electionline Weekly

November 15, 2018

November 15, 2018

In Focus This Week

Election 2018
A state-by-state look at the 2018 midterms

By M. Mindy Moretti
electionline.org

(Editor’s Note: Due to the Thanksgiving holiday, electionline Weekly will not publish next Thursday the 22nd and the Daily News will not publish on Thursday the 22nd and Friday the 23rd. We hope you have a very happy (and peaceful!) Thanksgiving and we sincerely hope that the hardworking elections officials, staff and volunteers can take a break, even if just for a day.)

As we noted last week, Election Day 2018 saw a series of issues, but for the most part it was relatively business as usual, even with the high turnout and the counting and recounting drama that has ensued in small number of states.

Elections officials see it all including an egg smashed between absentee ballots in Anoka County, Minnesota. Thanks to Paul Linnell for sending this in!

There were long lines. There were machine malfunctions. There were power outages. Some people weren’t able to cast their ballots. There were puppies, goats and a chicken. In other words, in most states, it was a fairly typical Election Day, even though turnout was fairly atypical for a midterm in most states.

Last week we took a broad view of how things went and this week we’ll take a closer look at how Election Day 2018 went in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

There is still a lot more to cover from the election that was and we’ll do that throughout the remainder of 2018 and into 2019.

And as well all know some counties and states are still counting and recounting ballots.

But for now, here’s a state-by-state look at the election. And don’t forget to check out our Election Day Dispatches for all the news from November 6.

Alabama —The Yellowhammer State rolled out electronic pollbooks more broadly this election and from all reports, things seemed to go well. While the e-poll book roll out went well, that doesn’t mean the day was without problems. In Montgomery County, some voters received incorrect ballots, some polling places opened late and some ran out of provisional ballots and change-of address forms. Madison County voting machines had problems tabulating ballots. Incumbent Secretary of State John Merrill was elected to a second term.

Alaska — The biggest news out of the biggest state was probably about how awesome the state’s early voting “I Voted” stickers were, but there was some other news. Early morning voters at one Anchorage polling place were without paper ballots after an election worker left them at home. Voting machine problems delayed the results in some areas of Southeast.

Arizona —Election Day in Arizona was vastly different than primary day. Although there were still some issues that arose, overall things went well. In Maricopa County, one polling place failed to open on time because the building had been foreclosed on overnight, and there were some issues with lines, but overall it was a major improvement from the primary. In a move that we’ll label brilliant, the Arizona Humane Society brought PUPPIES to one polling place for people to pet while they waiting in line. All the puppies were available for adoption. At press-time ballots are still being counted including more than 100,000 in Maricopa County. The race for secretary of state seems headed for a runoff.

Arkansas — Voters in Arkansas approved a constitutional amendment that will make the state’s existing voter ID law legal. Baxter County, which consolidated from 22 individual polling sites to 11 vote centers faced long lines on Election Day. Some voters in North Little Rock received incorrect ballots. Results were delayed in Phillips County due to faulty software. Officials in Benton County failed to count 900 ballots on election night because of an overlooked thumb drive. Republican John Thurston, Commissioner of State lands since 2011 was elected secretary of state.

California — While vote counting continues in many counties in California, there were some Election Day issues to talk about. Voters reported voting machine issues in Los Angeles County and Orange County. In San Diego County there were reports of a few dozen voters being left off the poll books. In San Joaquin County, a school board race was left off hundreds of ballots. Large turnout at vote centers lead to long lines and wait times in Sacramento County. Last-minute voters were faced with long lines, waits at the Riverside County registrar’s office. In Cudahy, a chicken walked into a polling site and distracted voters enough that they complained to county election officials. And incumbent Secretary of State Alex Padilla was elected to a second term.

Colorado — Although overall turnout is still shaking out, Colorado, with its system of vote-by-mail and vote centers had about a 78 percent turnout rate, one of the highest in the nation. There were some glitches in Mesa County including long lines, computer problems and a fire alarm. Voters in Aspen approved a ballot measure to change the municipal election day. In the race for secretary of state Democrat Jena Griswold defeated incumbent Wayne Williams.

