percent. Reports to the Manager of Professional Services. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Sales Engineer, Clear Ballot — Our Sales and Marketing team is looking for a seasoned, hardworking and energetic Sales Engineer with proven experience and a passion for selling technology solutions. This role is responsible for being the primary technical resource for our sales force while also actively driving and managing the technology evaluation stage of the sales process. You will be required to have an in-depth technical knowledge of Clear Ballot’s Clear Vote suite and demonstrating the product capabilities to prospective customers. The ideal candidate must also be able to identify and provide reliable solutions for all technical issues to assure complete customer satisfaction. Measures of success include new customer acquisition rates, renewal rates, upselling, cross-selling, customer satisfaction and contribution to overall sales team and new customer success Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Senior Level Software Developer, BPro — We are a well-established small business that has been developing requirements and producing software for the needs of state governments since 1985 and continue to maintain and upgrade many of those systems. We have offices in Pierre, South Dakota, Fargo, North Dakota, Minnesota & Virginia. We’re currently looking for an energetic and intelligent .Net Developer to join our growing team. Our ideal candidate is one who loves to learn, enjoys working as a team, and who can multitask and meet deadlines. Skills required: .NET, VB, VBA, ASP, SQL, HTML, and JavaScript. A four-year college degree is the minimum educational requirement. All applicants must have excellent written and verbal communications skills. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Senior Researcher, Public Policy Evaluation Research, Fors Marsh Group — FMG is hiring for a researcher on the Public Policy Evaluation team which serves to address public concerns and promote the quality of the community. This is done through a) articulating the public’s needs, b) conducting rigorous evaluation to assess how these needs are being met, and c) working with our clients to improve these programs and policies. This job is best suited for an individual who enjoys research, has experience leading research team, possesses excellent attention to detail, continuously strives to learn and develop, and prefers working in a cooperative environment. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Senior Software Developer, Runbeck— Runbeck Election Services is looking for full stack enthusiasts who are comfortable tackling end-to-end and enjoy building products that solve big problems and delight customers. We’re a collaborative team who knows how to get things done (Lone Rangers need not apply). We believe that small teams focused on shipping software move the fastest and make the most impact. The ideal candidate for this position has extensive back end skills (C#, MVC, ASP.Net, SQL Server) paired with solid web and desktop skills (IIS, JavaScript, HTML 5, CSS, jQuery, WPF, Win Forms). Must have a solid grasp of our basic toolset (Jira, Visual Studio). Willing to learn new plug-ins and IDE enhancements in order to boost your productivity and are excited to introduce us to new tooling experiences that have worked for you in the past. You bring discipline and care about implementation practices. You are familiar with Agile/Scrum processes, practice common design patterns, embrace clean coding principles, and employ many other techniques in an effort to bring a high level of software craftsmanship to your finished product. Application: In order to apply, please send a resume to Tammy White: twhite@runbeck.net.

Software Product Specialist II (Phoenix, AZ) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Software Product Specialist II to join our team in Phoenix, AZ! This position will be responsible for delivering a wide variety of technical and non-technical customer support services related to the implementation, operation, repair, maintenance and upgrades of Dominion Voting Systems technology products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Systems Engineer, Clear Ballot — We are looking for a talented Systems Engineer who has both a technical and services/support background which enables them to quickly assess customer needs and offer value to Clear Ballot’s customers. The Systems Engineer will gain a deep understanding of how Clear Ballot’s products operate and their optimal configuration to build a streamlined installation process of the Clear Vote election system. The ideal candidate for this position can prioritize mission critical tasks and coordinate the implementation and expansion of our systems. They will be able to work directly with customers, display innovation, think conceptually and act tactically to build consensus around system installation and enhancement and meet deadlines. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

 

Marketplace

electionline provides no guarantees as to the quality of the items being sold and the accuracy of the information provided about the sale items in the Marketplace. Ads are provided directly by sellers and are not verified by electionline. If you have an ad for Marketplace, please email it to: mmoretti@electionline.org

Voting Booths
Each aluminum briefcase contains the following: aluminum legs, privacy shield, writing base, light assembly. All units are in great shape dimensions are 22”x 18”x 3“. MFG: ESL. Election supplies Limited, Napa California. Quantity: 400 Price per unit is $50. Contact Greg Larson 408.569.1004

 

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In Focus This Week

October 4, 2018

October 4, 2018

In Focus This Week

The long and the short of it
Jurisdictions dealing with particularly long ballots this election

By M. Mindy Moretti
electionline

The ballot in Seminole County, Florida is 56 inches long. If it was a human it would be tall enough to ride all the rides at Disney World, even Space Mountain!

In Pasco County, Florida, the double-sided 17-inch ballot could only ride a handful of amusement park rides, but at 34-inches long, it’s still a long one.

Longer ballots may lead to Election Day lines and in some jurisdictions could lead to a slower process on election night. Especially long ballots in the 2018 election cycle are forcing elections officials and voters alike to rethink how they cast and process their ballots.

“The longer ballot won’t directly delay results,” explained Michael Ertel, supervisor of elections for Seminole County. “But longer ballots do mean longer lines of voters.  At 7 p.m., those longer lines could mean the precinct will close later, thus the results would only be reported after the polling place closes.”

Brian Corley, supervisor of elections in Pasco County has also been stressing the importance of sample ballots.

“We have been and will continue to preach the importance of voters being #ElectionReady and each voter is sent a sample ballot in which they can do the research on the candidates and issues and show up to vote and by simply transposing their selections from their sample ballot to the actual ballot, it will greatly speed up the process for them and the other voters behind them.”

Ertel said the two-page ballot has also caused a significant change to the county’s spoiled ballot procedure for poll workers.

And elections officials in Florida are not alone. From coast to coast voters and election administrators will be faced with long ballots this year.

In St. Louis County, Missouri, voters will be faced with a 19-inch, front and back ballot, which may be the longest ballot in the county’s history. In addition to numerous candidates, there will also be 15 countywide questions/propositions for voters to wade through.

Eric Fey, the Democratic Director of Elections for St. Louis County said the elections office’s paramount concern was keeping the ballot on one page since voters and poll workers have never experienced a two card ballot. As a result they altered the font size on the ballot in addition to eliminating some headings. This is not optimal, but Fey said they thought having two pieces of paper was even worse.

“It is not costing us anything extra to print these ballots, but it is wreaking havoc with our ability to print in house and fold the ballots,” Fey said. “Our in house ballot on demand printers have a very difficult time duplexing (printing front and back) the 19” ballot. As a result, we have ordered more absentee ballots from our printer.”

Fey said the folding of the absentee ballots will make running these through the scanner problematic and it may very well take extra time to scan these ballots. That being said, Fey does not anticipate it taking any longer to process the ballots on election.

“What we are more worried about is the amount of time it will take people to vote. Missouri is an excuse only absentee state which means 90 percent of voters vote at their polling place on Election Day. We deploy DRE’s and paper ballots to every polling place. We don’t have any additional DRE’s to send out, so we anticipate a higher than normal amount voters switching over to paper ballots when the lines for the DRE’s get long,” Fey said. “We are sending additional paper ballots and voting booths to hopefully accommodate the influx. We have been timing some our absentee voters so far and it has been taking an average of about 9 minutes to complete the ballot.”

Voters in Denver will face their longest ballot since the state moved to a vote center/vote-by-mail format. In addition to candidates, the three-card ballot also includes multiple local initiatives. Denver Elections will spend about an additional $114,200 to print the ballot.

Although the city is vote-by-mail/vote center, Denver Elections has been very proactive about encouraging voters to complete their ballots at home and drop them off, early. State law allows Denver Elections to begin processing ballots before Election Day.

“As usual, we are advising voters to not wait until the last minute to vote. We have 28 24-Hour Ballot Drop-off Boxes available starting October 15 and most of our Vote Centers offer drive-through ballot drop-off, so there is no reason to wait until Election Day,” explained Alton Dillard, spokesman for Denver Elections. “If you’ll pardon the pun, you reach a point of diminishing returns when you grind through into Wednesday morning with the vote count so we are planning to wrap the count at Midnight and get our team rested so they can resume the count Wednesday morning.”

Dillard said in his meetings with local news room management he’s warning them about the three card ballot. The ballot itself contains language asking the voters to vote all cards and all sides as do the ballot instructions, which is a switch from the primary where unaffiliated voters were instructed to only return one ballot card. Dillard said Denver Elections will also continue to do strong social media campaigns once the ballots drop in a week or so.

In Yellowstone County, Montana, Elections Administrator Bret Rutherford has gone on the offensive with expectations about results. The county has a two-page ballot with the front page being candidate races and the back being initiatives. Rutherford announced recently that the results from page one of the ballot will be available on election night and the results from page two will come the next day.

“The majority of the public interest will be for the races,” Rutherford said. “The second sheet has two initiatives.”

It will cost the county about $25,000 extra to print the ballot and despite the added time to count the ballots, Rutherford doesn’t anticipate it will take any longer for voters to vote on Election Day.

“Two pages will not affect the lines on election day,” Rutherford said. “We have plenty of overflow areas to use if people are in the booths for extended time.”

Additionally, a majority of the county’s voters typically cast their ballot by mail.

Planning for the future
While ballots are now complete for the 2018 election, as more and more jurisdictions move to consolidate elections and voters are facing numerous initiatives, it’s never too soon to start thinking about the next long ballot.

Dana Chisnell and Whitney Quesenbery with the Center for Civic Design have some great advice for elections officials.

“The most important message is to keep each contest on same page in a single column,” Quesenbery said. “Splitting a contest is the single biggest way to cause errors, because voters will often mark a candidate in each part of the contest.”

Citing the 2018 California primary with more than 28 candidates running for governor, Quesenbery said there were a few things that helped but did not completely solve the over-voting problem:

  • Strong headers extending across the 2 columns
  • Darker lines around the contests to emphasize the boundary
  • Stronger message in the header emphasizing the number of candidates.
  • Nothing else in the columns with the large contests

Make the header for the large contests take up extra vertical space, so they call attention to themselves, and set the contest off from the one next to it.

With many counties being forced to move to two cards to accommodate all the candidates and ballot questions, Chisnell and Quesenbery said it’s important how elections officials talk about the ballot itself. Reinforce the number of pages and not the number of cards for example.

“Because the ballots are double-sided, the second most important thing is to put a navigation prompt at the bottom of the right hand column if at all possible. The typical banner across the bottom doesn’t work. It’s basically invisible,” Chisnell said. “In a study we (and friends) did in 2008 in Sarasota County, even the poll workers were unlikely to vote the second side without the prompt at the bottom of the column (versus then bottom of the card).”

There is more great advice in the Center for Civic Design’s Field Guide: Designing usable ballots.

Two things everyone interviewed agreed about are open lines of communications with voters about what to expect at the polls and afterwards and if at all possible, vote-by-mail.

“Oh! AND — They should encourage people to vote by mail if at all possible because longer ballots will probably cause longer lines at the polling place,” Chisnell said in parting.

 

Federal-State Updates

According to Martin Matishak with Politico, the timeline for approving the Secure Elections Act is quickly slipping to 2019. The House is on recess until after the election the Senate is focused on judicial nominations. Also, Sen. James Lankford isn’t sure the revamped legislation would be ready for the post-election lame duck session.

At this point it’s getting the text done. And when we get the text done, get it moved,” Lankford told Politico last week. “I know that doesn’t sound like a deadline … If we can get it in the lame-duck, great. If we have to wait until early in the next session, great.”

In happier news, speaking at a cybersecurity event hosted by The Washington Post, Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen highlighted many of the improvements in information sharing across the federal government and with state and local officials.

“First of all, the information sharing is much stronger than it even has been before,” Nielsen said when asked what had changed in the department’s approach since 2016 according to FCW. “So [we’re] working very closely with the intel community, and the moment that we see something significant we are — in conjunction with the IC — sharing with our state and local partners. The sharing is quicker, faster, more tailored.”

Also at the summit, Nielsen said DHS hasn’t seen any signs that China is seeking to interfere in the midterm elections by targeting election infrastructure.

This week, the Senate has approved the authorization of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) which would create an independent agency within the Department of Homeland Security—similar to FEMA. The legislation now must be taken up by the House.

 

Election News This Week

It happens every year, including this year. Voters get unsolicited voter registration forms in the mail, sometimes addressed to deceased family members or even pets. But in 2018 scam artists have taken it a whole different level, by calling voters instead of contacting them via mail. Officials in several states including Idaho, Illinois, Mississippi, and Washington have reported that voters are receiving calls from someone claiming to work with TurboVote and seeking personal information to register the resident and/or to send them an absentee ballot. Elections officials in the states where residents have received the calls are encouraging them to reach out to their offices or the local authorities. The National Association of Secretaries of State and The National Association of State Election Directors have reached out to their members to warn them about the scam and many statewide officials including those in Louisiana, Maine,  and Oklahoma have reached out to state and local media to alert the public. On Thursday, TurboVote put out a statement, which in part says, “While we are still gathering the facts, it appears that a scam is being perpetrated in our name. We recognize the seriousness of this issue and wanted to assure you that we are cooperating with state and local election officials, along with federal law enforcement, to provide whatever assistance possible as they pursue relevant leads.”

Although the plaintiffs are seeking a ruling from the U.S. Supreme Court, North Dakota is moving ahead with plans to implement its voter ID law in the November election. The law requires residents to provide a street address although some residents living on Reservations don’t have traditional street addresses and rely on post office boxes. The secretary of state’s office has notified the state’s five tribes about the law and how residents can obtain a no-cost residential street address. Tribal members need to contact the local 911 coordinator for a street address. Rolette County Emergency Coordinator Mike Stewart told The Tribune that residential street addresses have been assigned in 99 percent of the county including on the Turtle Mountain Reservation. Stewart said many people don’t necessarily realize they’ve been assigned a street address, which is where the secretary of state’s campaign comes in.

Indiana Secretary of State Connie Lawson is encouraging county elections offices to accept faulty absentee ballot applications that were sent out by the state Democratic Party. According to Indiana Public Media, state law requires applications for absentee ballots to include instructions about how to submit them. But applications distributed by the Indiana Democratic Party didn’t. And some counties denied some of those applications when voters submitted them. “If you got a mailing from the Indiana Democratic Party and in that mailing was an application for an absentee ballot, that you need to double check that your application is good and you will be receiving a ballot,” Lawson said. Lawson said she wants to ensure voters aren’t disenfranchised by the mistake.

Although New York City is the most populous city in the country, only about 55 percent of New Yorkers went to the polls for the 2016 general election and Mayor Bill de Blasio has a plan, or in this case, a person, to fight voter apathy. This week de Blasio created the position of chief democracy officer, a $165,000-per-year position. But don’t look for a position description in the Job Postings, the slot has already been filled by Ayirini ­Fonseca-Sabune, a civil-rights lawyer. According to the New York Post, she’ll be developing voter registration drives, expanding civics lesson plans for teachers . . . and engaging local and national partners to engage people civically at all levels of government.

That’s a lot of potential “I Voted” stickers to hand out! A record 800,000 people registered to vote on National Voter Registration Day last week. Nonprofit VOTE, which coordinates NVRD had hoped to register 300,000 people. “Some us were saying, ‘Hey, maybe we’ll hit 400 or 500,000,” says Brian Miller, executive director of Nonprofit VOTE. “No one that I know of thought we would surpass 800,000 voter registrations. That surprised all of us. But I think it’s a sign of the interest in the midterms and the interest in having this unified day of action.” By comparison, the holiday drew in 771,321 voter registrations in 2016. In 2014 — the only other midterm election for which the holiday has existed — 154,500 people registered to vote. The holiday was first observed in 2012.

Personnel News: Former Missouri Secretary of State Jason Kander announced that he has dropped his mayoral bid in Kansas City in order to focus on recovering from post-traumatic stress depression. Kander, who also founded Let America Vote said in his announcement he had been ignoring symptoms of PTSD and depression for more than a decade. We wish Jason well and look forward to seeing him again very soon. Benjamin Hovland has been nominated by President Donald J. Trump to serve as a commissioner on the U.S. Election Assistance Commission. Hovland is currently the acting chief counsel with the U.S. Senate Committee on Rules and Administration.

 

Research & Report Summaries

Research and Report Summaries are provided by Sean Greene. Greene has served as the director of research for the U.S. Election Assistance Commission and the Pew Center on the States Election Initiatives. He currently lives in Rome where he is studying Italian, drinking Moretti beer and still paying close attention to the administration of elections in the United States. He’s looking forward to casting his first ballot as a UOCAVA voter.

Cost of Voting in the American States – Quan Li, Michael J. PomanteII, and Scot Schraufnage, Election Law Journal: Rules, Politics, and Policy, Vol. 17, No. 3, September 18, 2018: Examining state election laws, the authors create a cost of voting index for the past six presidential elections, ranking each state on a scale of how easy or difficult it is for a voter to cast a ballot. This includes 33 variables related to voter registration or voting including registration deadlines, the existence or lack thereof of early voting, and what identification is required at the polls.

 

Legislative Updates

Federal Legislation: The House has passed a non-binding resolution opposing allowing non-U.S. citizens to participate in local elections. Forty-nine Democrats joined 230 Republicans to approve the resolution 279-72. Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., proposed the resolution after hearing from naturalized citizens who said they felt “disenfranchised” by non-citizens taking party in school board elections. “This dilutes why people work so hard to become citizens. It dilutes an election as well,” McCarthy told NBC News. “I think only American citizens can vote.”

A group of senators has introduced the Native American Voting Rights of 2018, legislation that will provide then necessary resources and oversight to ensure Native American have equal access to the electoral process.  The legislation would implement key provisions to ensure Native Americans have equal access to the ballot box, including the establishment of a first of its kind Native American Voting Rights Task Force, which would authorize funding for tribal-state consortiums to bolster Native voter registration, education and election participation efforts in tribal communities. The bill would also increase Native access to voter registration sites and polling locations and ensure equal treatment for tribal ID cards for voting purposes. Finally, the bill addresses the devastating effects of Shelby County by prohibiting states from undertaking discriminatory actions without Department of Justice agreement while emphasizing the importance of government-to-government consultation.

Michigan: The House has approved a three-bill package that they hope will deter election fraud by clearly defining election forgery as a crime. Under the legislation, any person who knowingly makes, files or publishes a false document or document with false signatures with the the intent to defraud is guilty of forgery. House Bills 5992 (105-2), 6107 (91-13) and 6108 (93-14) now move to the Senate for consideration.