Connecticut — The biggest problems in The Nutmeg State occurred in New Haven where once again the registrar of voters struggled to keep up with the volume of residents choosing to register and vote on Election Day. In Meridian, hundreds of voters were told they weren’t on the voter rolls. And like other areas, wet ballots caused problems with counting. Incumbent Secretary of State Denise Merrill was re-elected.

Delaware Strong storms didn’t stop voters in the First State from casting their ballots. There were some complaints about voters being asked for ID, although state Elections Commissioner Elaine Manlove pointed out that’s the longstanding practice.

District of Columbia — Voters and poll workers rushed to the aid of a voter in one D.C. precinct and administered CPR to save the voter’s life after he suffered a cardiac arrest. As the D.C. Fire & EMS tweeted after the incident, the voter did not get to cast his ballot, but he did get to live. Also in D.C. for a long time the city had only 99 percent of precincts reporting because on precinct—Precinct 110—the poll workers did not electronically transmit the results to the Board of Elections and then when a BOE representative went to the polling place to retrieve the results, the polling place was locked. Official were eventually able to retrieve the software on Wednesday.

Florida —While Florida has been pretty much all anyone can talk about since Election Day due to recounts in several hotly contested races, to be fair, Election Day itself in the Sunshine State was pretty smooth sailing  with only a few minor problems. We’ll go more in-depth into the recount in the weeks to come, but as for Election Day, like everywhere else, there were lines at polling places throughout the state. A man with a gun in a car in the parking lot of a Palm Bay polling placed caused some panic before he fled the scene. In Melbourne a man threatened to blow up the supervisor of elections office. Voters overwhelmingly voted to approve Amendment 4 which will automatically restore the rights to ex-felons once they’ve completed the terms of their service.

Georgia — Election 2018 is far from over in Georgia. On Election Day itself voters faced hour-long waits. Some of it was due to volume, some it was due to malfunctioning machines and others it was due to a lack of sufficient voting machines. Georgia remains in the headlines long after Election Day because the governor’s race has yet to be called with multiple lawsuits determining how and when absentee and provisional ballots will be counted. One thing is certain, the race to be Georgia’s next secretary of state is headed for a December runoff.

Hawaii — There was very little trouble in paradise on Election Day, but some Waianae polling places reported running out of same day registration forms. On Oahu, there were several broken voting machines early the morning that had to be fixed.

Idaho — High turnout in Bingham County forced the county elections office to bring additional voting machines to one polling place in Blackfoot. A high number of absentee ballots slowed the count in Latah County. Canyon County found 39 additional ballots from military and overseas voters that were not included in the election night, but were ultimately counted. Voters in Bonner County were alarmed that a paving project at the polling site was inhibiting access to the polling place.

Illinois — Two polling places in DuPage County were forced to stay open until 7:30pm due to machine failures earlier in the day. Students at Northern Illinois University in DeKalb County complained about long lines that prevented some of them from casting a ballot. The Danville Election Commission’s website suffered some sort of technical glitch on election night and people weren’t able to check it for results. During the initial posting of results, McHenry County failed to include 10 of thousands of votes. One polling place in Hyde Park temporarily ran out of ballots. Voters in Bloomington rejected a question that would have dissolved the city’s election commission.

Indiana — With 99 counties, there were numerous minor glitches and problems, and voters waiting in line throughout the Hoosier State, but nowhere were there problems like in Porter County and in Johnson County on Election Day. In Porter County, the county’s commission asked the FBI to investigate what they called “scores of alleged violations of Indiana Election Law.” The county did not even begin counting ballots until Wednesday morning, this after 12 of the county’s vote centers opened late on Election Day. Porter County Commissioner Jim Biggs attributed the county’s woes to a variety of factors, including heavy voter turnout, but told the Indianapolis Star “big changes” were needed to prevent a report of the situation in the county of about 170,000 residents. “What we have here is a total breakdown in the process,” he said. In Johnson County, Clerk Sue Ann Misiniec told The Daily Journal that it was a “perfect storm” of problems that lead to machine malfunctions on Election Day and late results on election night. Incumbent Secretary of State Connie Lawson was re-elected.