Also this week, the House has unanimously approved a package of bills that will allow Michigan to offer online voter registration. The Senate must now concur with technical changes to the bill, but it appears likely that online voter registration will be in effect by 2020.

New York: State Assemblyman Anthony D’Urso has introduced ab ill that would allow locations that have been designated a polling place to decline to have voting there if they have a valid reason.

North Carolina: This week, the Legislature agreed to provide the State Board of Elections with $400,000 to help with voter education about absentee voting in the wake of Hurricane Florence, but the Legislature did not change any existing absentee voting laws as some had sought. The Legislature also agreed to extend the voter registration deadline by three days.

Ohio: Next week, the Toledo City Council will consider a proposal that would give city employees paid time off to work at the polls on Election Day. The Precinct Election Official Leave Program would not cover training, which would have to be done on the weekends or the employee’s own leave time.

 

Legal Updates

Arizona: The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals heard arguments this week over Arizona’s ballot-harvesting law. The case hinges on several aspects of federal postal law, which allows some private carriers to deliver mail when they are engaged in official duties and using a postal route. The state argued that volunteer poll worker deliveries don’t meet those criteria, but attorneys for the plaintiffs say they do.

Colorado: The secretary of state’s office has asked the U.S. Attorney’s Office to investigate allegations of voter intimidation in Pitkin. Residents are not required to live in the town for any period of time in order to be eligible to vote and many who leave town for the winter months have reported that their utility records have been subpoenaed and their cars photographed.

Georgia: The Coalition for Good Governance along with four voters have filed a motion asking U.S. District Judge Amy Totenberg to issue an injunction directing the secretary of state’s office, the state board of elections and the Fulton County board of elections to put in place a plan that would provide more checks on the county’s voting system.

Kentucky: Attorney General Andy Beshear has appointed an independent counsel to examine allegations that Secretary of State Allison Lundergran Grimes misused voter data and potentially violated the commonwealth’s personnel laws.

Missouri: Oral arguments wrapped up this week in the legal fight against Missouri’s voter ID law. Senior Judge Richard Callahan is expected to rule next week.

North Dakota: The Native American Rights Fund, which is representing Native American voters in North Dakota, has filed an emergency appeal with the Supreme Court of the United States after a federal appeals court halted part of a lower court’s ruling that said the state must accept IDs and supplemental documentation with a current mailing address as a form of voter ID.

South Carolina: Attorney General Alan Wilson has sued the State Election Commission in an effort to extend the voter registration deadline by more than a week citing flooding from Hurricane Florence. Currently, the deadline to register is October 5 in-person, October 7 online and October 9 by mail. Wilson wants to extend the registration deadline to October 17 for in-person and mail registration. According to The Post and Courier, the Election Commission says it does not have the authority to extend the registration deadline and supports the lawsuit. On Tuesday, Judge Robert Hood granted a 10-day extension.

Tennessee: The U.S. Supreme Court will not take up the challenge to Amendment 1 in Tennessee. In 2014, 53 percent of the voters approved Amendment 1 which would have eliminated a right to an abortion under the state constitution. Plaintiffs had sued focusing their efforts on language in the state’s constitution about how ballot measures are counted.

U.S. Territories: The U.S. Supreme Court is expected to meet on October 5 to determine whether or not to grant review of Segovia v. United States. The case centers around voting rights for people living on U.S. Territories. The plaintiffs assert that people who have moved from one of the 50 states or District of Columbia to one of the U.S. territories, should continue to be allowed to vote absentee in the state from which they moved.

 

Tech Thursday

Tech Companies: Cleveland-based Votem, a mobile voting company, has acquired Everyone Counts. Votem offers mobile-voting products based on blockchain technology. Votem and Everyone Counts are currently working in eight jurisdictions and CEO Pete Martin told the Cleveland Plain Dealer that next steps include merging and revamping some products and adding blockchain security to all of the company’s offerings.

Pennsylvania: The Keystone State has joined a growing list of states that are blocking overseas IPs from accessing their elections website, which in turn prevents overseas voters from registering or updating their registration information and from applying for an absentee ballot. Department of State spokesperson Wanda Murren said Tuesday that officials have begun notifying voters about the issue and giving them a work-around

 

Opinions This Week

National Opinions: Voting rights; Voting machines; Election security, II, III | Federalized voting system | Voter rolls | Ex-felon voting rights

Alaska: Anchorage elections

Arkansas: Secretary of state race

California: Secretary of state race | Voter ID

Colorado: Secretary of state race

Florida: Voting rights | Escambia County | Ex-felon voting rights, II, III

Illinois: Ballot selfies, II, III

Indiana: Paper trail | Local elections | Vote centers

Kansas: Election confidence

Maryland: Voting rights

Michigan: Election integrity

Minnesota: Voting system

Missouri: Voter registration

New Hampshire: Secretary of state, II

North Carolina: Florence impacts, II | Voter ID, II | Voting Rights Act

Oregon: Pre-paid postage

Pennsylvania: Turnout | Unaffiliated voters

South Carolina: Automatic voter registration

Texas: Voting rights

Vermont: Voting system

West Virginia: Voter ID

Wisconsin: Vote-by-mail | Voting system

 

Upcoming Events

Council of State Governments Annual Conference — The Council of State Government will hold its 2018 National Conference in the Northern Kentucky, Greater Cincinnati area in December. Keynote speakers are J.D. Vance, author of Hillbilly Elegy and Story Musgrave who started life in the Marines and finished is public service at NASA where he spent more than 1,200 hours in space. The conference will include a 2.5 hour session on election cybersecurity communications mapping. Where: Cincinnati, Ohio. When: December 6-8.

Election Audit Summit—The Election Audit Summit will provide a space for participants from across the scientific, policy and legal worlds to discuss new developments in the field of post-election auditing, and engage in the ongoing conversation on the current status and future directions of the election audits in the United States. Where: Cambridge, Massachusetts. When: December 7-8.

International Association of Government Officials — IGO’s 2019 mid-winter conference will be held in Irvine, California, January 6-11, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of State Election Directors — The NASED Winter Conference will be held in Washington DC, February 1-4, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of Secretaries of State — The NASS Winter Conference will be held in Washington, DC, February 1-4, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

International Association of Government Officials — IGO’s 2019 Annual Conference will be held in Houston, Texas, July 11-17. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of Counties — NACo’s 2019 Annual Conference will be held in Clark County (Las Vegas), Nevada July 11-15, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of State Election Directors — The NASED Summer Conference will be held in Austin, Texas, July 14-16, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

 

Job Postings This Week

electionlineWeekly publishes election administration job postings each week as a free service to our readers. To have your job listed in the newsletter, please send a copy of the job description, including a web link to mmoretti@electionline.org.  Job postings must be received by 5pm on Wednesday in order to appear in the Thursday newsletter. Listings will run for three weeks or till the deadline listed in the posting.

Certification Manager (Denver, CO) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Certification Manager to join our team in Denver, CO! This position is a cross -functional leader playing a key role in managing certification efforts for Dominion Voting products. In this role, you will act as a representative of the company with State and Federal certification officials, test labs, and other key internal and external stakeholders throughout the certification process. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Certification Project Manager, Hart InterCivic — The Certification Project Manager manages state and federal certification projects of our Hardware and Software products, under the direction of the Certification Program Manager. The Certification Project Manager must be able to exercise sound judgment and interact with regulatory authorities in a professional manner, particularly in high-pressure situations. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Customer Relations Manager (Phoenix, AZ) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Customer Relations Manager to join our team in Phoenix, AZ! This position will be responsible for effectively and proactively managing the day-to-day relationship, administration and technical/product support of one or more assigned customer accounts. Additionally, the CRM will serve as project manager for specialized projects such as pre- and postelection day support, new product implementations, and/or product upgrades/updates. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Director of Government Affairs, Hart InterCivic — The Hart InterCivic Director of Government Affairs oversees all aspects of support services for Hart’s government relations activities for state and federal government entities. These include: identifying and engaging critical stakeholders at the federal, state, and county level, researching and providing consistent and proactive communication of company’s regulatory strategy, partnering with key internal cross-functional departments, participating in industry forums ensuring active engagement where most critical, and developing monitoring/measurement tools to provide visibility and transparency. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Program Manager, CIS— the Elections Program Manager is assigned to the Elections Infrastructure ISAC (EI-ISAC) at the Center for Internet Security. Reporting to the Director of the EI-ISAC, the Elections Program Manager will partner with other cybersecurity team members to promote the CIS mission and help support our growth. The primary purpose of this position is to serve as a subject matter expert on and represent the EI-ISAC in public forums regarding election infrastructure issues. The Elections Program Manager will work with the EI-ISAC Director to build relationships in the elections community and identify tools, products, and initiatives that meet the security needs of election officials. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Supervisor, Pinal County, Arizona— performs professional and administrative work in planning, organizing and directing strategic and daily goals and objectives, operations and activities of the Elections Department. Work is performed under the general administrative direction of the Elections Director. The employee is expected to exercise initiative, independent judgment and discretion. Salary: $49,647-$56,473. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Field Sales Director, Hart InterCivic — the Field Sales Director works primarily on the road and from a home office when he/she is not on business travel. The Field Sales Director is responsible for creating news sales with prospects and existing clients in a defined region. Today, this role is a single contributor and does not directly manage people.   This position will report to the VP of Sales. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Full Stack Architect / Senior Software Engineer, Clear Ballot— Clear Ballot is looking for an accomplished, Boston MA based Architect/Senior Software Engineer who wants to bring their technical and leadership skills to bear on a hugely consequential problem: Bringing transparency to democratic elections. The successful candidate will implement new products and features under tight deadlines. You will be using primarily Python and MySQL that interface with front-end web applications implemented in JavaScript and HTML5. The ideal candidate should have strong technical and leadership skills and a good working knowledge of the latest concepts in security, performance, and resilience. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build and enhance a platform that is changing the elections industry. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Full Stack Software Developer, Clear Ballot — The successful candidate will build and enhance enterprise-level, highly available applications using primarily Python and MySQL that interface with frontend web applications implemented in JavaScript and HTML5. The ideal candidate should have strong technical skills and a good working knowledge of the latest concepts in performance, security and resilience. One of the hallmarks of our system is its emphasis on new visualization techniques made possible by sophisticated data structures that enable high-performance in a multi-user environment. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build and enhance a platform that is changing the elections industry. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Inside Sales Representative, Runbeck — to support our desired growth and market expansion, we continue to hire outstanding talent in multiple departments. We are looking for highly motivated, dedicated and talented individuals who will be able to contribute significantly to the success of the company while receiving great opportunities for professional growth and financial benefits. Responsibilities include: Contact potential or existing customers to inform them about a product or service; ability to present solution and its value to a prospect over the phone; answer questions about products or the company; ask questions to understand customer requirements and close sales; enter and update customer information in the database; keep records of calls and sale and note useful information in the CRM; process orders in an accurate manner; and go the “extra mile” to meet sales quota and facilitate future sales. Application: In order to apply, please send a resume to Tammy White: twhite@runbeck.net.

Program Manager, Overseas Voting Initiative, Council of State Governments — the Program Manager of CSG’s Overseas Voting Initiative, funded through a cooperative agreement with the US Dept. of Defense (DOD) Federal Voting Assistance Program (FVAP), provides day-to-day management and oversight of the Initiative, including research and policy analysis of electronic absentee voting systems for military voters, and development and dissemination of educational policy programming and deliverables to state leaders in support of the cooperative agreement. The Program Manager works within CSG’s Center of Innovation and in cooperation with CSG’s policy and executive management teams as well as regional offices, affiliates and members to support, monitor and improve state elections processes for military and overseas voters. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Project Manager (Austin, TX) – Hart InterCivic — Hart InterCivic is looking for a project manager to work with our Professional Services Team.  The project manager oversees the deployment of voting systems and training to both existing and new Hart customers. The ideal candidate has experience in the elections industry, is PMP certified, and is motivated to achieve success for our customers with initiative.  Travel up to 80 percent. Reports to the Manager of Professional Services. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Sales Engineer, Clear Ballot — Our Sales and Marketing team is looking for a seasoned, hardworking and energetic Sales Engineer with proven experience and a passion for selling technology solutions. This role is responsible for being the primary technical resource for our sales force while also actively driving and managing the technology evaluation stage of the sales process. You will be required to have an in-depth technical knowledge of Clear Ballot’s Clear Vote suite and demonstrating the product capabilities to prospective customers. The ideal candidate must also be able to identify and provide reliable solutions for all technical issues to assure complete customer satisfaction. Measures of success include new customer acquisition rates, renewal rates, upselling, cross-selling, customer satisfaction and contribution to overall sales team and new customer success Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Senior Level Software Developer, BPro — We are a well-established small business that has been developing requirements and producing software for the needs of state governments since 1985 and continue to maintain and upgrade many of those systems. We have offices in Pierre, South Dakota, Fargo, North Dakota, Minnesota & Virginia. We’re currently looking for an energetic and intelligent .Net Developer to join our growing team. Our ideal candidate is one who loves to learn, enjoys working as a team, and who can multitask and meet deadlines. Skills required: .NET, VB, VBA, ASP, SQL, HTML, and JavaScript. A four-year college degree is the minimum educational requirement. All applicants must have excellent written and verbal communications skills. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Senior Software Developer, Runbeck— Runbeck Election Services is looking for full stack enthusiasts who are comfortable tackling end-to-end and enjoy building products that solve big problems and delight customers. We’re a collaborative team who knows how to get things done (Lone Rangers need not apply). We believe that small teams focused on shipping software move the fastest and make the most impact. The ideal candidate for this position has extensive back end skills (C#, MVC, ASP.Net, SQL Server) paired with solid web and desktop skills (IIS, JavaScript, HTML 5, CSS, jQuery, WPF, Win Forms). Must have a solid grasp of our basic toolset (Jira, Visual Studio). Willing to learn new plug-ins and IDE enhancements in order to boost your productivity and are excited to introduce us to new tooling experiences that have worked for you in the past. You bring discipline and care about implementation practices. You are familiar with Agile/Scrum processes, practice common design patterns, embrace clean coding principles, and employ many other techniques in an effort to bring a high level of software craftsmanship to your finished product. Application: In order to apply, please send a resume to Tammy White: twhite@runbeck.net.

Software Product Specialist II (Phoenix, AZ) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Software Product Specialist II to join our team in Phoenix, AZ! This position will be responsible for delivering a wide variety of technical and non-technical customer support services related to the implementation, operation, repair, maintenance and upgrades of Dominion Voting Systems technology products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Systems Engineer, Clear Ballot — We are looking for a talented Systems Engineer who has both a technical and services/support background which enables them to quickly assess customer needs and offer value to Clear Ballot’s customers. The Systems Engineer will gain a deep understanding of how Clear Ballot’s products operate and their optimal configuration to build a streamlined installation process of the Clear Vote election system. The ideal candidate for this position can prioritize mission critical tasks and coordinate the implementation and expansion of our systems. They will be able to work directly with customers, display innovation, think conceptually and act tactically to build consensus around system installation and enhancement and meet deadlines. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

 

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In Focus This Week

September 27, 2018

September 27, 2018

In Focus This Week

Six steps for the 6th
The right actions and words now and on Nov. 6 will increase public trust

By Jennifer Morell
Democracy Fund

The work of running an election continues to be under a microscope. Misconceptions and misunderstandings about what election officials do or don’t do seem to be consistently in our daily news feed.

Increasing the public’s trust in your elections is as much about the accuracy and validity of the processes you complete as it is about finding meaningful ways to communicate that work.

Below are six examples of common practices that can be enhanced to strengthen confidence in your election.

Open-door testing. Showcasing your public logic and accuracy (L&A) test is a great opportunity to explain how your voting system operates and the tests and checks performed to ensure it functions properly during your election. Look beyond the legal language you’re required post and tell the public why it matters and why they should attend. This is also a great time to invite candidates, party officials, and other stakeholders to observe the process and discuss the tremendous amount of preparation going on behind the scenes. Encourage the media to observe and report on your L&A test by giving them the opportunity to get stock footage of election setup.

Also, consider broadcasting the event on social media. Opening your doors to explain the relevance of this test, as a way to ensure the voting equipment is operating correctly and has not been tampered with, is an important element to increasing trust in your election. Finally, think about how you can use infographics to take voters behind the scenes of some of your other critical functions like how ballots are processed, results are uploaded, or the process for conducting a post-election audit.

Information ambassadors. You’ve trained poll workers to check in voters and issue ballots, but have you given them the tools and training to be your election information ambassadors? Poll workers often become the voice and face of your office on Election Day and should be an integral part of your communication plan. Despite their best efforts to do and say the right thing, it only takes one misinformed (or poorly trained) poll worker to sow doubt on the validity of your process.

Have you provided them with clearly defined talking points for the questions they may be asked or scenarios that might come up? Is there a clear channel of communication for notifying you when things don’t go as expected? What are the expectations and guidelines if they are approached by a journalist or challenged by a voter? All of this should be clearly documented in a clear and simple set of guidelines that everyone has at the ready.

Review communication plans. Communication is a fundamental component of cybersecurity. Most likely you have a plan to communicate a cyber incident with state and federal officials.  Have you mimicked that plan for staff and poll workers in your own office? What is the protocol for someone who sees a suspicious email, misinformation on social media, or suspicious activity with voting equipment? Who is the first line of communication? How will the issue be documented? How will you know if it has been resolved? The Belfer Center’s Election Cyber Incident Communications Coordination Guide is a great tool that can be adapted into a local plan. Don’t forget to include protocol for regular check-ins throughout Election Day to ensure things are running smoothly.

Master the password problem. A unique, complex password for every component of your voting system and every user is here to stay. Labels and sticky notes with user names, passwords, and hints are a thing of the past. Nothing will discredit the great work you have done like a visitor spotting a password posted next to your EMS workstation. But with so many usernames and passwords, how can the cybersecure election professional remember them all? A password management system is the answer. If you haven’t seen it already, take the 5 minutes to read and share the Center for Democracy and Technology’s field guide for passwords.

Check those forms. A solid ballot reconciliation process and chain of custody is not only good election practice but should be a critical component for post-election audits and certifying your election. Reconciliation forms and custody logs designed poorly can lead to inaccuracies or incomplete forms. It’s not too late to review the guidelines from the Center for Civic Design for creating effective poll worker materials. It also helps to have someone outside of your office try and complete the forms unassisted to determine if the instructions are clear and the form follows a logical order.

Once reconciliation forms are returned to the election office is there a clear assignment to validate the information recorded? There is a tendency on Election Night for poll workers to force the math to work so they can be done. Is someone reviewing chain of custody forms and noting any discrepancies? Are they filled out legibly? Both the reconciliation forms and chains of custody logs provide evidence to validate the way your election was conducted. Make sure poll workers and staff understand their relevance to the integrity of the election.

Lights, camera, action! There is a reason actors rehearse and bands practice. When you only have one day (or a handful of days) to get it right, practice really does make perfect. Nothing sparks doubt about the validity of your election like voters and candidates seeing poll workers or staff disagreeing about a process or providing contradicting statements to the media about your office protocol.  Walking and talking through the motions of your most critical processes ensures everyone gets it right, all the necessary supplies and components are in place, and everyone involved can communicate the process accurately and confidently, especially when you practice the worst-case scenarios.

Although you’re in the weeds of the 2018 midterms, it’s never too early to start thinking about future elections. Before 2020, some states may adopt risk-limiting audit (RLA) procedures. An important first step in a RLA is thinking about how you organize, track and store paper ballots.

A ballot manifest is a log or spreadsheet showing how individual ballots or batches of ballots are stored. The basic components include fields indicating the ID of each individual scanner, a unique number or precinct for the scanned batch, the total number of ballots scanned in the batch, and an ID number to indicate the container the ballots are stored in. Additional best practices include maintaining standard batch sizes, verifying the number of ballots being scanned prior to scanning [using a precision scale to weigh ballots and get a piece count can be quicker, and more accurate, than having someone hand count each batch], and reconciling the ballot manifest to the number of ballots scanned into the election tabulation system on a regular basis.

These are just a few examples of how small changes to a routine process can increase voter confidence and trust in your elections.

(Jennifer Morrell is a consultant for the Democracy Fund. She previously worked as a local elections administrator in Colorado and Utah.)

 

Federal-State Updates

According to Politico, there is a new push to get the Secure Elections Act moving forward. Sen. James Lankford is expected to introduce a revamped version of the bill after the September 30 government funding deadline.  “As I like to say, we’re now fighting over nouns and verbs and prepositions to try to figure exactly how things are working, to make sure it lines up with everyone,” Lankford told Politico.

That being said, Lankford told The Hill that there is no way the Secure Elections Act will be approved by Congress ahead of the November elections. “The House won’t be here after this week so it’s going to be impossible to get passed,” Lankford said of the bill.

One place where Congress does seem to be moving forward is on the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency Act, which has been in the works since the Obama administration, looks like it could be approved by the Senate soon. It was approved by the House last year. Under the bill, the Department of Homeland Security would be given a stand-alone cybersecurity agency, similar the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

Election News This Week

The American Civil Liberties Union of Texas has stepped in on behalf of Spanish-speaking voters in Bexar County who have complained that Spanish translations for last week’s runoff election made no sense. The Spanish-language materials were translated using Google Translate. “The issue we have with that is that it generates translations that are literal and not always meaningful for the reader,” ACLU legal consultant Matthew McCarthy told the San Antonio News-Express. Specifically, in this case the words “election runoff’ were translated into “election water runoff” in Spanish. The ACLU also sent letters to 35 other counties warning that they could be violating the Voting Rights Act for not providing sufficient Spanish translation.

A report from the Maricopa County, Arizona auditor’s office has concluded that malfunctioning voting equipment and the lack of a back-up plan led to 62 polling locations opening late during Arizona’s August primary. According to the Arizona Capitol Times, The Maricopa County Internal Audit Department conducted a review of the election-day problems and found they were tied to the county e-poll books and ballot printing system. In a written response to the auditor’s report, the recorder’s office said that it had already addressed many of the issues and disputed some others. The contractor working with Maricopa County has released a report to The Arizona Republic saying when their technicians arrived, they found a plethora of problems.

The Wisconsin State Elections Commission has unanimously agreed to allow local clerks to reinstate the voter registrations of thousands of Wisconsinites who were removed last year. For the city of Milwaukee that means about 21,000 people will be returned to the rolls.

California Secretary of State Alex Padilla announced this week that 209,577 16- and 17-year-olds have pre-registered to vote. According to the San Francisco Chronicle, since the state’s statewide voter registration database was certified in 2016, more than 104,00 of the pre-registered teens have turned 18 and are now eligible to vote.

A recent poll by the University of North Florida has found overwhelming support for Amendment 4 on Florida’s November ballot. Under Amendment 4, Floridians with felony convictions would automatically have their rights restored upon completion of their sentence or probation. The poll found that 71 percent of potential voters support the amendment. It needs 60 percent approval to pass. According to the Orlando Sentinel, The referendum was placed on the ballot following a statewide petition campaign by Orlando resident Desmond Meade and his group Floridians for Fair Democracy, which successfully gathered more than 799,000 certified signatures. “We are excited that Amendment 4, through the hard work of an energetic grassroots movement, is uniting Floridians across the Sunshine State under the simple belief: when a debt is paid, its paid,” Meade said in a statement. “Regardless of party, gender, or race, Floridians strongly support Amendment 4.”

In other news from the Sunshine State, Floridians are facing one of the longest ballots they have ever seen and many supervisors of elections have been encouraging voters to vote-by-mail or vote early. To bring home just how long the ballot is — four feet — Seminole County Supervisor of Elections Michael Ertel, who is 6’1 and Assistant Supervisor of Elections Rebecca Quinn, who is 5’1 stood with the ballot between them. Hopefully everyone in Florida is busy studying their sample ballots and voter guides.

Personnel News: Bill Freytag is retiring as deputy director of the Richland County, Ohio board of elections. Willie Green, III is the new Yuma County, Arizona elections director. Tracie Fisher has retired as the Transylvania County, North Carolina director of elections. Fisher has been in the elections office for 25 years and the director for three. Lisa Mason has been promoted to state election director for Idaho. Alvina Church, Sangerville, Maine town clerk for 24 years will retire at the end of October.

 

Countdown18 Series

EAC to launch Countdown18 Series

Next week, the U.S. Election Assistance Commission (EAC) is launching Countdown18, a blog series to highlight the innovative security and election administration work states, counties and municipalities are doing to prepare for the 2018 elections on November 6th.  The series will run throughout the month of October until Election Day and will be spearheaded by Cindy Hoffman with the EAC.

Each week the series will be dedicated to a different phase in the election process, including priority issues such as voter registration, cybersecurity efforts, voting equipment updates, access to the vote, and post-election audits. The EAC is proud to highlight the work of election officials across the nation, including work made possible as a result of the recently distributed HAVA funding. The series aims to highlight successful efforts election leaders can consider as they plan for 2020 and beyond, as well as provide voters with a chance to look inside their state and local election offices to see ways election administrators are working to make elections more secure, accessible, and efficient.

There is a lot going on in the lead up to November 6th. Be sure to follow  #Countdown18 on the EAC blog and social media throughout October to get the latest.

 

Legislative News

Federal Legislation: U.S. Sen. Tom Udall (D-New Mexico), vice chairman of the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, and U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D- Minnesota.), ranking member of the Senate Committee on Rules and Administration, introduced S. Res. 631, a Senate resolution recognizing the 50th anniversary of the Indian Civil Rights Act and the importance of expanding voting rights access for American Indians and Alaska Natives.  “This resolution recognizes the resilience and determination of Native peoples in the United States in their fight for equal access to the polls,” Udall said in a statement. “Time after time, for centuries, Native Americans have been denied their fundamental right to make their voices heard in our democracy. And, time after time, Native voters have successfully fought – in the courts and in the halls of Congress – to secure their constitutionally guaranteed right to exercise the franchise.”

California: Gov. Jerry Brown recently signed Assembly Bill No. 2218 into law which will require the secretary of state’s office to come up with an optional ballot tracking system for counties.

Michigan: Under House Bill 4671, state election law would be changed to allow a city or township to engage its county clerk or the state Bureau of Elections to handle the maintenance of their voter registration database. It would also allow the city or township to engage its county clerk or the clerk of another city or township to administer election-related administrative matters on its behalf.

The Michigan House has approved legislation that would allow Michigan to offer online voter registration. The bill was approved with bipartisan support and moves now to the Senate.

New Jersey: Sen. Sam Thompson has introduced a bill that would expand penalties for voter fraud.

Pennsylvania: The Butler County commission unanimously approved a new policy that will allow voters to take their cell phones with them into the polling place and to take ballot selfies. The policy prohibits people from taking photos or videos of other voters and their ballots.

Wyoming: A bill that would allow counties to move to all vote-by-mail elections has been approved by the Joint Corporations, Elections and Political Subdivisions Interim Committee on an 11-2 vote. It’s unclear whether it will come before the full Legislature in the next session.

 

Legal Updates

Arkansas: The Arkansas Supreme Court hear oral arguments last week on the legality of the state’s voter ID law. According to the Arkansas Times, Jeff Priebe, attorney for the plaintiff, argued that the 2017 law was an attempt to circumvent a similar law passed in 2014 that was struck down by the Arkansas Supreme Court. A change was made that allowed voters who didn’t have an ID to cast a provisional ballot and sign an affidavit and the vote is supposed to be counted unless other problems are found.

Georgia: Secretary of State Brian Kemp has filed a notice of appeal after U.S. District Judge Amy Totenberg ruled that although there will be no paper ballots in November, the Coalition of Good Governance had validly stated a claim that the machines used in the state’s election are vulnerable to hacking the case may proceed.

Missouri: U.S. District Judge Brian Wimes has ordered Missouri officials to provide voter registration information to residents seeking to update their addresses at motor vehicle offices or by mail. According to KCUR, Wimes ordered the state to begin doing so immediately.

New Jersey: Lizaida Camis, 55 of Hoboken has been charged with violating the Travel Act for causing mail to be used to aid voter bribery. Camis allegedly paid voters $50 in 2013 to apply for mail ballots and then cast them for candidates that she worked for at the time.

Also in New Jersey, an appellate court has ordered the Passaic County clerk’s office to draft new ballots for November 6 saying the clerk’s decision to include blank columns on the ballots of 15 of the county’s 16 towns was unlawful.

New Hampshire: Spencer McKinnon, 20, has been charged with voting in both New Hampshire and Massachusetts in the 2016 general election. He faces up to seven years in prison if convicted.

North Dakota: In a split decision, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 8th Circuit suspended a federal judge’s April ruling mandating the state accepts IDs and supplemental documentation with a current mailing address as proof of ID in order to vote. According to the Grand Forks Herald, the appeals court noted North Dakota is the only state without voter registration and has a “legitimate interest in requiring identification and a showing of current residence to prevent voter fraud and to safeguard voter confidence.” It said the state would be “irreparably harmed” without a stay as requested by Secretary of State Al Jaeger.

Also in North Dakota, Hannan Yassin Aboubaker of Shakopee, Minnesota entered an Alford plea on a Class A misdemeanor “election offense”. Aboubaker was accused of submitting an absentee ballot in Minnesota as well as voting in person in Fargo.

 

Tech Thursday

Social Media: Twitter is joining other social media platforms like Facebook and Instragram in an effort to get users registered to vote. The program, #BeAVoter was launched in conjunction with TurboVote. Twitter will show users a prompt encouraging them to register to vote. The prompt will include a tweet users can share to encourage others to become a voter.

Social Media: Not to be outdone by Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter, Snapchat has announced a partnership with TurboVote to encourage voter registration. Beginning this week, all Snapchat users—which skew younger than most of the other social networks—over the age of 18 will receive register to vote link directly in their profile page.

California: UCLA recently rolled out MyUCLA with will autofill a California voter registration form with each eligible student’s name and information and send to the secretary of state’s office at the beginning of the fall quarter. According to the Daily Bruin, students will be prompted to double-check the information and will also be able to choose whether to register in Los Angeles or their home district.

 

Opinions This Week

National Opinions: Voting rights, II, III, IV | Election security

Alabama: Voting rights

Arizona: Poll workers

California: Secretary of state race | National Voter Registration Day | Secretary of state race, II | Election consolidation;

Florida: Ex-felon voting rights, II, III, IV | Spanish-language ballots | Vote-by-mail, II, III | Campus early voting site | National Voter Registration Day | Young voters

Georgia: Voting system

Guam: Youth voter registration

Illinois: Automatic voter registration

Indiana: Election security

Kansas: Voter ID

Massachusetts: Student voters

Montana: Missoula County

Nevada: Automatic voter registration

New Hampshire: Secretary of state office | Voter suppression

New York: Election laws

North Carolina: Subpoenas | Florence

Oklahoma: Federal grant money

Pennsylvania: Delaware County | National Voter Registration Day

Tennessee: Ranked-choice voting

Texas: Young voters

Utah: Ranked-choice voting

Vermont: National Voter Registration Day |

Virginia: Voter ID | Hopewell electoral board

West Virginia: Voter list maintenance

Wisconsin: Election security

 

Upcoming Events

EAC Election Readiness Summit – The EAC Election Readiness Summit event aims to inform the public and lawmakers about the steps election leaders can take to ensure secure, accessible, and efficient elections. The summit will also highlight innovative and cost-effective steps election administrators should consider as they look to 2020 and beyond. The event will feature expert panelists and keynote speakers who will examine election security best practices, as well as investments in accessibility, post-election audits, and other vital election activities. Following these discussions, the EAC will host an open house for election vendors who wish to display and demonstrate their equipment. Where: Room 216 of the Hart Senate Office Building and online. When: Wednesday, October 3 from 9am to 4:30pm.

Council of State Governments Annual Conference — The Council of State Government will hold its 2018 National Conference in the Northern Kentucky, Greater Cincinnati area in December. Keynote speakers are J.D. Vance, author of Hillbilly Elegy and Story Musgrave who started life in the Marines and finished is public service at NASA where he spent more than 1,200 hours in space. The conference will include a 2.5 hour session on election cybersecurity communications mapping. Where: Cincinnati, Ohio. When: December 6-8.

International Association of Government Officials — IGO’s 2019 mid-winter conference will be held in Irvine, California, January 6-11, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of State Election Directors — The NASED Winter Conference will be held in Washington DC, February 1-4, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of Secretaries of State — The NASS Winter Conference will be held in Washington, DC, February 1-4, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

International Association of Government Officials — IGO’s 2019 Annual Conference will be held in Houston, Texas, July 11-17. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of Counties — NACo’s 2019 Annual Conference will be held in Clark County (Las Vegas), Nevada July 11-15, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of State Election Directors — The NASED Summer Conference will be held in Austin, Texas, July 14-16, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

 

Job Postings This Week

electionlineWeekly publishes election administration job postings each week as a free service to our readers. To have your job listed in the newsletter, please send a copy of the job description, including a web link to mmoretti@electionline.org.  Job postings must be received by 5pm on Wednesday in order to appear in the Thursday newsletter. Listings will run for three weeks or till the deadline listed in the posting.

Certification Manager (Denver, CO) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Certification Manager to join our team in Denver, CO! This position is a cross -functional leader playing a key role in managing certification efforts for Dominion Voting products. In this role, you will act as a representative of the company with State and Federal certification officials, test labs, and other key internal and external stakeholders throughout the certification process. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Certification Project Manager, Hart InterCivic — The Certification Project Manager manages state and federal certification projects of our Hardware and Software products, under the direction of the Certification Program Manager. The Certification Project Manager must be able to exercise sound judgment and interact with regulatory authorities in a professional manner, particularly in high-pressure situations. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Customer Relations Manager (Phoenix, AZ) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Customer Relations Manager to join our team in Phoenix, AZ! This position will be responsible for effectively and proactively managing the day-to-day relationship, administration and technical/product support of one or more assigned customer accounts. Additionally, the CRM will serve as project manager for specialized projects such as pre- and postelection day support, new product implementations, and/or product upgrades/updates. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Director of Government Affairs, Hart InterCivic — The Hart InterCivic Director of Government Affairs oversees all aspects of support services for Hart’s government relations activities for state and federal government entities. These include: identifying and engaging critical stakeholders at the federal, state, and county level, researching and providing consistent and proactive communication of company’s regulatory strategy, partnering with key internal cross-functional departments, participating in industry forums ensuring active engagement where most critical, and developing monitoring/measurement tools to provide visibility and transparency. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Program Manager, CIS— the Elections Program Manager is assigned to the Elections Infrastructure ISAC (EI-ISAC) at the Center for Internet Security. Reporting to the Director of the EI-ISAC, the Elections Program Manager will partner with other cybersecurity team members to promote the CIS mission and help support our growth. The primary purpose of this position is to serve as a subject matter expert on and represent the EI-ISAC in public forums regarding election infrastructure issues. The Elections Program Manager will work with the EI-ISAC Director to build relationships in the elections community and identify tools, products, and initiatives that meet the security needs of election officials. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Supervisor, Pinal County, Arizona— performs professional and administrative work in planning, organizing and directing strategic and daily goals and objectives, operations and activities of the Elections Department. Work is performed under the general administrative direction of the Elections Director. The employee is expected to exercise initiative, independent judgment and discretion. Salary: $49,647-$56,473. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Field Sales Director, Hart InterCivic — the Field Sales Director works primarily on the road and from a home office when he/she is not on business travel. The Field Sales Director is responsible for creating news sales with prospects and existing clients in a defined region. Today, this role is a single contributor and does not directly manage people.   This position will report to the VP of Sales. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Full Stack Architect / Senior Software Engineer, Clear Ballot— Clear Ballot is looking for an accomplished, Boston MA based Architect/Senior Software Engineer who wants to bring their technical and leadership skills to bear on a hugely consequential problem: Bringing transparency to democratic elections. The successful candidate will implement new products and features under tight deadlines. You will be using primarily Python and MySQL that interface with front-end web applications implemented in JavaScript and HTML5. The ideal candidate should have strong technical and leadership skills and a good working knowledge of the latest concepts in security, performance, and resilience. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build and enhance a platform that is changing the elections industry. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Full Stack Software Developer, Clear Ballot — The successful candidate will build and enhance enterprise-level, highly available applications using primarily Python and MySQL that interface with frontend web applications implemented in JavaScript and HTML5. The ideal candidate should have strong technical skills and a good working knowledge of the latest concepts in performance, security and resilience. One of the hallmarks of our system is its emphasis on new visualization techniques made possible by sophisticated data structures that enable high-performance in a multi-user environment. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build and enhance a platform that is changing the elections industry. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Inside Sales Representative, Runbeck — to support our desired growth and market expansion, we continue to hire outstanding talent in multiple departments. We are looking for highly motivated, dedicated and talented individuals who will be able to contribute significantly to the success of the company while receiving great opportunities for professional growth and financial benefits. Responsibilities include: Contact potential or existing customers to inform them about a product or service; ability to present solution and its value to a prospect over the phone; answer questions about products or the company; ask questions to understand customer requirements and close sales; enter and update customer information in the database; keep records of calls and sale and note useful information in the CRM; process orders in an accurate manner; and go the “extra mile” to meet sales quota and facilitate future sales. Application: In order to apply, please send a resume to Tammy White: twhite@runbeck.net.