Iowa — There were very few reports of problems with the state’s voter ID. About 30 ballots in Winneshiek County arrived without postmarks and therefore could not be counted. For the first time Iowa counties conducted a post-election audit. Incumbent Secretary of State Paul Pate was elected to a second term.

Kansas — As was the case in several states, college students at Kansas State ran into issues when trying to cast their ballots due to a voter registration mix-up. Counting in Wichita County took longer than usual. “Human error” led to inaccurate election results being published by the Crawford County Clerk’s office. Platte County suffered a power outage during voting, but voters were able to continue casting ballots. There were few reported problems with Dodge City’s single re-located polling place, although county officials did bar the media from the polling place. Republican Scott Schwab has been elected secretary of state.

Kentucky — In Fayette County, high turnout forced the clerk to send 30 additional voting machines to polling places and people had plenty of complaints about the county’s voting machines. One Knott County polling place faced issues at the start of the day. A locked ballot box slowed down the early morning vote in Jefferson County. Early morning voters in Owensboro got the wrong ballots. In Hartford, it took a coin toss to determine who would be the sixth member of the city council.

Louisiana — Issues arose at a New Orleans polling place that allegedly refused to open its parking lot to voters with disabilities. In Livingston Parish Registrar Jared Andrews reported that polling places remained open during a power outage, despite what media reports said. In sad news, there were no “I Voted” stickers for voters this year with the secretary of state’s office and local elections offices doing some finger-pointing over costs. And in the secretary of state’s race incumbent Kyle Ardoin (R) will face attorney Gwen Collins-Greenup (D) in a runoff.

Maine — The big news out of Maine is that the state’s new ranked choice voting system came into play in a Congressional race. Ballot counting is ongoing at press time, but Republican Bruce Poliquin who seemed to be losing in the ranking of ballots filed suit saying the system violated his constitutional rights.

Maryland — Although turnout was high, there were relatively few problems throughout Maryland on Election Day except in Prince George’s County where one polling place ran out of ballots and it took officials, who blamed rush hour traffic, hours to get additional ballots to the site.  Voters approved a constitutional amendment to allow for same-day voter registration.

Massachusetts — A faulty voting machine in Falmouth had to be replaced. Linda Hathaway the Stow town clerk noted that Election Day is not really all that different than throwing a party—for 5,300 people. In Boston, although voters faced wait times of up to two hours, the voting was going smoothly, it was just a volume issue. At least one voter in Monterey faced an issue with a poll worker asking for a photo ID although the state does not require it. Incumbent Secretary of State William Galvin was re-elected for a seventh term.

Michigan — Interim Pontiac City Clerk Garland Doyle said that contrary to reports, there were no issues with absentee ballots. Large turnout in the Detroit area meant long lines. Voters in Houghton County, who thought they had registered to vote online turned up at the polls only to discover that they were not since Michigan does not  yet have online voter registration. Like voters in many other states, those in Michigan faced power outages as well. Voters in Michigan overwhelming approved Proposal 3 which will change the way they vote in future elections. In the secretary of state race, Democrat Jocelyn Benson defeated Republican Mary Treder Lang.

Minnesota— Results from Jackson County weren’t uploaded to the state’s website until 1:20am on Wednesday due to technical difficulties. Due to a high volume of absentee ballots and write-ins Olmstead County was  delayed in reporting results. The City of Tower once again faced problems on Election Day. Incumbent Secretary of State Steve Simon was re-elected.

Mississippi — Long lines faced voters in Harrison County. Greene County experienced a historic midterm election turnout of more than 71 percent, but hundreds of would-be voters were not allowed to cast a ballot. They filled out voter registration applications that were later rejected because attempts to verify their address failed. Mississippi will hold several runoffs in December.

Missouri— There was some confusion about what ID voters had to show in the Show-Me State. For hours elections officials in Clay County struggled with voting machines, but it wasn’t the fault of the machines, it was poll workers who were not properly operating the machines. A voting machine problem in Kansas City forced voters to leave their ballots in a pile to be scanned later. And high turnout saw several polling sites run low on ballots.

Montana — Heavy turnout and registration issues lead to long lines and delayed results in Butte County. Gallatin and Missoula counties saw an increase in provisional ballots. Wintry weather also caused some issues for voters in parts of the state. Cascade County had some issues getting all their ballots counted on election night.

Nebraska — High voter turnout, blank ballots and counting machine problems were among the things that lead to a delay in Saunders County election results. Republican Bob Evnen was elected to replace retiring Secretary of State John Gale.

Nevada — Voters faced long lines well past poll closing time which elections officials blamed on high turnout and a move to vote centers. In Las Vegas, 82 of 172 sites remained open past the 7p.m. close time. Some sites in Washoe County were open three hours after closing to accommodate voters in line. Computer programming problems slowed voters in Lyon County. Voters in Nevada approved Question 5 which will make registration automatic when they obtain a new or renew their driver’s license.

New Hampshire — Strong turnout and registration was reported throughout Manchester. A woman was seriously hurt when she was pinned under a car at a polling place in Windham. Other traffic problems and technical issues were among the calls fielded by the state’s Election Day Hotline.

New Jersey — As anticipated, the biggest issue in New Jersey stemmed from the state’s new vote-by-mail law. Not only were voters confused by the new law, but elections officials struggled with it as well leaving many ballots uncounted for several days after the polls closed. New voting equipment in parts of Union County proved troublesome for voters and elections officials.

New Mexico — There were very few issues on Election Day in the Land of Enchantment, but problems did arise on Dona Ana County on election night. The county received way more absentee ballots than it anticipated and it took longer to tally those than expected and now a candidate who had been winning on election night is losing and has asked the New Mexico State Police to impound the ballots. Incumbent Secretary of State Maggie Toulouse Oliver was re-elected.

New York — Perhaps you should expect problems on Election Day given that New York City has more than 9 million residents, but voters in Gotham once again faced a problem-filled day on Election Day. This time the problems seemed to stem from problems with wet ballots and not enough ballot-scanning machines to go around. Things got so bad at one point in the day that the president of the city council called on the board of elections director to resign. For his part, the BOE director accepted some of the blame, but also blamed voters for the problems and a two-page ballot. Voters in Saranac Lake had issues voting because of their IDs. In Ontario County poll workers ran pens under hot water to try and get them to work. And in our favorite Election Day tradition in the Empire State, women in Rochester placed their “I Voted” stickers on the grave of Susan B. Anthony.

North Carolina — High volume and high humidity caused problems in North Carolina on Election Day. The humidity caused issues with ballots properly feeding into the counting machines in Wake, Cumberland and a handful of other counties. Severe weather also knocked out power to a number of polling sites. Lenoir County and Wake County had some issues with election night tallies. Voters approved a constitutional amendment that would require them to show a photo ID at the polls in future elections.

North Dakota — After failed lawsuits, Native American tribes scrambled to get members IDs in order to cast ballots on Election Day and although there were some issues with IDs, Native voter turned out in record numbers on the 6th. Incumbent Secretary of State Al Jaeger won re-election, but announced that this will be his final term.

Ohio — Power, or lack thereof plagued many polling places throughout the day in Ohio, but voters were able to continue casting ballots, even if it meant doing it by flashlight in some instances. Some counties, such as Lucas and Miami had issues with reporting results. A new voter alert system in Hamilton County, while functioning properly, caused a quite a bit of confusion with voters. Due to high turnout, elections officials in Cuyahoga County had to print additional ballots. Republican Frank La Rose was elected secretary of state.

Oklahoma — Although there were reports of minor problems in polling places on Election Day, it was “nothing out of the ordinary,” according to Bryan Newell, director of operations for the American Civil Liberties Union of Oklahoma. Newell told local media it appeared elections officials were fixing those problems quickly.

Oregon — Oregon votes by mail and has automatic voter registration so the only thing we really have to report about in Oregon is that voters in Lane County shot down an effort to change the county’s voting system to the STAR system. STAR stands for Score Then Automatic Runoff which would have allowed voters to award each candidate a score ranging from 0 to 5. The two candidates with the highest cumulative scores would then go to an instant runoff.