Program Manager, Overseas Voting Initiative, Council of State Governments — the Program Manager of CSG’s Overseas Voting Initiative, funded through a cooperative agreement with the US Dept. of Defense (DOD) Federal Voting Assistance Program (FVAP), provides day-to-day management and oversight of the Initiative, including research and policy analysis of electronic absentee voting systems for military voters, and development and dissemination of educational policy programming and deliverables to state leaders in support of the cooperative agreement. The Program Manager works within CSG’s Center of Innovation and in cooperation with CSG’s policy and executive management teams as well as regional offices, affiliates and members to support, monitor and improve state elections processes for military and overseas voters. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Project Manager (Austin, TX) – Hart InterCivic — Hart InterCivic is looking for a project manager to work with our Professional Services Team.  The project manager oversees the deployment of voting systems and training to both existing and new Hart customers. The ideal candidate has experience in the elections industry, is PMP certified, and is motivated to achieve success for our customers with initiative.  Travel up to 80 percent. Reports to the Manager of Professional Services. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Sales Engineer, Clear Ballot — Our Sales and Marketing team is looking for a seasoned, hardworking and energetic Sales Engineer with proven experience and a passion for selling technology solutions. This role is responsible for being the primary technical resource for our sales force while also actively driving and managing the technology evaluation stage of the sales process. You will be required to have an in-depth technical knowledge of Clear Ballot’s Clear Vote suite and demonstrating the product capabilities to prospective customers. The ideal candidate must also be able to identify and provide reliable solutions for all technical issues to assure complete customer satisfaction. Measures of success include new customer acquisition rates, renewal rates, upselling, cross-selling, customer satisfaction and contribution to overall sales team and new customer success Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Senior Level Software Developer, BPro — We are a well-established small business that has been developing requirements and producing software for the needs of state governments since 1985 and continue to maintain and upgrade many of those systems. We have offices in Pierre, South Dakota, Fargo, North Dakota, Minnesota & Virginia. We’re currently looking for an energetic and intelligent .Net Developer to join our growing team. Our ideal candidate is one who loves to learn, enjoys working as a team, and who can multitask and meet deadlines. Skills required: .NET, VB, VBA, ASP, SQL, HTML, and JavaScript. A four-year college degree is the minimum educational requirement. All applicants must have excellent written and verbal communications skills. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Senior Software Developer, Runbeck— Runbeck Election Services is looking for full stack enthusiasts who are comfortable tackling end-to-end and enjoy building products that solve big problems and delight customers. We’re a collaborative team who knows how to get things done (Lone Rangers need not apply). We believe that small teams focused on shipping software move the fastest and make the most impact. The ideal candidate for this position has extensive back end skills (C#, MVC, ASP.Net, SQL Server) paired with solid web and desktop skills (IIS, JavaScript, HTML 5, CSS, jQuery, WPF, Win Forms). Must have a solid grasp of our basic toolset (Jira, Visual Studio). Willing to learn new plug-ins and IDE enhancements in order to boost your productivity and are excited to introduce us to new tooling experiences that have worked for you in the past. You bring discipline and care about implementation practices. You are familiar with Agile/Scrum processes, practice common design patterns, embrace clean coding principles, and employ many other techniques in an effort to bring a high level of software craftsmanship to your finished product. Application: In order to apply, please send a resume to Tammy White: twhite@runbeck.net.

Software Product Specialist II (Phoenix, AZ) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Software Product Specialist II to join our team in Phoenix, AZ! This position will be responsible for delivering a wide variety of technical and non-technical customer support services related to the implementation, operation, repair, maintenance and upgrades of Dominion Voting Systems technology products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Systems Engineer, Clear Ballot — We are looking for a talented Systems Engineer who has both a technical and services/support background which enables them to quickly assess customer needs and offer value to Clear Ballot’s customers. The Systems Engineer will gain a deep understanding of how Clear Ballot’s products operate and their optimal configuration to build a streamlined installation process of the Clear Vote election system. The ideal candidate for this position can prioritize mission critical tasks and coordinate the implementation and expansion of our systems. They will be able to work directly with customers, display innovation, think conceptually and act tactically to build consensus around system installation and enhancement and meet deadlines. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

 

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In Focus This Week

September 20, 2018

September 20, 2018

In Focus This Week

CEIR voter registration database security report
Survey finds most states adopted best cybersecurity practices since ‘16

The Center for Election Innovation and Research (CEIR) has released a new report based on a survey of 26 states conducted between June and July of 2018 to assess the current state of security around voter registration databases (VRDBs).

The survey results, released ahead of National Voter Registration Day, show that immense progress has been made in securing voter registration databases since 2016, though significant room for improvement remains for states to strengthen their defenses against hacking attempts.

Voter registration databases have been a central focus of conversations around election security since the 2016 presidential election when several voter registration databases were scanned and at least one infiltrated by Russian operatives.

Amid concerns on the security and integrity of the upcoming midterms, the report provides a clear picture of the tangible improvements that have taken place to ensure voters can trust the democratic process this November.

The report finds that a significant majority of responding states:

  • Regularly train voter registration database users to detect cyber threats, like phishing
  • Consistently monitor for improper access to their database
  • Use secure HTTPS for websites with sensitive information
  • Employ tools to prevent distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks
  • Utilize recommended email protection tools
  • Back up their database daily – and regularly test the backup

However, states can do better when it comes to implementing more secure password requirements and further adopting multi-factor authentication.

“The survey shows just how much progress states have made since 2016 in key areas of cybersecurity to prevent, detect, and mitigate foreign interference,” said David Becker, executive director of CEIR.

CEIR is a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization working to improve election administration through research, data, and technology. CEIR works with experts and election officials in every state and across the political spectrum to rebuild voter confidence in our elections and democracy, ensure all eligible voters can vote conveniently in a system with maximum integrity, and ultimately increase voter participation.

The survey consisted of 23 multiple-choice questions addressing three major areas of cybersecurity: (1) prevention, (2) detection, and (3) mitigation. The survey was sent to election officials in all fifty states and the District of Columbia. Of those, twenty-six states returned completed surveys.

Additionally, one state was able to contribute a small number of answers but declined to respond to most of the survey questions. That state’s answers are included in the analysis of the questions to which they responded. Three other states returned surveys which declined to answer any of the questions due to security considerations. Thus, those three states are disregarded in data-reporting and analysis.

This report details the results of the survey, while contextualizing the importance of certain security measures in maintaining a well-protected VRDB.

“There is no finish line in cybersecurity, so Congress and state legislatures will need to provide elections officials with a consistent funding stream to continue to improve their training and protocols around election cybersecurity,” Becker said.

To read the full report, click here.

(The Center for Election Innovation and Research is a grantee of the Democracy Fund although grant monies were not used to produce this report.)

 

Federal-State Updates

Late last week, the House Oversight Committee held a classified briefing on election security. According to The Washington Times, Chairman Trey Gowdy’s office reported that the Department of Homeland Security sent two top elections officials and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence sent officials that deal with Russia and Eurasia. The national intelligence officer for cyber issues of the ODNI was part of the briefing, as was the FBI’s Deputy Assistant Director Joe Bonavolonta and the Justice Department’s Deputy Assistant Attorney General for the National Security Division Adam Hickey.

“As we near midterm elections, we must take every step possible to safeguard our electoral process and ensure our fellow citizens have confidence in the security of elections,” Gowdy, R-S.C., said in a statement.

 

Primary Updates

New York: New York held the final primary of the 2018 election season on Thursday the 13th. In New York City, multiple voters reported problems with their names not appearing on voter rolls although they had recently voted. A larger turnout than expected in Erie County mean some polling places ran low on ballots. In Monroe County, officials are looking into how/why some voters were given the wrong ballot in Rochester. And in Orange County, paving near a polling place in Silver Lake was causing headaches for voters trying to park at the fire house and vote.

Research & Report Summaries

Research and Report Summaries are provided by Sean Greene. Greene has served as the director of research for the U.S. Election Assistance Commission and the Pew Center on the States Election Initiatives. He currently lives in Rome where he is studying Italian, drinking Moretti beer and still paying close attention to the administration of elections in the United States. He’s looking forward to casting his first ballot as a UOCAVA voter.

An Assessment of Minority Voting Rights Access in the United States – United States Commission on Civil Rights, September 2018: This report assesses minority voter access and evaluates the Department of Justice’s enforcement of the Voting Rights Act (VRA) since 2006, focusing on the time after the Supreme Court’s Shelby County v. Holder decision which held that provisions of the VRA unconstitutionally determined which jurisdictions needed federal government preclearance to change voting procedures. Findings include:

  • Laws and procedures like requiring photo ID at the polls, cutting back early voting times and locations, and closing polling places are impacting minority voting rights.
  • Without preclearance, elections have occurred under laws that were later found in court to be intentionally discriminatory against communities of color.
  • Enforcement and litigation under Section 2 of the VRA is an inadequate for protecting voting rights.

Election News This Week

A new poll from National Public Radio and Marist found that about 1 in 3 American adults think that a foreign country is likely to change vote tallies and results in the upcoming midterms. That being said. The majority of Americans think that efforts to make this year’s voting more secure are adequate, as 53 percent said they think the U.S. is either very prepared or prepared to keep the midterms safe and secure. Conversely, nearly 40 percent of Americans doubt that preparation. “There’s been so much saturation of [Russia] discussions,” Neal Kelley, the registrar of voters for Orange County, California told NPR. “You can’t help but have a segment of the population that’s going to feel that way. But the bottom line is, there have been so many things done since 2016, to prepare for 2018.”

Florence News: The impacts of Hurricane Florence on the 2018 midterm election still remain to be seen, but already the storm is causing angst. The North Carolina state board of elections & ethics enforcement said in a statement that it is communicating with elections officials in the state’s counties. The state has taken over sending ballots on behalf of some counties that are unable to do so because of flooding. Fortunately for Fairfax County, Virginia, which uses a printing plan in New Bern, North Carolina to print election ballots, the ballot arrived at the county elections office just a few days before the storm hit.

The Washington County, Ohio board of elections will be employing some special helpers on Election Day in November. The BOE has partnered with WASCO, Inc. and Ewing School, two nonprofits that work with adults with developmental disabilities. The six volunteers will serve as greeters at polling places. “We got the idea when we went to our summer conference and learned that another county with a similar set-up to WASCO and Ewing were having them volunteer,” Washington County Board of Elections Director Mandy Amos told the Marietta Times. “We thought maybe we could have them as volunteers too and they could greet people and show them around from when you check in to where you pick up your ballot, or they could hand out stickers, too.” Two volunteers interviewed by the Times said they were most excited to hand out “I Voted” stickers and we think that’s pretty awesome!

Everyone is going back to school! Recently the Livingston County, Michigan Human Services Collaborative held the “Accessible Voting For All” class that taught voters with disabilities and those who may need assistance how to cast their ballot this fall. Anne Richardson, director of the Arc Livingston told WHMI the class discussed issues like how to use voting equipment, the process, citizens’ rights, what to expect, and why it’s important to vote. About 45 people attended the class.

If you happen to be in Rhode Island between now and November 23, consider stopping by the State Archives in Providence to check out an exhibit called “Voting in Rhode Island: 380 years of ‘I voted’”. According to WPRI, the exhibit includes 19th and 20th century ballots and ballot readers and original 17th century documents about election results and the earliest legislation providing for proxy and absentee voting. There’s also an “I’m a Voter” selfie station is outside the state archives so voters can show their commitment to voting.

Maestro, or in this case Yara Shahidi and Jimmy Fallon, play us out please!

Personnel News: Walter Foeman, Miami, Florida city clerk has announced that he will retire as of December 31. Congratulations to former Milton, Wisconsin Clerk Nancy Zastro who was recently awarded the Wisconsin Municipal Clerks Association Lifetime Achievement Award. Denise Smith has been named to the Portage County, Ohio board of elections. Adams County, Wisconsin Clerk Cindy Phillippi has resigned.

 

Legislative Updates

California: Gov. Jerry Brown has signed the Every Vote Counts Act into law. Under the new law, voters will be provided an opportunity to verify signatures on their vote-by-mail ballots.

Maine: The Maine Legislature adjourned for the year without being able to muster the votes to override Gov. Paul LePage’s veto of a bill that would have provided additional funding to the secretary of state’s office to cover the costs of using ranked-choice voting in the November election.

New York: The state Senate has announced that it will hold hearings into Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s executive order that automatically restored the voting rights of more than 24,000 parolees. “I am troubled by the seeming automatic release of cop killers, sex offenders and violent felons who now have had their rights restored through a questionable process,” Sen. Pat Gallivan (R-Erie County), who chairs the Criminal Justice Committee told The New York Post. The hearings will be held on Oct. 1 and 2 in Albany and on Long Island

Vermont: This week, the Winooski City Council blocked a ballot initiative that would have asked residents whether or not voting rights should be extended to documented non-citizens in local elections. City Manager Jesse Backer told the Burlington Free Press that the decision to keep the question off the ballot was so that there could be more community engagement about the issue.

 

Legal Updates

Federal Lawsuits: The Center for Human Rights and Constitutional Law has field a federal lawsuit against the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (ICE) arguing that they believe the current administration is purposefully slowing down the naturalization process before the November election. The plaintiffs demand records, data, and any information about possible changes in training for the officers who interview the applicants. It is alleged that some interviewers have departed from protocol and engaged in extreme vetting.

Alabama: Twitter users who have been blocked by Secretary of State John Merrill have sued in federal court arguing that he’s blocking their right to free speech. Merrill told The Associated Press on Wednesday that he has blocked people he considers harassing, rude or who “won’t listen to reason.” But he said he is one of the most accessible and personally available elected officials in the history of the state of Alabama.” Merrill said blocking Twitter users “doesn’t stop them from communicating with me” in other formats, including his cellphone. Merrill said he lists his cellphone number on his office business card that he hands out to the public.

Arizona: Judge James Teilborg has refused to order the secretary of state’s office to immediately update voter registration addresses of 384,000 Arizonans who moved since the last election. Teilborg acknowledged that the state is in violation of the National Voter Registration Act but said that it would cause chaos too soon before the election to change all the registrations.

Georgia: U.S. District Judge Amy Totenberg denied a request for an injunction that would have forced the state to switch from DRE voting machines to paper ballots by November 6. According to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, in her 46-page order said she was concerned about “voter frustration and disaffection from the voting process” if she had prohibited electronic voting machines just weeks before the election. “There is nothing like bureaucratic confusion and long lines to sour a citizen,” Totenberg wrote.

Also in Georgia this week, a federal judge has ordered the redo of an election for a North Georgia House district voters where human error led to dozens of voters casting ballots in the wrong race. The new primary will be held Dec. 4.

Kansas: The American Civil Liberties Union is suing Johnson County in order to get the names of the voters whose provisional ballots were denied in the August primary.

New Hampshire: Grace Fleming, 70 and John Fleming, 71 have been indicted for casting an absentee ballot in New Hampshire while also voting in Massachusetts in 2016 general election. If convicted, they could face up to 14 years in prison.

New Jersey: According to the New Jersey Globe, Republicans will appeal an order issued by a Superior Court Judge on Thursday instructing the Passaic County Clerk to eliminate dead space on the ballot caused by special elections in the 38th district, a move that potentially helps Democrats to win a County Clerk seat Republicans have held for the last ten years.

Texas: Laura Janeth Garza has been convicted of illegally voting in the 2016 election. Garza, not a U.S. citizen, used her cousin’s identity to register to vote. She is facing deportation.

In Starr County, the county and the American Civil Rights Union have reached a settlement in a suit filed by the ACRU over the county’s voting lists. Under the agreement, in addition to paying legal fees, the county has agreed to actively work to identify and remove deceased voters from the rolls.

Also in Texas, U.S. District Judge Nelva Gonzales Ramos issued a two-sentence order dismissing the lawsuit challenging the state’s voter ID law.

West Virginia: Four former employees of the secretary of state’s office that had filed wrongful termination lawsuits against Secretary of State Mac Warner have settled out of court for a total of nearly $1 million.

Also in West Virginia, Jeffrey Hartman, 72, has been arrested for voting illegally in West Virginia and Maryland. An investigation by the secretary of state’s office and the Morgan County sheriff’s department found that Hartman has property in both states and the voted in multiple elections for several years in both states.

 

Tech Thursday

Tech Companies: Symantec announced this week that it is offering a free new tool to campaigns and election officials that will help fight against fraudulent websites. With the new service, Symantec is repurposing a tool it already used for its paying customers and making it publicly available. SpoofProof takes images of legitimate websites and scans the internet looking for similar sites.

Social Media: Instagram is getting in on the GOTV bandwagon. The social media site plan to run ads in Stories and feed powered by TurboVote that will target all U.S. users over the age of 18 and point them towards information on how to get registered to vote and what the voting rules are. In addition, on Election Day, Instagram users will be able to add an “I Voted” sticker to their photos.

Social Media: Facebook is also partnering with TurboVote as well as the International Republican Institute and the National Democratic Institute to push users of the social media site to register to vote and then to cast a ballot.

Massachusetts: Early voting is still relatively new in Massachusetts and this week the city of Boston launched a new website, Vote Early Boston that will provide information about how and where to vote early.