Pennsylvania — Like most states, there were reports of high turnout which lead to long lines and wait times, and while there were technical issues in the commonwealth, there weren’t any major voting machine issues. In Pittsburgh, a man threatened to shoot up a polling place, in York County, there was a bomb threat and sadly in Forks Twp., a woman who had just voted was struck and killed by a car.  In Luzerne County, 15 of the county’s 220 e-poll books had battery issues. Philadelphia voters got their own, very special “I Voted” stickers.

Rhode Island — Like in many other states, there were reports of long lines to vote on Election Day in Rhode Island. A voting machine on Prudence Island had to be replaced and the new one had to be sent over on a ferry. And while initial reports were that no one at all voted in one Providence precinct, it turns out that one, one lone voter actually showed up an voted that day. Incumbent Secretary of State Nellie Gorbea was re-elected.

South Carolina — The biggest news out of the Palmetto State on November 6th was the ongoing problems that plagued the state’s aging voting equipment. The problems with the machines were exacerbated by high turnout and  lead to long lines in many of the state’s counties. And in Charleston, the machine issues were compounded by nearly 200 poll workers not showing up as assigned. Delays just didn’t plague voting either. A couple of counties—Richland and Beaufort—had reporting issues.

South Dakota — Following numerous problems with e-poll books during the primary earlier this year, Election Day was a a relatively smooth affair. Sioux Falls voters reported seeing KKK flyers on the ground at one polling place, but no one contacted the police about it. Republican Steve Barnett won the race for secretary of state.

Tennessee — Like many other states, Tennessee faced severe weather on Election Day that knocked out power to some polling places. Paper ballots had to be used in 3 Knox County polling places. One Shelby County polling place opened late and the county also experienced some issues during tabulation due to outdated equipment. Voters waited two hours to cast a ballot in Antioch. A computer glitch delayed results in Hawkins County. And in Memphis, voters shot down the city council’s attempt to repeal instant runoff voting.

Texas — Heavy voter turnout that began during early voting in Lone Star State showed no signs of slowing down on Election Day. About 400 Election Day ballots in Brazos County were uncounted after they were left in a voting machine. Straight-ticket voting, which has seen its last election in Texas, went out with a bang in Denton County. Vote centers in Nueces and Wichita counties were deemed successful. Four polling sites in Laredo ran out of ballots. Polling hours were extended in Harris County to accommodate the crowds. Travis County’s website crashed on Election Day.

U.S. Virgin Islands — This was the first major election the Caribbean territory has held since the devastation of Hurricane Maria and by all accounts, things went well and turnout was high. The territory is now preparing for runoff elections in December.

Utah — Although many people in Utah chose to cast their ballot by mail, people still showed up at the polls on Election Day. In Utah County that meant people were still waiting in line three hours after the polls had closed. Gov. Gary Hebert did not mince words over the administration of the election in Utah Co. “The voting public deserves better,” the governor told the Deseret News in a prepared statement. “Anytime we have a glitch on election night, Utah County seems to be the epicenter of dysfunction.”

Vermont — Election Day was relatively smooth in Vermont, but Vermont Public Radio did report that non-English speaking voters had issues at the polls in Burlington. Incumbent Secretary of State Jim Condos was re-elected.

Virginia— Turnout was high during early absentee voting and on Election Day throughout the Commonwealth. In the city of Chesapeake, voters in one precinct received incorrect ballots. Like other states, polling places in Virginia were hit with power outages, but voting continued. In Roanoke County, e-poll books could not connect to the server so poll workers relied on paper rolls. Dozens of Radford students were turned away from the polls after there were issues with their ballots.

Washington — Although turnout was high, there few if any problems reported in this all vote-by-mail state.

West Virginia — Like many states, voters in West Virginia faced severe weather on Election Day with some suffering power outages. In Kanawha County there was a 1,700 vote discrepancy between the printouts from the voting machines and the ballot stubs from the poll workers. The secretary of state’s office is investigating why voters were left of the rolls in Raleigh County. And in the most talked about thing in the Mountain State from the 2018 election, about 144 West Virginians in 30 states used the new Voatz app to cast their ballots.

Wisconsin — Election Day was relatively trouble-free in the Badger State with record midterm turnout. There were some issues though such as in Milwaukee where 2,000 absentee ballots had to be remade after there were issues with the glue to seal the envelopes. Misprinted ballots were given to at least 54 voters in Stratford and hundreds of voters go incorrect ballots in Howard. GOATS! A group called Next Gen Wisconsin hosted a Votes and Goats petting zoo at a polling place in Stevens Point. Although there was no news of it on Election Day, a Milwaukee-area man was charged with making threats against polling places. And on opposite ends of the spectrum there were reports of two poll workers wearing inappropriate clothing.

Wyoming —Like many states, Wyoming saw in an increase in early/absentee voting ahead of the 6th.Election Day and night were relatively smooth in the Cowboy State. In Campbell County, elections officials did have to remake about 30 absentee ballots in order for them to be counted. Incumbent Secretary of State Ed Buchanan (R) was elected for the first time (he had previously been appointed to the seat).

 

Federal-State Updates

The Washington Post has a report this week, that President Donald J. Trump will soon replace Kirstjen Nielsen as secretary of the Department of Homeland Security.

According to The Post, The president has grumbled for months about what he views as Nielsen’s lackluster performance on immigration enforcement and is believed to be looking for a replacement who will implement his policy ideas with more alacrity. The announcement could come as soon as this week, three of these officials said.

The paper notes that Chief of Staff John F. Kelly, who is also on shaky ground in the Administration, is pushing for the president to keep Nielsen.

Election News This Week

This week, the Iowa Public Safety Advisory Board recommended that the state should restore the voting rights to formerly incarcerated residents. The Iowa Legislature created the board about eight years ago to analyze current or proposed criminal laws. It is comprised of 16 voting and six non-voting members that include four lawmakers. the advisory board voted to recommend lawmakers restore the voting rights of offenders. Details such as whether that would begin after completing prison or making restitution would be left to lawmakers to decide. No members opposed the recommendation, which was taken via a voice vote Wednesday. Iowa remains one of only two states that permanently ban felons from voting unless their rights are restored by the governor.

Allen County, Indiana Elections Director Beth Dlug has been getting an ear full since Election Day. Not over how the election was administered, by all accounts it was smooth and efficient, but because the county did not hand out “I Voted” stickers on Election Day. “That’s the No. 1 question I get,” Dlug told the Journal Gazette.. “Everyone wants a sticker.” Dlug said that in the past she had not purchased the stickers because of the cost, but said that given the demand, she is starting to relent.

Retiring Nebraska Secretary of State John Gale recently awarded the Scottsbluff Star-Herald  with the Civics Recognition Award for the paper’s coverage to election issues in the state. “My office follows statewide media in terms of reporting and covering elections,” Gale said when presenting the award. “Print media does such a fabulous job of presenting trustworthy and extensive information on election deadlines, how to register, who are the candidates and the issues, how to vote early and a lot more.” Gale also honored the Sidney Sun-Telegraph.

The Minneapolis Star-Tribune recently announced that Scott Simon had been re-elected secretary of state and within moments, the NPR host began receiving congratulatory tweets. Wait…what? Seems the Star-Tribune had inadvertently written Scott instead of Steve in a headline and the host of NPR’s Weekend Edition Saturday ran with it during his Saturday’s show. Fortunately, as far as we know, we’ve never suffered the same typo fate as the Star-Tribune did, but as long time NPR listeners, we do have to remind ourselves every time we write about Minnesota, that it’s STEVE Simon! Congratulations to Secretary Simon on his re-election and to Scott Simon on his brief brush with election-geek fame.

Get Well: Best wishes for a speedy recovery for Boone County, Kentucky Clerk Kenny Brown who suffered a heart attack late on election night. According to the Northern Kentucky Tribune, Brown is in stable condition and Election Supervisor Dawn Spritzky is in charge until he returns. On Monday, Brown updated his Facebook page to let everyone know that he was home and doing well.