Oregon: This week, the Oregon secretary of state’s office announced an initiative to use Facebook to bolster participation by reminding hundreds of thousands of inactive voters to update their voter registration. The initiative will be cross-referencing the inactive voters list with the Facebook data of those who list Oregon as their home state. Those users will then get a reminder to register to vote. According to the Lewiston Tribune, the video outreach features Richardson speaking directly to voters who have been listed as inactive, encouraging them to update their registration to receive a ballot in the mail. A link will be included for voters to take care of their registration

 

Opinions This Week

National Opinions: Election security | Transgender voters | College-aged voters | Voter registration | Vote at home | Voting rights

Alabama: Voting rights

Arizona: Maricopa County | Poll worker pay

Arkansas: Vote-by-mail

Delaware: Ballot access

Florida: Ex-felon voting rights, II, III |  Early voting sites | Election chaos | Voter registration

Georgia: Voting system, II

Illinois: Cybersecurity

Indiana: Election security

Iowa: Voter ID | Cybersecurity

Louisiana: Secretary of state race

Massachusetts: Lowell elections

Michigan: Voter access laws | First-time voters

New Mexico: Voter access

New York: Voting problems, II, III, IV | Automatic voter registration

North Carolina: Subpoenas

North Dakota: Voter ID

Ohio: Secretary of state race

Pennsylvania: Preferential voting

Tennessee: Ballot language | Voting rights

Texas: Young voters

Utah: St. George County

Virginia: Voting system

Washington: Paid postage | King County

 

Upcoming Events

International Association of Government Officials — IGO’s 2019 mid-winter conference will be held in Irvine, California, January 6-11, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of State Election Directors — The NASED Winter Conference will be held in Washington DC, February 1-4, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of Secretaries of State — The NASS Winter Conference will be held in Washington, DC, February 1-4, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

International Association of Government Officials — IGO’s 2019 Annual Conference will be held in Houston, Texas, July 11-17. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of Counties — NACo’s 2019 Annual Conference will be held in Clark County (Las Vegas), Nevada July 11-15, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of State Election Directors — The NASED Summer Conference will be held in Austin, Texas, July 14-16, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

 

Job Postings This Week

electionlineWeekly publishes election administration job postings each week as a free service to our readers. To have your job listed in the newsletter, please send a copy of the job description, including a web link to mmoretti@electionline.org.  Job postings must be received by 5pm on Wednesday in order to appear in the Thursday newsletter. Listings will run for three weeks or till the deadline listed in the posting.

Certification Manager (Denver, CO) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Certification Manager to join our team in Denver, CO! This position is a cross -functional leader playing a key role in managing certification efforts for Dominion Voting products. In this role, you will act as a representative of the company with State and Federal certification officials, test labs, and other key internal and external stakeholders throughout the certification process. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Customer Relations Manager (Phoenix, AZ) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Customer Relations Manager to join our team in Phoenix, AZ! This position will be responsible for effectively and proactively managing the day-to-day relationship, administration and technical/product support of one or more assigned customer accounts. Additionally, the CRM will serve as project manager for specialized projects such as pre- and postelection day support, new product implementations, and/or product upgrades/updates. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Program Manager, CIS— the Elections Program Manager is assigned to the Elections Infrastructure ISAC (EI-ISAC) at the Center for Internet Security. Reporting to the Director of the EI-ISAC, the Elections Program Manager will partner with other cybersecurity team members to promote the CIS mission and help support our growth. The primary purpose of this position is to serve as a subject matter expert on and represent the EI-ISAC in public forums regarding election infrastructure issues. The Elections Program Manager will work with the EI-ISAC Director to build relationships in the elections community and identify tools, products, and initiatives that meet the security needs of election officials. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Supervisor, Pinal County, Arizona— performs professional and administrative work in planning, organizing and directing strategic and daily goals and objectives, operations and activities of the Elections Department. Work is performed under the general administrative direction of the Elections Director. The employee is expected to exercise initiative, independent judgment and discretion. Salary: $49,647-$56,473. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Field Sales Director, Hart InterCivic — the Field Sales Director works primarily on the road and from a home office when he/she is not on business travel. The Field Sales Director is responsible for creating news sales with prospects and existing clients in a defined region. Today, this role is a single contributor and does not directly manage people.   This position will report to the VP of Sales. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Full Stack Architect / Senior Software Engineer, Clear Ballot— Clear Ballot is looking for an accomplished, Boston MA based Architect/Senior Software Engineer who wants to bring their technical and leadership skills to bear on a hugely consequential problem: Bringing transparency to democratic elections. The successful candidate will implement new products and features under tight deadlines. You will be using primarily Python and MySQL that interface with front-end web applications implemented in JavaScript and HTML5. The ideal candidate should have strong technical and leadership skills and a good working knowledge of the latest concepts in security, performance, and resilience. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build and enhance a platform that is changing the elections industry. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Full Stack Software Developer, Clear Ballot — The successful candidate will build and enhance enterprise-level, highly available applications using primarily Python and MySQL that interface with frontend web applications implemented in JavaScript and HTML5. The ideal candidate should have strong technical skills and a good working knowledge of the latest concepts in performance, security and resilience. One of the hallmarks of our system is its emphasis on new visualization techniques made possible by sophisticated data structures that enable high-performance in a multi-user environment. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build and enhance a platform that is changing the elections industry. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Inside Sales Representative, Runbeck — to support our desired growth and market expansion, we continue to hire outstanding talent in multiple departments. We are looking for highly motivated, dedicated and talented individuals who will be able to contribute significantly to the success of the company while receiving great opportunities for professional growth and financial benefits. Responsibilities include: Contact potential or existing customers to inform them about a product or service; ability to present solution and its value to a prospect over the phone; answer questions about products or the company; ask questions to understand customer requirements and close sales; enter and update customer information in the database; keep records of calls and sale and note useful information in the CRM; process orders in an accurate manner; and go the “extra mile” to meet sales quota and facilitate future sales. Application: In order to apply, please send a resume to Tammy White: twhite@runbeck.net.

Program Manager, Overseas Voting Initiative, Council of State Governments — the Program Manager of CSG’s Overseas Voting Initiative, funded through a cooperative agreement with the US Dept. of Defense (DOD) Federal Voting Assistance Program (FVAP), provides day-to-day management and oversight of the Initiative, including research and policy analysis of electronic absentee voting systems for military voters, and development and dissemination of educational policy programming and deliverables to state leaders in support of the cooperative agreement. The Program Manager works within CSG’s Center of Innovation and in cooperation with CSG’s policy and executive management teams as well as regional offices, affiliates and members to support, monitor and improve state elections processes for military and overseas voters. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Project Manager (Austin, TX) – Hart InterCivic — Hart InterCivic is looking for a project manager to work with our Professional Services Team.  The project manager oversees the deployment of voting systems and training to both existing and new Hart customers. The ideal candidate has experience in the elections industry, is PMP certified, and is motivated to achieve success for our customers with initiative.  Travel up to 80 percent. Reports to the Manager of Professional Services. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Sales Engineer, Clear Ballot — Our Sales and Marketing team is looking for a seasoned, hardworking and energetic Sales Engineer with proven experience and a passion for selling technology solutions. This role is responsible for being the primary technical resource for our sales force while also actively driving and managing the technology evaluation stage of the sales process. You will be required to have an in-depth technical knowledge of Clear Ballot’s Clear Vote suite and demonstrating the product capabilities to prospective customers. The ideal candidate must also be able to identify and provide reliable solutions for all technical issues to assure complete customer satisfaction. Measures of success include new customer acquisition rates, renewal rates, upselling, cross-selling, customer satisfaction and contribution to overall sales team and new customer success Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Senior Level Software Developer, BPro — We are a well-established small business that has been developing requirements and producing software for the needs of state governments since 1985 and continue to maintain and upgrade many of those systems. We have offices in Pierre, South Dakota, Fargo, North Dakota, Minnesota & Virginia. We’re currently looking for an energetic and intelligent .Net Developer to join our growing team. Our ideal candidate is one who loves to learn, enjoys working as a team, and who can multitask and meet deadlines. Skills required: .NET, VB, VBA, ASP, SQL, HTML, and JavaScript. A four-year college degree is the minimum educational requirement. All applicants must have excellent written and verbal communications skills. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Senior Software Developer, Runbeck— Runbeck Election Services is looking for full stack enthusiasts who are comfortable tackling end-to-end and enjoy building products that solve big problems and delight customers. We’re a collaborative team who knows how to get things done (Lone Rangers need not apply). We believe that small teams focused on shipping software move the fastest and make the most impact. The ideal candidate for this position has extensive back end skills (C#, MVC, ASP.Net, SQL Server) paired with solid web and desktop skills (IIS, JavaScript, HTML 5, CSS, jQuery, WPF, Win Forms). Must have a solid grasp of our basic toolset (Jira, Visual Studio). Willing to learn new plug-ins and IDE enhancements in order to boost your productivity and are excited to introduce us to new tooling experiences that have worked for you in the past. You bring discipline and care about implementation practices. You are familiar with Agile/Scrum processes, practice common design patterns, embrace clean coding principles, and employ many other techniques in an effort to bring a high level of software craftsmanship to your finished product. Application: In order to apply, please send a resume to Tammy White: twhite@runbeck.net.

Software Product Specialist II (Phoenix, AZ) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Software Product Specialist II to join our team in Phoenix, AZ! This position will be responsible for delivering a wide variety of technical and non-technical customer support services related to the implementation, operation, repair, maintenance and upgrades of Dominion Voting Systems technology products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Systems Engineer, Clear Ballot — We are looking for a talented Systems Engineer who has both a technical and services/support background which enables them to quickly assess customer needs and offer value to Clear Ballot’s customers. The Systems Engineer will gain a deep understanding of how Clear Ballot’s products operate and their optimal configuration to build a streamlined installation process of the Clear Vote election system. The ideal candidate for this position can prioritize mission critical tasks and coordinate the implementation and expansion of our systems. They will be able to work directly with customers, display innovation, think conceptually and act tactically to build consensus around system installation and enhancement and meet deadlines. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

 

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In Focus This Week

September 13, 2018

September 13, 2018

In Focus This Week

Creating a culture of proactive security
Colorado’s EPIC TTX prepares for almost any scenario

By M. Mindy Moretti
electionline.org

There was a fire, a tornado, and the heating system went down in the ballot-tabulation room. There was fake news on social media and real news media in the room. Polls opened late and stayed open late.

The state voter registration database went down. Tabulation machines failed to tabulate. There were concerned citizens and advocates demanding to know what was happening.

And then there was Olga from Sputnik News who seemed overly curious about everything.

Those were just some of the scenarios and situations faced by Colorado county elections officials and staff participating in the secretary of states EPIC table top exercise last week in Englewood.

The day-long EPIC TTX was based on a similar tabletop training exercise conducted by the Belfer Center in March of this year with 38 state elections officials and was designed to help prepare county elections officials and their staff for any and every possibility.

And based on reactions from county clerks in attendance, the effort of the secretary of state’s office was well worth it and many county clerk left Englewood vowing to put what they had learned into action immediately.

“I immediately met with my county administrator to discuss cyber security within my office and throughout our county offices, for both right now and what it could look like in the future,” said Eryn Wintz, Mineral County clerk and recorder. “I also had a very honest discussion about my security and contingency plan that included actual practices and how to protect myself and by reflection the state by not being the “weakest link” because of limitations set by logistics or financial restraints.”

The morning was divided into two sessions. In the first hour-long session, the groups drilled through problems and situations that could arise in the five months leading up to Election Day. During the second one-hour session it was Election Day.

Moderators, which included elections officials from other states, national association staff and staff from the secretary of state’s office helped move the sessions along. All participants were assigned a role for the day, some of those roles are not who they are in real life.

Pulling off the EPIX TTX was a massive undertaking for the secretary of state’s office, but one that seems worth the effort. According to Judd Choate, director of elections, things went amazingly well.

“Better than even my most optimistic expectations,” Choate said. “Our county election officials have been effusive in their praise. More importantly, I know they walked out with a long ‘to do’ list that will lead to more security Colorado elections. So it was a huge success.”

Choate wasn’t always so sure it was going to be the success that it was though.

“Trevor Timmons (Colorado CIO), Caleb Thornton (Colorado elections legal), along with Jennifer Morrell (Democracy Fund), Amber McReynolds (Nationall Vote at Home), Dan Volkosh (Denver Elections) and I came home from the Belfer event in March and decided to roll it out for this election,” he explained. “That might have been a strategic error – because the time commitment was extraordinary, but I’m pleased we did it.”

There were three informal teams for 1) scenario development, 2) logistics, and 3) counties, moderators, and observers (press too) coordination.

“We will make several adjustments for future EPICs, but the basic format and scenarios worked very well,” Choate said.

The tabletop exercise cost about $100,000 because the state paid for all county and moderator travel. Over 300 people attended, most of whom needed reimbursement (hotel, meals, mileage). The state will use the new HAVA funds to pay for the training.

Following lunch, where Department of Homeland Security  Secretary of State Kirstjen Nielsen addressed the gathering and called Colorado’s elections the most secure in the nation, the participants met based on their roles during the exercises to debrief and come up with five to six takeaways from their roles.

Communications and takeaways
The big takeaway from the day seemed to be communication. Either with the press, between the state and counties or between county clerks and their staff and the public, the importance of communication was brought up time and time again.

“Well since they hammered communication, I have to say that, right? No, really I think communication is vital,” said LaRita Randolph, Dolores County clerk and recorder. “Whether it means County to State, County to County & County to voters. We all need to be on the same page & good communication is the only way for that to be accomplished.”

Interestingly enough, Choate said that one issue the secretary’s office had in pulling of the TTX was with the media.

“The press were a bit more demanding than we anticipated,” Choate said. “We will adjust to that in the future. At least the coverage was good.”

Communication was also something that Lori Mitchell, Chaffee County clerk and recorder and current president of the Colorado County Clerks Association said she could be learn a thing or two about.

“I thought I was a good communicator, but I learned that I have some work to do especially around involving more of or staff and others in our County Government,” Mitchell said. “Another valuable thing for me was to role play another position so that you learned about a different job than you normally do.”

Alton Dillard, the Denver Elections PIO said for him it was interesting to interact with elections officials from jurisdictions of different sizes and learn what their experiences working with the media have been like. In a reversal of roles, Dillard portrayed a reporter during the EPIC TTX so he got to ask questions of participants that were based on the ones he gets on daily basis.

“The way it was set up, a lot of the people playing the PIO role weren’t PIOs in real life so it was an eyeopener for them too,” Dillard said. “As a 13 year Elections PIO, (and Dean of the Colorado delegation when it comes to specializing in election communications) EPIC also illustrated the evolving narrative around elections especially in today’s social media era and with elections security being front page news . The scenarios from the injects that occurred at EPIC could also occur overnight and that’s why it’s important to monitor your social media accounts constantly.”

Several county officials were overheard mentioning that they wished they had brought their PIOs with them to the event. Dillard said the one thing he hopes the clerks take back to their PIOs is the importance of making sure that they are looped in early and often and keeping their communications plan updated.

“Your communicator can’t be the last to know what may be going on in today’s environment,” Dillard said.

In addition to communication, there were lots of important takeaways from the day, but for Wintz from Mineral County, she said it was hard to just pick one.

“Perhaps the most important for me was a simple call to up my game. That encompasses so many things. The reality of the importance, the very real threat of infiltration, the target on Colorado that could by default be directed to the smallest and most rural counties,” Wintz said. “Also the appreciation for the people I have the privilege of working with, their tenacity, intelligence, and supportive nature.”

The secretary of state’s office even learned a thing or two during EPIC.

“We learned that it’s one thing to have a plan,” Choate said. “It’s another altogether to convey that plan to county election officials. So, we need to work on our communication strategy for basic election security as well as acute circumstances that require immediate action.”

DHS participation
In addition to luncheon remarks by the DHS secretary, there were more than 15 DHS officials at EPIC moderating, observing and participating the training.

“Their contributions were essential to our success,” Choate said. “David Stern led a team of seven DHS trainers who flew in to serve as moderators (at no cost to us). They were especially important. I’m humbled by how much effort DHS is expending on helping states and localities secure elections. Between funding EI-ISAC, running and assisting in elections TTXs, and the extraordinary resources they have to offer, the DHS is clearly all-in on election security. The DHS election team even ripped off some fantastic “Last Mile” posters for us that each county took home to post in their office.”

Next steps
Choate said the secretary’s office they would like to do reginal versions during one of their training cycles and do a full EPIC, with all counties represented on the odd years going forward.

The clerks in attendance that we spoke to all highly recommended that those states that haven’t done tabletop exercises like this really should.

“As Election Administrators, we have to take voter confidence seriously,” Randolph said. “Not just their perceptions, but also facts, and keep our elections secure.”

Mitchell from Chaffee County said that in addition to states doing a similar tabletop exercise, counties too should consider putting on their own TTX.

“Every state should replicate this exercise and adapt it to their voting model and procedures. It was so beneficial,” Mitchell said. “I want to do a scaled down version at the County level.”

And Choate said the Colorado secretary of state’s office is ready to help!

“The first thing I would say is – go all out. Your locals will learn more if you have them live it,” Choate said. “Second, there are a lot of people out there who can help. I’m happy to help for one, but DHS is a great resource, and all the election officials around the country who have been doing these themselves (NC, IL, WI, WA, WV, etc.). It’s a lot of work, so take your time and do it right. But, those of us who have lived it can help you cut some corners without missing the essential learning experience.”

Update on the News: Following the publication of our story last week about how states handle international IPs, we heard back from a few more states on their process. The story has been updated and can be found here.

Federal-State Updates

This week, President Donald J. Trump signed an executive order authorizing sanctions against foreigners who meddle in U.S. elections.

“We felt it was important to demonstrate the president has taken command of this issue, that it’s something he cares deeply about — that the integrity of our elections and our constitutional process are a high priority to him,” national security adviser John Bolton said, according to The Associated Press.

The order calls for sanctioning any individual, company or country that interferes with campaign infrastructure, such as voter registration databases, voting machines and equipment used for tabulating or transmitting results. It also authorizes sanctions for engaging in covert, fraudulent or deceptive activities, such as distributing disinformation or propaganda, to influence or undermine confidence in U.S. elections.

Primary Updates

Delaware: Voters in the First State went to the polls on Thursday the 6th and there were no reports of any issues. A petition to audit the elections results was started by one campaign, but the state moved forward with certification without the audit. The Delaware State News did note that despite the fact that the election was on a Thursday and not the typical Tuesday, voter turnout was impressive.

Massachusetts: Following last week’s primary election, the office of Secretary of State William Galvin (D) has taken over the operations elections departments in Lowell and Lawrence while the office investigates their practices.

New Hampshire: Voters in the Granite State hit the polls on Tuesday, Sept. 11 and there were no reports of problems. Turnout was hit or miss. Londonderry Town Clerk Sherry Farrell noted that the polls had been quite busy despite the fact that there were many uncontested races on the ballot. University of New Hampshire and Dartmouth students turned out in strong numbers with many registering for the first time to vote in New Hampshire. Hanover noticed a marked uptick in same-day registration.

Rhode Island: Rhode Island rolled out e-poll books statewide for the first time this primary and overall things seemed to go well with the new check-in system. One Newport voter reported being unable to vote because his party affiliation had been switched by the state’s Division of Motor Vehicles. In Providence, one polling place opened about 20 minutes late because poll workers didn’t have the required passwords to access the voting system.

Research and Report Summaries

Research and Report Summaries are provided by Sean Greene. Greene has served as the director of research for the U.S. Election Assistance Commission and the Pew Center on the States Election Initiatives. He currently lives in Rome where he is studying Italian, drinking Moretti beer and still paying close attention to the administration of elections in the United States. He’s looking forward to casting his first ballot as a UOCAVA voter.

2016 Overseas Citizen Population Analysis Report, Federal Voting Assistance Program (FVAP), September 12, 2018: In its most recent biennial Overseas Citizen Population Analysis (OCPA), FVAP estimates there were three million U.S. citizens of voting age living abroad in 2016. Of these approximately 208,000, or 7 percent, cast ballots compared with a domestic turnout of 72 percent. The report attributes some of this gap in turnout to challenges faced by overseas voters such as speed of mail delivery.

Of the nearly three million voting age citizens living overseas it is estimated the most, more than 620,000, live in Canada, followed by nearly 320,000 in the United Kingdom, and approximately 200,000 in Mexico.

Securing the Vote: Protecting American Democracy, a Consensus Study Report of The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, September 2018: This report, written by a committee of experts from a variety of fields, recommends several actions federal, state, and local officials can take to improve election security including:

  • Elections should be conducted by human-readable paper ballots and voting machines that cannot be independently audited should no longer be used.
  • States should mandate risk-limiting audits.
  • Internet voting should not be used now and should only be used when there are guarantees of secrecy, security, and verifiability.
  • The integrity of voter registration databases should be routinely assessed.
  • Jurisdictions using electronic poll books should have a back-up plan in case the use of those systems is disrupted.
  • The designation of elections as critical infrastructure should continue.

Operations and Performance of Virginia’s Department of Elections, Joint Legislative Audit and Review Commission, Sept. 10, 2018: This report to the Governor and General Assembly of Virginia evaluated the operation and performance of the state Department of Elections. The findings include:

  • The state uses a fairly robust process to maintain its voter registration list but there is room for improvement.
  • The state’s IT system that maintains the voter registration list and interacts with local agencies is not sufficiently functional or reliable.
  • Department of Election oversight of local election administration does not fully assure election integrity and uniformity.
  • The department has lacked continuity of leadership and continues to be susceptible to political influence.
    More than 20 recommendations are provided to help make improvements in these areas.

Election News This Week

Vote-by-Mail News: Lots of vote-by-mail related news this week. In New Jersey, county clerks are expressing concerns that a change to the state’s vote-by-mail law may confuse voters. Under the law, voters who requested mail-in ballots for all future elections will continue to get them until they opt out. That’s a change from previous law that required officials to check in with mail-in voters to ask if they want to continue after the fourth general election since they signed up. Voters in Dawes County, South Dakota will be voting by mail moving forward. In Utah, Washington County has joined a growing number of Utah counties that rely solely on vote-by-mail. And in Los Angeles County, California, the registrar-recorder’s office has redesigned the ballot cards so they are easier to understand. “You actually fill in the oval right next to the name of the candidate or the response to the measure that you want to look at,” Dean Logan, L.A. County Registrar-Recorder/County Clerk, told ABC7. In L.A. County, 2.2 million registered voters receive their ballot by mail. LA County will also be providing return postage for all ballots.

While elections officials along the East Coast are doing what they can to prepare for Hurricane Florence, officials in Jefferson County, Arkansas are faced with inoperable voting equipment and extensive water damage to the Jefferson County Election Commission after the building was hit by flash flooding and ceiling leaks from heavy rains this weekend. While the weekend’s rains exacerbated the situation, the problems really began back in the spring from a hailstorm that damaged the building. “It’s very concerning to me that if we don’t have voting machines and a building to use — it’s devastating if we don’t have an election,” Michael Adam, chairman of the Jefferson County Election Commission to KATV.

This week, National Public Radio ran an interesting series of stories about why Americans don’t vote. While some of the series does focus on barriers to voting such as lack of early voting or ID laws, most of the series focuses on the psychology behind not voting.

This may be the geekiest of election geek things, be we think it sounds pretty cool. The Tennessee secretary of state’s office is hosting a workshop entitled “Glorious Victory: Election Records at the Tennessee State Library and Archives,” where a veteran genealogist will show how election records can help with genealogy. The Tennessee State Library and Archives has documents directly relating to local, state and national elections, along with military election records from the early 1800s. The office regularly refers to the 1891 Enumeration List as an alternate to the 1890 Tennessee census. “Tennessee has a rich history of civic involvement,” said Tre Hargett, secretary of state. “These historical election-related records speak to this history and serve to encourage all of us to redouble our own civic efforts and carry on the important legacy and example of good citizenship demonstrated by our ancestors.”

electionline is sending good thoughts for a speedy recovery to Montcalm County, Michigan Clerk Kristen Millard who is in serious condition at an area hospital after losing control of her motorcycle in a single-vehicle accident.

Personnel News: Libertarian Ginger Grider has announced her candidacy for New Mexico secretary of state. Dr. Amanda Lopez Askin has been selected as the new Dona Ana County, New Mexico clerk. Medford, Massachusetts City Clerk Ed Finn has stepped down after 20 years on the job. Thad Hall has joined the Richland County South Carolina board of voter registration and elections as deputy director.

In Memoriam: Dr. Glyde Marsh of New Albany, Ohio died on September 11th. He was two days shy of his 100th birthday. Marsh was a veteran of World War II and a pre-eminent poultry veterinarian. He was also Ohio’s oldest election official serving on the New Albany City Council since 1998. Marsh had served as a Franklin County poll worker since 1954. He worked every election but one when he was recovering from an accident and he had planned to work the upcoming general election in November. “You want to be able to complain about your government and you have no right to complain if you’re not voting,” Marsh told a local television station before his passing.

Legislative Updates

Federal Legislation: Rep. Bob Gibbs (R-Ohio) has introduced legislation that would require all potential voters to provide proof-of-citizenship when registering to vote. The proposed legislation would require that documentation like a valid U.S. passport, a certified birth certificate issued by a state, a consular report of birth abroad issued by the U.S. Secretary of State, or a naturalization certificate, or certificate of citizenship issued by the U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security be presented when one registers to vote.

Maine: Gov. Paul LePage has vetoed legislation that would provide funding to conduct the upcoming November election via ranked-choice voting.

Michigan: State elections officials have certified a ballot measure for the November 6 ballot that, if approved, would allow for same-day voter registration and no-excuse absentee voting.

New Jersey: Democrats have introduced a bill setting a requirement for how much in federal election security funds must be used for new voting machines, an amount that is nearly twice as much as what the governor’s administration is planning.

New York: State Sen. Elaine Phillips (R-Nassau County) has introduced legislation that would allow public schools to opt out of serving as polling places on Election Day. We need to let schools decide if opening their doors puts children at additional risk, and if more suitable sites should be found for Election Day voting,” Phillips told The New York Post.

Legal Updates

Arizona: The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals as has set an October 3 hearing to hear arguments in the legality of the state’s ballot harvesting ban.

In other 9th Circuit news, a three-judge panel has said the Democratic National Committee could not produce “a single voter” to testify that it was harder for them to vote because of the state’s ballot-harvesting law. The court also said that the state’s rule that eliminates ballots cast outside of a person’s assigned precinct does not impose a burden on voters and that it is outweighed by the state’s need to conduct orderly elections.

Florida: In a 27-page ruling, U.S. District Judge Mark Walker partially sided with plaintiffs in a federal lawsuit that sought have elections officials in 32 counties provide Spanish-language ballots. Walker ordered officials to provide sample ballots in Spanish, but did not go so far as to require bilingual ballots and poll workers. “Voting in a language you do not understand is like asking this court [to] decide the winner of the Nobel Prize for Chemistry — ineffective, in other words,” Walker wrote. “Courts have long held that the right to vote includes not only the right to physically enter a polling place and fill out a ballot but also the right to comprehend and understand what is on that ballot.”

Michigan: The U.S. Supreme Court turned down an appeal of a lower court ruling on Michigan’s straight-ticket voting mean voters will not be able to use a single mark to choose all the candidates from one party.

New Mexico: The New Mexico Supreme Court unanimously ruled in favor of a petition by the state Republican and Libertarian parties seeking to stop the implementation of straight-ticket voting.

North Carolina: According to The Outer Banks Voice, federal prosecutors and ICE officials have revised their subpoena for voting records in 44 counties in North Carolina. In their revised subpoena, prosecutors have given officials until January to comply with the subpoenas. The state Board of Elections voted to fight the subpoenas, regardless of the deadline.

Also in North Carolina, Buffy Christina Quinn, 39 has been indicted on a felony charge of violation of election law for voting in the 2016 while she was still on probation.

North Dakota: The state has asked the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to overturn a lower court’s ruling that found problems with how the state’s voter ID laws affect Native Americans. U.S. District Judge Daniel Hovland in April agreed to expand the proof of identity Native Americans can use for North Dakota elections. The judge also ordered eliminating a requirement that those documents include residential street addresses, which sometimes aren’t assigned on American Indian reservations. The state argues the required changes could lead to voter fraud.

Tech Thursday

Texas: An article in the Longview News-Journal details the steps Texas is slowly but surely taking toward online voter registration. Earlier this year, the state was ordered by a federal judge to allow voters to register online when they also use that method to renew driver’s licenses. While not yet available, partisans and elections officials are gearing up for its debut.

Opinions This Week

National Opinions: Nonvoters | Ranked choice voting | Election security | Voter suppression
Book Reviews: The Embattle Vote in America | One Person, No Vote
Alaska: Ranked choice voting | Election investigation
Arizona: Maricopa County, II
California: Automatic voter registration
Colorado: Election security
Florida: Poll workers | Ballot length | Write-in loophole
Guam: Voting system
Hawaii: Voting abuses
Illinois: Election security
Kentucky: Secretary of state
Massachusetts: Ranked-choice voting
Michigan: Straight-ticket voting | Elections ballot initiative
Minnesota: Election security | Tower City elections
New Jersey: Felon voting rights
New Mexico: Straight-ticket voting, II | Ranked choice voting | Election consolidation | Voter disenfranchisement
New York: Voting laws; Voter accessibility
North Carolina: Election system | Ballot subpoenas, II, III, IV, V
Oregon: Vote-by-mail, II
Pennsylvania: Young voters | Election security
Tennessee: Turnout, II
Texas: Voter registration
Utah: San Juan County
Virginia: Election process | Elections oversight
West Virginia: Election integrity | Rock the vote | Blockchain voting

Clearie Awards

EAC “Clearies” Honor Innovation, Leadership in Election Administration

By Brian Newby
EAC Executive Director

What’s your secret to a successful election that serves the needs of voters? The U.S. Election Assistance Commission (EAC) invites you to tell the commission about your work and enter it for consideration in the third annual national competition for best practices in election administration.

The EAC clearinghouse awards, dubbed the “Clearies” for short, offer a great stage to celebrate and share innovative programs cultivated by election offices. In meeting our Help America Vote Act (HAVA) charge to serve as an informational clearinghouse for election officials, the EAC is pleased to recognize the forward-looking and effective efforts of election officials across America. These accolades are just one way the commission can meet the promise of HAVA and further its clearinghouse efforts.

As we travel the country and meet with election officials, we see first-hand countless fresh and innovative election initiatives deployed throughout the nation. The EAC established these awards to acknowledge the hard work, determination, and “can-do” spirit that election officials bring to even the most detailed of Election Day tasks. The EAC hopes you’ll consider entering this year’s competition so that we can honor your efforts and promote your successes.

As we did last year, the EAC is seeking entries for three categories: 1) innovations in elections, 2) best practices related to the recruiting, training, and retaining of election workers, and 3) accessibility for voters with disabilities. The 2017 winners of the Clearie awards can be found here and the work of others who submitted entries last year has been featured in the EAC’s blog and other resources throughout the year.

To make this year’s competition even more meaningful, the EAC has made the decision to dedicate the 2018 Clearies in honor of the life and legacy of Wendy Noren and R. Brian Lewis. Wendy Noran served as Clerk of Boone County, Missouri for over three decades and was an active member of the EAC’s Board of Advisors before her passing. R. Brian Lewis served as Counsel to the office of the Senate Majority Leader and the Senate Rules and Administration Committee before his passing and was an early and steadfast proponent of HAVA and election officials. Both were leaders in the field of election administration who will long be remembered for their hard work, integrity, and friendship. Their work is a beacon for the kind of innovation and dedication the EAC honors through the Clearies.

The deadline for your Cleary submissions is Friday, October 5th. To foster participation from all corners of the elections community, we purposely keep the Clearies entry process simple and straightforward. Applications from all perspectives and types of jurisdictions are encouraged to submit their work. And since we recognize that this is a busy time of year, submissions can be as simple as a half-page narrative or as complex as a series of documents and multimedia. All entries will be evaluated on their merit and previously set criteria, which include:

  • Efficacy
  • Innovation
  • Sustainability
  • Outreach efforts
  • Cost-effectiveness
  • Replicability

Submissions should be sent by email to clearinghouse@eac.gov. While there is no set application, those applying should provide a brief summary of their program. They can also choose to attach any relevant documents, pictures, and links that support their submission. In the subject line, applicants should state which particular competition they are entering. If candidates have entries for more than one category, they should email them separately. Submissions should also include contact information for the person submitting the program for consideration.

We look forward to receiving your entries to this year’s Clearies. For more information about the competition, please contact Patrick Leahy at pleahy@eac.gov.

Upcoming Events

EAC Online Discussion about Voter Registration — The U.S. Election Assistance Commission (EAC) will host an online event on Wednesday, September 19 to discuss two pre-election dates that are important to elections officials and voters: September 22, the 45-day deadline for states to send absentee ballots to uniformed and overseas citizen voters; and September 25, National Voter Registration Day. The 11 a.m. Eastern Time event will be live-streamed on Facebook and the EAC’s website, www.eac.gov. Moderated by EAC Chairman Thomas Hicks, the discussion will feature David Beirne, Director of the Federal Voting Assistance Program, and Brian Miller, Executive Director of Nonprofit Vote, detailing their organizations’ activities to ensure voters know they have an opportunity to cast a ballot in the upcoming midterm elections. Where: Online. When: 11 a.m.; September 19.

IGO Post-Election Audits Webinar — There’s a lot of buzz around post-election audits and Risk-limiting audits (RLAs). This webinar will explain RLA terms and definitions, and will outline the key elements for conducting a RLA, including the use of technology. We’ll also discuss the benefits, challenges, and best practices, and what can be done to enhance a traditional post-election audit. Finally, we’ll learn about the post-election audit program that was recently implemented in Utah. Our presenters are Jennifer Morrell from the Democracy Fund’s Election Validation Project and Ryan Cowley, Election Director for Weber County, Utah. Where: Online: When: 4pm, September 19.

International Association of Government Officials — IGO’s 2019 mid-winter conference will be held in Irvine, California, January 6-11, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of State Election Directors — The NASED Winter Conference will be held in Washington DC, February 1-4, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of Secretaries of State — The NASS Winter Conference will be held in Washington, DC, February 1-4, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

International Association of Government Officials — IGO’s 2019 Annual Conference will be held in Houston, Texas, July 11-17. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of Counties — NACo’s 2019 Annual Conference will be held in Clark County (Las Vegas), Nevada July 11-15, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of State Election Directors — The NASED Summer Conference will be held in Austin, Texas, July 14-16, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

Job Postings This Week

electionlineWeekly publishes election administration job postings each week as a free service to our readers. To have your job listed in the newsletter, please send a copy of the job description, including a web link to mmoretti@electionline.org. Job postings must be received by 5pm on Wednesday in order to appear in the Thursday newsletter. Listings will run for three weeks or till the deadline listed in the posting.

Certification Manager (Denver, CO) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Certification Manager to join our team in Denver, CO! This position is a cross -functional leader playing a key role in managing certification efforts for Dominion Voting products. In this role, you will act as a representative of the company with State and Federal certification officials, test labs, and other key internal and external stakeholders throughout the certification process. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Customer Relations Manager (Phoenix, AZ) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Customer Relations Manager to join our team in Phoenix, AZ! This position will be responsible for effectively and proactively managing the day-to-day relationship, administration and technical/product support of one or more assigned customer accounts. Additionally, the CRM will serve as project manager for specialized projects such as pre- and postelection day support, new product implementations, and/or product upgrades/updates. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Program Manager, CIS— the Elections Program Manager is assigned to the Elections Infrastructure ISAC (EI-ISAC) at the Center for Internet Security. Reporting to the Director of the EI-ISAC, the Elections Program Manager will partner with other cybersecurity team members to promote the CIS mission and help support our growth. The primary purpose of this position is to serve as a subject matter expert on and represent the EI-ISAC in public forums regarding election infrastructure issues. The Elections Program Manager will work with the EI-ISAC Director to build relationships in the elections community and identify tools, products, and initiatives that meet the security needs of election officials. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Supervisor, Pinal County, Arizona— performs professional and administrative work in planning, organizing and directing strategic and daily goals and objectives, operations and activities of the Elections Department. Work is performed under the general administrative direction of the Elections Director. The employee is expected to exercise initiative, independent judgment and discretion. Salary: $49,647-$56,473. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Embedded System Software Engineer, Clear Ballot — Clear Ballot is looking for a talented Software Engineer who wants to bring their technical skills to bear on a hugely consequential problem. The successful candidate will build and enhance full software stack of highly available applications using primarily Python that interface with front-end web applications implemented in JavaScript and HTML5. The application software deploys on OEM based hardware, with optical scanner, battery backup, and full touchscreen UI, running a custom configured version of Linux OS. The ideal candidate should have strong technical skills, solid understanding of developing for embedded systems, a good working knowledge of the Linux architecture, and software integration with OEM hardware devices. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build and enhance a platform that is changing the elections industry. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Field Sales Director, Hart InterCivic — the Field Sales Director works primarily on the road and from a home office when he/she is not on business travel. The Field Sales Director is responsible for creating news sales with prospects and existing clients in a defined region. Today, this role is a single contributor and does not directly manage people. This position will report to the VP of Sales. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Full Stack Principal Software Engineer, Clear Ballot— Clear Ballot is looking for an accomplished Principal Software Engineer who wants to bring their technical and leadership skills to bear on a hugely consequential problem: Bringing transparency to democratic elections. The successful candidate will have the ability to look at the bigger picture and deal with complex and competing requirements to design effective solutions. Extensive knowledge of and experience with large data structures and algorithms will be key. The backend implemented in Python and uses a SQL data base. The front end is implemented in JavaScript, Node.js and HTML5. The ideal candidate should have strong technical and leadership skills and a good working knowledge of the latest concepts in security, performance, and resilience. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build and enhance a platform that is changing the elections industry. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Full Stack Software Developer, Clear Ballot— Clear Ballot is looking for a talented Software Engineer who wants to bring their technical skills to bear on a hugely consequential problem. The successful candidate will build and enhance enterprise-level, highly available applications using primarily Python and MySQL that interface with frontend web applications implemented in JavaScript, Node.js and HTML5. The ideal candidate should have strong technical skills and a good working knowledge of the latest concepts in performance, security and resilience. One of the hallmarks of our system is its emphasis on new visualization techniques made possible by sophisticated data structures that enable high-performance in a multi-user environment. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build and enhance a platform that is changing the elections industry. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Full-Stack Software Engineer, Clear Ballot — Clear Ballot is looking for a talented Software Engineer who wants to bring their technical skills to bear on a hugely consequential problem – to modernize America’s voting systems and to bring transparency to democratic elections. The successful candidate will build and enhance enterprise-level, highly available applications using primarily Python and MySQL that interface with frontend web applications implemented in JavaScript, Node.js and HTML5. The ideal candidate should have strong technical skills and a good working knowledge of the latest concepts in performance, security and resilience. One of the hallmarks of our system is its emphasis on new visualization techniques made possible by sophisticated data structures that enable high-performance in a multi-user environment. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build and enhance a platform that is changing the elections industry. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Inside Sales Representative, Runbeck — to support our desired growth and market expansion, we continue to hire outstanding talent in multiple departments. We are looking for highly motivated, dedicated and talented individuals who will be able to contribute significantly to the success of the company while receiving great opportunities for professional growth and financial benefits. Responsibilities include: Contact potential or existing customers to inform them about a product or service; ability to present solution and its value to a prospect over the phone; answer questions about products or the company; ask questions to understand customer requirements and close sales; enter and update customer information in the database; keep records of calls and sale and note useful information in the CRM; process orders in an accurate manner; and go the “extra mile” to meet sales quota and facilitate future sales. Application: In order to apply, please send a resume to Tammy White: twhite@runbeck.net.

Program Manager, Overseas Voting Initiative, Council of State Governments — the Program Manager of CSG’s Overseas Voting Initiative, funded through a cooperative agreement with the US Dept. of Defense (DOD) Federal Voting Assistance Program (FVAP), provides day-to-day management and oversight of the Initiative, including research and policy analysis of electronic absentee voting systems for military voters, and development and dissemination of educational policy programming and deliverables to state leaders in support of the cooperative agreement. The Program Manager works within CSG’s Center of Innovation and in cooperation with CSG’s policy and executive management teams as well as regional offices, affiliates and members to support, monitor and improve state elections processes for military and overseas voters. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Project Manager (Austin, TX) – Hart InterCivic — Hart InterCivic is looking for a project manager to work with our Professional Services Team. The project manager oversees the deployment of voting systems and training to both existing and new Hart customers. The ideal candidate has experience in the elections industry, is PMP certified, and is motivated to achieve success for our customers with initiative. Travel up to 80 percent. Reports to the Manager of Professional Services. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Project Manager (San Leandro, CA or Sacramento, CA) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking an experienced Project Manager to join our team in either San Leandro, CA or Sacramento, CA! This position will be responsible for the effective technical project management of assigned projects which includes but not limited to, business, functional, and risk analysis as well as implementation of new processes, equipment and systems. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Python Developer, Clear Ballot — Clear Ballot seeks a talented python developer in the Boston area to assume responsibility for an existing suite of python scripts to create files for use with ClearVote(TM) digital voting system. Job responsibilities: Maintain and enhance existing python scripts that read PDF formatted ballot styles and produce the files needed by ClearVote (TM) digital voting system to tabulate said ballot; Run existing python scripts to generate marked test ballots for use in testing ClearVote(TM); Develop and execute test plans to guarantee ClearVote tabulates marked ballots correctly; Expand PDF parsing capabilities as new customer’s ballot styles are introduced; Leverage analytics you gather to improve performance through script and/or hardware changes; Must perform these duties within aggressive timelines that often require working outside of normal business hours. Application: For the complete listing and to apply, click here.

Senior Level Software Developer, BPro — We are a well-established small business that has been developing requirements and producing software for the needs of state governments since 1985 and continue to maintain and upgrade many of those systems. We have offices in Pierre, South Dakota, Fargo, North Dakota, Minnesota & Virginia. We’re currently looking for an energetic and intelligent .Net Developer to join our growing team. Our ideal candidate is one who loves to learn, enjoys working as a team, and who can multitask and meet deadlines. Skills required: .NET, VB, VBA, ASP, SQL, HTML, and JavaScript. A four-year college degree is the minimum educational requirement. All applicants must have excellent written and verbal communications skills. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Senior Software Developer, Runbeck— Runbeck Election Services is looking for full stack enthusiasts who are comfortable tackling end-to-end and enjoy building products that solve big problems and delight customers. We’re a collaborative team who knows how to get things done (Lone Rangers need not apply). We believe that small teams focused on shipping software move the fastest and make the most impact. The ideal candidate for this position has extensive back end skills (C#, MVC, ASP.Net, SQL Server) paired with solid web and desktop skills (IIS, JavaScript, HTML 5, CSS, jQuery, WPF, Win Forms). Must have a solid grasp of our basic toolset (Jira, Visual Studio). Willing to learn new plug-ins and IDE enhancements in order to boost your productivity and are excited to introduce us to new tooling experiences that have worked for you in the past. You bring discipline and care about implementation practices. You are familiar with Agile/Scrum processes, practice common design patterns, embrace clean coding principles, and employ many other techniques in an effort to bring a high level of software craftsmanship to your finished product. Application: In order to apply, please send a resume to Tammy White: twhite@runbeck.net.

Software Developer II (Toronto, ON) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking an experienced Software Developer to join our team in Toronto! This position will be responsible for providing high-level technical expertise to the design, development, coding, testing and debugging of new software products and/or significant enhancements to existing software products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Software Product Specialist II (Denver, CO) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Software Product Specialist II to join our team in Denver, Colorado! This position will be responsible for delivering a wide variety of technical and non-technical customer support services related to the implementation, operation, repair, maintenance and upgrades of Dominion Voting Systems technology products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Software Product Specialist II (Reno, NV) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Software Product Specialist II to join our team in Reno, NV! This position will be responsible for delivering a wide variety of technical and non-technical customer support services related to the implementation, operation, repair, maintenance and upgrades of Dominion Voting Systems technology products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Software Product Specialist II (Phoenix, AZ) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Software Product Specialist II to join our team in Phoenix, AZ! This position will be responsible for delivering a wide variety of technical and non-technical customer support services related to the implementation, operation, repair, maintenance and upgrades of Dominion Voting Systems technology products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Software Product Specialist II (San Leandro, CA) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Software Product Specialist II to join our team in San Leandro, CA! This position will be responsible for delivering a wide variety of technical and non-technical customer support services related to the implementation, operation, repair, maintenance and upgrades of Dominion Voting Systems technology products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Systems Engineer, Clear Ballot — We are looking for a talented Systems Engineer who has both a technical and services/support background which enables them to quickly assess customer needs and offer value to Clear Ballot’s customers. The Systems Engineer will gain a deep understanding of how Clear Ballot’s products operate and their optimal configuration to build a streamlined installation process of the Clear Vote election system. The ideal candidate for this position can prioritize mission critical tasks and coordinate the implementation and expansion of our systems. They will be able to work directly with customers, display innovation, think conceptually and act tactically to build consensus around system installation and enhancement and meet deadlines. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

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Each aluminum briefcase contains the following: aluminum legs, privacy shield, writing base, light assembly. All units are in great shape dimensions are 22”x 18”x 3“. MFG: ESL. Election supplies Limited, Napa California. Quantity: 400 Price per unit is $50. Contact Greg Larson 408.569.1004

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In Focus This Week

September 3, 2018

September 3, 2018

In Focus This Week

Access denied
Keeping voter sites secure while still keeping them accessible

By M. Mindy Moretti
electionline.org

Recently some Georgia voters living overseas attempted to access the state’s online voter registration database only to find that their access was denied.

Instead of access to the state’s online voter registration portal, overseas voters found an access denied warning along with contact information for assistance.

In an effort to secure the state’s website and OVR database, the Georgia secretary of state’s office made the choice to block international IPs from accessing the voter registration portal on their website.

According to a spokeswoman for the secretary of state’s office, the portal will be open from Sept. 18 to Election Day.

“I have a lot of sympathy for the states on these issues because they are caught between wanting to make an increasing number of online services freely available to voters and an exponential escalation in threats,” Susan Dzieduszycka-Suinat of the US Vote Foundation and Overseas Vote Foundation. “Not too long ago, this was being done without problems like what they face now. The attacks from hostile foreign powers are very real. These attacks are very real and bots can bog down these open services with SPAM just so many times before a state will want to put barriers up.”

However, Dzieduszycka-Suinat cautioned that blocking foreign IP addresses and locking overseas voters out of their services is the wrong kind of barrier.

“It won’t really do anything to dissuade a hacker. It will only turn away real voters. A hacker, or even a determined voter, will just get onto a VPN and to a US IP address, and guess what? They’re in,” Dzieduszycka-Suinat said.

The Federal Voting Assistance Program said that they reached out the Georgia secretary of state’s office for a better understanding of what was happening, but information appearing on social media is what concerned FVAP most rather than individual state policies.

“We are aware of reports that other states may also be limiting access to their websites from foreign-based IP addresses so we will continue to monitor social media. We are actively working to encourage states to leverage us as a key resource for access in light of any new cyber security protocols,” said FVAP Director David Beirne. “What will be especially interesting is to see if the impact of a whitelisting cybersecurity policy, or special access for known entities, will affect the ability of military and overseas voters to retrieve their electronic blank ballots — or if the impact is limited to online voter registration systems.”

The US Vote Foundation and Overseas Vote Foundation as well as FVAP portals remain open to overseas IPs. According to Beirne, FVAP leverages a content delivery network which provides duplicate web servers for U.S. and worldwide distribution to offset internet latency in other countries. FVAP also maintains a web application firewall to dynamically mitigate intrusion attempts.

We reached out to some of the states with the highest percentages of members of the armed services, and that offer online voter registration and the response was mixed.

Virginia Elections Commissioner Christopher Piper said that the commonwealth does not comment on specific election security protocols, however, quick check by a friend overseas, living in one of the former Soviet republics, found that Virginia’s online voter registration portal remains accessible to overseas IP addresses.

According to Hillary Rudy with the Colorado secretary of state’s office, most international IPs have access to Colorado’s online voter registration site. Colorado does have network blocks in place on some nations due to a high volume of attacks coming from the region. The Colorado Department of State also blocks IP addresses attempting to attack its systems, no matter the source of the traffic, until the attack stops.

Whitelisting and Blacklisting
One way that states can secure their sites—and some are already employing—is whitelisting and blacklisting.

According to FedTech, the use of blacklisting as a form of cybersecurity protection is common, but it requires ­security ­personnel to keep a permanent eye out for any ­malware they want to block from an agency’s IT ­environment. Whitelisting lets IT teams grant advance permission for specific, trusted items (such as applications or URLs) to run on the network, instead of blocking access to previously identified risks and threats.

Colorado employs both.

“We use whitelisting based on known users as well as blacklisting of known malicious IPs. Whitelisting and blacklisting is done both by in-house staff and through threat intelligence platforms,” Rudy explained. “The cost to a jurisdiction of using automated threat sharing feeds is dependent not only on the cost of the feed itself (in our case, approximately $10,000 annually), but also based on the ability of technical infrastructure to ingest or consume those feeds and apply them automatically.”

Beirne from FVAP said that whitelisting versus blacklisting isn’t an either/or proposition and that FVAP would also offer that neither is a single solution to cybersecurity, but both operate as part of a comprehensive approach. Whitelisting conveys a sense of limiting access which is accurate for more sensitive areas of a website.  Blacklisting is a recognition of known bad actors or those of a particular reputation.

Beirne said it’s important to recognize the need for an audit of traffic prior to whatever form of security it implemented.

“There is no doubt that whitelisting holds value, but the relative benefit needs to be weighed against the relative cost of limiting access,” Beirne said. “For example, an audit of web traffic historically can help identify the need for blacklisting against known bad actors and only whitelist those portions of a website that require a deeper level of privileged access to some portion of a system on the backend.”

 

Federal-State Updates

According to Common Cause all sensitive voter registration information gathered by the now-defunct Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity has been destroyed in accordance to an agreement between the Administration and Common Cause.

“President Trump’s now-disbanded voter fraud Commission was flawed from the start,” Paul Seamus Ryan, vice president for policy and litigation of Common Cause, said in a statement. “Common Cause and its 1.2 million members celebrate the end of this litigation and the destruction of the commission’s illegally collected voter data.”

 

Primary Updates

Arizona: Fallout from the September 4 primary in Maricopa County continued this week. A report from the Arizona Republic noted that some voters were denied the right to vote because they presented tribal IDs, although those IDs are acceptable under Arizona law. Analysis has shown that the delayed openings in Maricopa County affected 95 precincts and as many as 270,000 voters. On Tuesday, Maricopa County Recorder Adrian Fontes posted a video to Facebook Live apologizing for the problems. The county has approved $200,000 to audit the election.

Massachusetts: Turn-out on Massachusetts post-Labor Day primary was higher than expected, but the higher turnout did not seem to impact operations, which, for the most part, were smooth in the commonwealth. With only a few dozens votes separating candidates in a Democratic primary for a U.S. House seat, the secretary of state’s office ordered all ballots impounded in anticipation of a recount. In Lowell, about 100 votes cast at one polling place were not included in the unofficial election totals. Human error resulted in the wrong reporting of results from Fitchburg City. In Newton, heat caused some issues for poll workers, including machine malfunctions.

Election News This Week

The U.S Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of North Carolina has subpoenaed voter records from the state board of elections and 44 counties. The SBOE, the subpoena came at the request of Immigration and Customs Enforcement. According to the News & Observer, among the state records from Jan. 1, 2010 through Aug. 30, 2018 that were requested: all voter registration applications, federal write-in absentee ballots, federal post card applications, early-voting application forms, provisional voting forms, absentee ballot request forms, all “admission or denial of non-citizen return forms,” and all voter registration cancellation or revocation forms. The request includes executed official ballots, including vote-by-mail and early ballots that are traceable to the voters who cast them. One local election official told the Outer Banks News that the request would be “devastating” to preparations for the midterms.

Elections officials in Hawaii do just about everything they can to get residents registered to vote. They set up booths at festivals and on college campuses and send staff to the monthly naturalization ceremonies with registration forms in hand. But, according to an article in the Honolulu Civil Beat, the one thing you won’t hear the officials tell anyone is to actually go vote. “It’s not on us. We can’t send out the message to go vote,” elections office spokeswoman Nedielyn Bueno told the Civil Beat. “It’s important for folks to know how to do it, it’s up to the individual to know, ‘I’m ready to vote.’” Bueno also noted that it’s not possible for the state to use federal funds to promote voting and that the office has unsuccessfully requested state funds in the past to boost its voter education efforts

Sometimes, you just have to spend some money. This week the Cerro Gordo, Iowa auditor’s office announced that it would spend $4,425 to retain RBM Election Support Services through the general election in November. The company will troubleshoot issues during ballot processing, assisting poll workers, result posting, post-election processing, and assisting with equipment that processes ballots. “It’s a good use of taxpayer dollars to make sure our elections are good and clean elections. It’s imperative to democracy,” Mark Suby of Mason City told KIMT.

Personnel News: Ed Finn is retiring from his job as the Medford, Massachusetts clerk after 20-years on the job. Ronnie Metsker has been reappointed as the Johnson County, Kansas elections commissioner. Brazos County, Texas Elections Administrator Trudy Hancock has completed her CERA certification program. Jordan Esten is the new Chief Executive Officer for Clear Ballot. Esten was previously Clear Ballots chief operating officer.

In Memoriam: Former Linn County Clerk Del Riley died on August 23. He was 93. Riley was known as the “father of vote-by-mail” in Oregon elections. “His leadership, practices and policies are still in place today, 30 years after leaving office,” Roger Nyquist, Linn County Board of Commissioners chairman told the Albany Democrat-Herald. “The standard that Del set in Linn County government will be in place for a long time.” Current Linn County Clerk Steve Druckenmiller told the paper Riley’s pursuit of a vote-by-mail system for Oregon “changed the way elections are held in a profound way. He took a lot of ridicule, but was a visionary and changed the face of elections in Oregon, Washington, Colorado, many counties in Utah and California. This movement is growing nationally and that is thanks to Del.” He ran for the Linn County Clerk’s position in November 1966, was elected and took office in January 1967. He held the position for 18 years.

 

Legislative Updates

Colorado: The Golden City Council has referred a measure to the November ballot that would give 16-year-olds the right to vote in local elections on issues and candidates. If approved, Golden would become the first locality in Colorado to extend voting rights to those under 18.

Ohio: Akron has gathered enough signatures to allow voters to decide in November whether or not the city’s primary election should be moved from September to May. Because moving the election is a charter issue, it must be approved by voters.

Pennsylvania: Erie City Councilwoman Kathy Schaaf has introduced a resolution to proclaim September 25 as Voter Registration Day in Erie. “We are living in a very crucial time in our history, and we need more people to realize the power that they have in their vote,” Schaaf told WFXP.

Legal Updates

Arizona: The State of Arizona has reached an agreement with several groups including Mi Familia Vota, Promise Arizona and the League of Women Voters of Arizona who had threatened to sue over about 300,000 potential voters who weren’t offered a required chance to register to vote when they contacted the state’s Department of Economic Security or the Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System. Affected voters will get a bilingual letter explaining that they should have been offered the chance to register to vote.

Florida: U.S. District Court Judge Mark walker heard arguments this week over whether or not 32 Florida counties should provide bilingual ballots for the November elections. The suit was brought by Mi Familia and other organizations on behalf of the influx of Puerto Rican voters the state has seen since Hurricane Maria. A coalition of counties argued before Walker that there simply is not time to provide the ballots in Spanish. Although he did not rule, according to WCTV, Walker seemed to agree with the supervisors of electiosn.

Illinois: McLean County Circuit Judge Paul Lawrence has ruled that a referendum to disband the Bloomington Election Commission should proceed after he found 1,187 petition signatures were valid. The referendum needed 1,000 signatures to make the ballot.

Kansas: The Kansas Supreme Court has ordered Douglas County to summon a citizen-initiated grand jury to investigate allegations that Secretary of State Kris Kobach’s office mishandled voter registration forms during the 2016 election. According to the Lawrence Journal-World, In a one-page order signed by Chief Justice Lawton Nuss, the court denied Kobach’s request to review a Kansas Court of Appeals decision in June that said Lawrence resident Steven Davis had met the legal requirement for circulating petitions to summon a grand jury. The Supreme Court did not provide any further explanation of its decision.

Michigan: College Democrats from the University of Michigan and Michigan State University have filed suit against Secretary of State Ruth Johnson alleging that state voting laws discriminate against younger voters. According to the Detroit Free Press, the suit asks a federal judge to declare unconstitutional a state law that requires a voter’s residence for voter registration purposes to match the address on the voter’s driver’s license.

Also in Michigan, the U.S. 6th Circuit Court of Appeals, in a 2-1 decision has blocked a lower court ruling that would have struck down the state’s 2016 law banning straight-ticket voting. The appeals court said “there are very serious problems with both the factual underpinnings and the legal analysis” of the lower court’s opinion.

New Mexico: The New Mexico Republican and Libertarian parties, along with two outside political groups and a Democratic write-in candidate, filed a petition with the state Supreme Court late Thursday seeking to bar the straight-party voting option for the Nov. 6 election.

Texas: Crystal Mason, 43 of Tarrant County has been ordered to spend 10 months in jail followed by 26 months of supervised release after she illegally cast a ballot in the 2016 election while still on parole for another charge.

U.S. Virgin Islands: The U.S. Solicitor General Noel Francisco has filed paperwork with the U.S. Supreme Court rejecting any responsibility of the federal government for a law preventing some territorial residents from voting absentee in federal elections.

 

Tech Thursday

California: This week the California Department of Motor Vehicles announced that it sent the secretary of state’s office 23,000 erroneous voter registration records. According to the Sacramento Bee, the DMV said the errors stem from technicians toggling between multiple screens and registration information being improperly merged. According to the agency, 1,600 residents did not complete a voter registration affidavit and had their information sent to the secretary of state, which maintains the state’s list of registered voters.  In some cases, people were registered in the wrong party. Some customers who wished to opt out of the program were added. The department said the inaccurate customer information largely affected “voter preferences such as, vote-by-mail options, language and political party selections.”

Louisiana: A second company (Hart InterCivic) that lost a bid to provide new voting machines to the state of Louisiana has sent a letter to the Office of State Procurement supporting a letter sent by another losing bidder. According to The Associated Press, Hart’s letter said the evaluation was “flawed and lacked the fundamental transparency that Louisiana voters deserve.”

Oklahoma: Things are about to get a bit easier for Sooners who wish to update their voter information without leaving home. Next week the Oklahoma State Election Board will roll out a new online form that current voters can use to update their information. Election Board Secretary Paul Ziriax told The Oklahoman it’s a good first step toward implementation of the state’s online voter registration system, which is still years away. “We have been testing this significantly over the past few weeks. We also had the (Oklahoma) Cyber Command test this for security, and it passed muster with them last week,” Ziriax said during a meeting of the board on Tuesday according to the paper. “We’ve been wanting online voter registration for a long time. While this is not full-blown online voter registration, it’s still a big step forward in modernizing elections in Oklahoma and I’m very happy to be moving forward with it.”

Rhode Island: As a result of what’s being called an IT snafu with the state’s Division of Motor Vehicles’ automatic voter registration system, the new and updated voter registration records of at least 5,000 people were not processed. According to the Providence Journal, there was an issue with “missing fields” in the program that transfers the information from the DMV to the secretary of state’s office. Secretary of State Nellie Gorbea asked the state board of elections to include those voters on the rolls for next week’s primary.

 

Opinions This Week

National Opinions: Secure Elections Act

Alaska: Voting irregularities | Election integrity

Arizona: Maricopa County

Arkansas: Madison County

Florida: Turnout | Early voting | Ballot length

Georgia: Secretary of state race | Election lawsuit | Overseas voters

Indiana: Student voting

Kansas: Conflict of interest | Voting laws | Johnson County

Kentucky: Secretary of state, II

Massachusetts: Secretary of state race, II | Election security | Ranked choice voting, II

Mississippi: Voting rights

New Mexico: Straight-ticket voting, II, III

North Carolina: Voter ID | Ballot soap opera | Amendments

Oregon: Election security legislation

Pennsylvania: Election security | Voter registration, II | Voting machines

Tennessee: Turnout

Texas: Election security

West Virginia: Election protection

Wisconsin: Automatic voter registration

 

Upcoming Events

EAC Online Discussion about Voter Registration — The U.S. Election Assistance Commission (EAC) will host an online event on Wednesday, September 19 to discuss two pre-election dates that are important to elections officials and voters: September 22, the 45-day deadline for states to send absentee ballots to uniformed and overseas citizen voters; and September 25, National Voter Registration Day. The 11 a.m. Eastern Time event will be live-streamed on Facebook and the EAC’s website, www.eac.gov. Moderated by EAC Chairman Thomas Hicks, the discussion will feature David Beirne, Director of the Federal Voting Assistance Program, and Brian Miller, Executive Director of Nonprofit Vote, detailing their organizations’ activities to ensure voters know they have an opportunity to cast a ballot in the upcoming midterm elections. Where: Online. When: 11 a.m.; September 19.

International Association of Government Officials — IGO’s 2019 mid-winter conference will be held in Irvine, California, January 6-11, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of State Election Directors — The NASED Winter Conference will be held in Washington DC, February 1-4, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of Secretaries of State — The NASS Winter Conference will be held in Washington, DC, February 1-4, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

International Association of Government Officials — IGO’s 2019 Annual Conference will be held in Houston, Texas, July 11-17. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of Counties — NACo’s 2019 Annual Conference will be held in Clark County (Las Vegas), Nevada July 11-15, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of State Election Directors — The NASED Summer Conference will be held in Austin, Texas, July 14-16, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

 

Job Postings This Week

electionlineWeekly publishes election administration job postings each week as a free service to our readers. To have your job listed in the newsletter, please send a copy of the job description, including a web link to mmoretti@electionline.org.  Job postings must be received by 5pm on Wednesday in order to appear in the Thursday newsletter. Listings will run for three weeks or till the deadline listed in the posting.

Certification Manager (Denver, CO) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Certification Manager to join our team in Denver, CO! This position is a cross -functional leader playing a key role in managing certification efforts for Dominion Voting products. In this role, you will act as a representative of the company with State and Federal certification officials, test labs, and other key internal and external stakeholders throughout the certification process. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Customer Relations Manager (Phoenix, AZ) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Customer Relations Manager to join our team in Phoenix, AZ! This position will be responsible for effectively and proactively managing the day-to-day relationship, administration and technical/product support of one or more assigned customer accounts. Additionally, the CRM will serve as project manager for specialized projects such as pre- and postelection day support, new product implementations, and/or product upgrades/updates. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Election Security Lead, Wisconsin Elections Commission — the Wisconsin Elections Commission (WEC) develops and maintains several significant IT applications to assist in the administration of Wisconsin elections, including the statewide voter registration system known as WisVote, the Canvass Reporting System, and electronic poll book software known as Badger Book, as well as public websites such as MyVote Wisconsin and BADGER Voters.  Protecting the security of these applications is crucial to ensuring accurate elections and maintaining public confidence in the integrity of Wisconsin elections. This position serves as the point person for developing and implementing the agency’s overall elections security plan. It is responsible for ensuring the implementation of cyber security best practices in the Commission’s technical applications including WisVote.  This position will research and maintain the agency’s knowledge base regarding cybersecurity infrastructure, resources and practice. This position will also liaise with other State agencies and Federal entities regarding potential cyber threats against the Commission’s applications. Salary: $51,398-$80,621. Deadline: Open until filled. Application. For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Program Manager, CIS— the Elections Program Manager is assigned to the Elections Infrastructure ISAC (EI-ISAC) at the Center for Internet Security. Reporting to the Director of the EI-ISAC, the Elections Program Manager will partner with other cybersecurity team members to promote the CIS mission and help support our growth. The primary purpose of this position is to serve as a subject matter expert on and represent the EI-ISAC in public forums regarding election infrastructure issues. The Elections Program Manager will work with the EI-ISAC Director to build relationships in the elections community and identify tools, products, and initiatives that meet the security needs of election officials. Application:For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Supervisor, Pinal County, Arizona— performs professional and administrative work in planning, organizing and directing strategic and daily goals and objectives, operations and activities of the Elections Department. Work is performed under the general administrative direction of the Elections Director. The employee is expected to exercise initiative, independent judgment and discretion. Salary: $49,647-$56,473. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Embedded System Software Engineer, Clear Ballot — Clear Ballot is looking for a talented Software Engineer who wants to bring their technical skills to bear on a hugely consequential problem. The successful candidate will build and enhance full software stack of highly available applications using primarily Python that interface with front-end web applications implemented in JavaScript and HTML5.  The application software deploys on OEM based hardware, with optical scanner, battery backup, and full touchscreen UI, running a custom configured version of Linux OS. The ideal candidate should have strong technical skills, solid understanding of developing for embedded systems, a good working knowledge of the Linux architecture, and software integration with OEM hardware devices. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build and enhance a platform that is changing the elections industry. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Field Sales Director, Hart InterCivic — the Field Sales Director works primarily on the road and from a home office when he/she is not on business travel. The Field Sales Director is responsible for creating news sales with prospects and existing clients in a defined region. Today, this role is a single contributor and does not directly manage people.   This position will report to the VP of Sales. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Full Stack Principal Software Engineer, Clear Ballot— Clear Ballot is looking for an accomplished Principal Software Engineer who wants to bring their technical and leadership skills to bear on a hugely consequential problem: Bringing transparency to democratic elections.  The successful candidate will have the ability to look at the bigger picture and deal with complex and competing requirements to design effective solutions. Extensive knowledge of and experience with large data structures and algorithms will be key.  The backend implemented in Python and uses a SQL data base. The front end is implemented in JavaScript, Node.js and HTML5. The ideal candidate should have strong technical and leadership skills and a good working knowledge of the latest concepts in security, performance, and resilience. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build and enhance a platform that is changing the elections industry. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Full Stack Software Developer, Clear Ballot— Clear Ballot is looking for a talented Software Engineer who wants to bring their technical skills to bear on a hugely consequential problem. The successful candidate will build and enhance enterprise-level, highly available applications using primarily Python and MySQL that interface with frontend web applications implemented in JavaScript, Node.js and HTML5.  The ideal candidate should have strong technical skills and a good working knowledge of the latest concepts in performance, security and resilience. One of the hallmarks of our system is its emphasis on new visualization techniques made possible by sophisticated data structures that enable high-performance in a multi-user environment. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build and enhance a platform that is changing the elections industry. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Full-Stack Software Engineer, Clear Ballot — Clear Ballot is looking for a talented Software Engineer who wants to bring their technical skills to bear on a hugely consequential problem – to modernize America’s voting systems and to bring transparency to democratic elections.  The successful candidate will build and enhance enterprise-level, highly available applications using primarily Python and MySQL that interface with frontend web applications implemented in JavaScript, Node.js and HTML5. The ideal candidate should have strong technical skills and a good working knowledge of the latest concepts in performance, security and resilience. One of the hallmarks of our system is its emphasis on new visualization techniques made possible by sophisticated data structures that enable high-performance in a multi-user environment. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build and enhance a platform that is changing the elections industry. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Inside Sales Representative, Runbeck — to support our desired growth and market expansion, we continue to hire outstanding talent in multiple departments. We are looking for highly motivated, dedicated and talented individuals who will be able to contribute significantly to the success of the company while receiving great opportunities for professional growth and financial benefits. Responsibilities include: Contact potential or existing customers to inform them about a product or service; ability to present solution and its value to a prospect over the phone; answer questions about products or the company; ask questions to understand customer requirements and close sales; enter and update customer information in the database; keep records of calls and sale and note useful information in the CRM; process orders in an accurate manner; and go the “extra mile” to meet sales quota and facilitate future sales. Application: In order to apply, please send a resume to Tammy White: twhite@runbeck.net.

Program Manager, Overseas Voting Initiative, Council of State Governments — the Program Manager of CSG’s Overseas Voting Initiative, funded through a cooperative agreement with the US Dept. of Defense (DOD) Federal Voting Assistance Program (FVAP), provides day-to-day management and oversight of the Initiative, including research and policy analysis of electronic absentee voting systems for military voters, and development and dissemination of educational policy programming and deliverables to state leaders in support of the cooperative agreement. The Program Manager works within CSG’s Center of Innovation and in cooperation with CSG’s policy and executive management teams as well as regional offices, affiliates and members to support, monitor and improve state elections processes for military and overseas voters. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Project Manager (Austin, TX) – Hart InterCivic — Hart InterCivic is looking for a project manager to work with our Professional Services Team.  The project manager oversees the deployment of voting systems and training to both existing and new Hart customers. The ideal candidate has experience in the elections industry, is PMP certified, and is motivated to achieve success for our customers with initiative.  Travel up to 80 percent. Reports to the Manager of Professional Services. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Project Manager (San Leandro, CA or Sacramento, CA) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking an experienced Project Manager to join our team in either San Leandro, CA or Sacramento, CA! This position will be responsible for the effective technical project management of assigned projects which includes but not limited to, business, functional, and risk analysis as well as implementation of new processes, equipment and systems. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Python Developer, Clear Ballot — Clear Ballot seeks a talented python developer in the Boston area to assume responsibility for an existing suite of python scripts to create files for use with ClearVote(TM) digital voting system. Job responsibilities: Maintain and enhance existing python scripts that read PDF formatted ballot styles and produce the files needed by ClearVote (TM) digital voting system to tabulate said ballot; Run existing python scripts to generate marked test ballots for use in testing ClearVote(TM); Develop and execute test plans to guarantee ClearVote tabulates marked ballots correctly; Expand PDF parsing capabilities as new customer’s ballot styles are introduced; Leverage analytics you gather to improve performance through script and/or hardware changes; Must perform these duties within aggressive timelines that often require working outside of normal business hours. Application: For the complete listing and to apply, click here.

Senior Level Software Developer, BPro — We are a well-established small business that has been developing requirements and producing software for the needs of state governments since 1985 and continue to maintain and upgrade many of those systems. We have offices in Pierre, South Dakota, Fargo, North Dakota, Minnesota & Virginia. We’re currently looking for an energetic and intelligent .Net Developer to join our growing team. Our ideal candidate is one who loves to learn, enjoys working as a team, and who can multitask and meet deadlines. Skills required: .NET, VB, VBA, ASP, SQL, HTML, and JavaScript. A four-year college degree is the minimum educational requirement. All applicants must have excellent written and verbal communications skills. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Senior Software Developer, Runbeck— Runbeck Election Services is looking for full stack enthusiasts who are comfortable tackling end-to-end and enjoy building products that solve big problems and delight customers. We’re a collaborative team who knows how to get things done (Lone Rangers need not apply). We believe that small teams focused on shipping software move the fastest and make the most impact. The ideal candidate for this position has extensive back end skills (C#, MVC, ASP.Net, SQL Server) paired with solid web and desktop skills (IIS, JavaScript, HTML 5, CSS, jQuery, WPF, Win Forms). Must have a solid grasp of our basic toolset (Jira, Visual Studio). Willing to learn new plug-ins and IDE enhancements in order to boost your productivity and are excited to introduce us to new tooling experiences that have worked for you in the past. You bring discipline and care about implementation practices. You are familiar with Agile/Scrum processes, practice common design patterns, embrace clean coding principles, and employ many other techniques in an effort to bring a high level of software craftsmanship to your finished product. Application: In order to apply, please send a resume to Tammy White: twhite@runbeck.net.

Software Developer II (Toronto, ON) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking an experienced Software Developer to join our team in Toronto! This position will be responsible for providing high-level technical expertise to the design, development, coding, testing and debugging of new software products and/or significant enhancements to existing software products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Software Product Specialist II (Denver, CO) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Software Product Specialist II to join our team in Denver, Colorado! This position will be responsible for delivering a wide variety of technical and non-technical customer support services related to the implementation, operation, repair, maintenance and upgrades of Dominion Voting Systems technology products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Software Product Specialist II (Reno, NV) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Software Product Specialist II to join our team in Reno, NV! This position will be responsible for delivering a wide variety of technical and non-technical customer support services related to the implementation, operation, repair, maintenance and upgrades of Dominion Voting Systems technology products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Software Product Specialist II (Phoenix, AZ) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Software Product Specialist II to join our team in Phoenix, AZ! This position will be responsible for delivering a wide variety of technical and non-technical customer support services related to the implementation, operation, repair, maintenance and upgrades of Dominion Voting Systems technology products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Software Product Specialist II (San Leandro, CA) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Software Product Specialist II to join our team in San Leandro, CA! This position will be responsible for delivering a wide variety of technical and non-technical customer support services related to the implementation, operation, repair, maintenance and upgrades of Dominion Voting Systems technology products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Systems Engineer, Clear Ballot — We are looking for a talented Systems Engineer who has both a technical and services/support background which enables them to quickly assess customer needs and offer value to Clear Ballot’s customers. The Systems Engineer will gain a deep understanding of how Clear Ballot’s products operate and their optimal configuration to build a streamlined installation process of the Clear Vote election system. The ideal candidate for this position can prioritize mission critical tasks and coordinate the implementation and expansion of our systems. They will be able to work directly with customers, display innovation, think conceptually and act tactically to build consensus around system installation and enhancement and meet deadlines. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

 

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