Personnel News: Wanda William, Edgartown, Massachusetts town clerk will retire on November 30. Robyn Crittenden has been appointed Georgia secretary of state after Brian Kemp resigned. Joan Weaver, Cullman County, Alabama election coordinator is retiring. Marion County, Ohio Board of Elections Deputy Director Sue Schwamberger, who has been in the post since 2012 has been fired by the BOE. Andrew English (R) a Navy veteran and general counsel for Kentucky’s Justice and Public Safety Cabinet has announced his candidacy for Kentucky secretary of state. Macon County, Illinois Clerk Steve Bean is retiring. John Million has resigned from the White County, Indiana board of elections after 30 years.

Legislative Updates

Federal Legislation: According to Capital Public Radio, when Democrats take control of the House in January, the first legislative vote will be on H.R. 1 that will establish automatic voter registration and reinvigorate the Voting Rights Act.

Federal Legislation: This week, the House unanimously approved a bill to establish a new cybersecurity agency known as the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA). The bill will also rebrand DHS’ main cybersecurity unit, known as National Protection and Programs Directorate (NPPD), as the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Protection Agency. That means that the headquarters will be a full-fledged operational component of DHS.

Delaware: According to Delaware Public Radio, some lawmakers have said they will again try to bring forward legislation that would allow for early voting in the First State. State Rep. Pete Schwartzkopf said it would help Delawareans avoid potential barriers to voting – like bad weather.

District of Columbia: Seven members of the Council of the District of Columbia voted to table a bill that would have extended voting rights to 16-year-olds, not only for local elections, but also federal elections. “It’s not dead,” Charles Allen, the councilmember who introduced the bill told The Washington Post. “But something has to change for the votes to be able to bring it back. Clearly, I’ve got some colleagues that are afraid of change. Change can be scary.”

Mississippi: State Sen. David Blount said that he will introduce legislation in January to reform some of the state’s voting laws including the need to have an absentee ballot notarized which Blount equated to a poll tax.

New York: The Assembly’s Standing Committee on Election Law will hold a public hearing in Manhattan to review Election Day operations and possible ways to improve the voting experience.

Legal Updates

Alabama: Attorneys representing black students at Alabama A&M University filed a federal lawsuit asking that the students’ votes in the midterm election be counted. As evidence, the lawsuit includes screen shots of the Alabama Secretary of State’s website showing the four students filing the lawsuit as ineligible the day of the election and eligible two days later. U.S. District Judge Madeline Haikala ruled that the votes of the students would not count.

Maine: Republican candidate Rep. Bruce Poliquin has sued the state of Maine over the use of the voter-approved ranked choice voting system. The suit argues that the new ranked-choice law distorts the wishes of voters, particular those who chose to only select one candidate.

New Jersey: Lizaida Camis, 55, of Hoboken, pleaded guilty before U.S. District Court Judge William J. Martini in Newark federal court to conspiracy to use mail to promote a voter bribery scheme during the 2013 municipal election in Hoboken, authorities said.

New Mexico: Representing four voters from around the state, former Attorney General Paul Bardacke asked the state Supreme Court to strike down New Mexico’s closed primary election system, contending it violates a provision of the state Constitution prohibiting the government from using public funds to benefit private organizations. He argues the public should not have to foot the bill for primary elections if the only people allowed to participate are voters affiliated with private associations.

Also in New Mexico, Republican state Representative and congressional candidate Yvette Herrell wants New Mexico State Police to impound all absentee ballots cast in Doña Ana County in the Nov. 6 general election. On election night, Herrell was leading, but once all provisional and absentee ballots were counted her opponent was in the lead.

New York: State Supreme Court Justice Patrick F. MacRae, on Friday, asked the sheriff’s deputies in eight counties to secure computer memory sticks from voting machines, paper ballots, absentee ballots, affidavit ballots and related election records in the 22nd Congressional district race.

Pennsylvania: Voting rights advocates have sued the commonwealth over its deadlines to return absentee ballots. The suit called the deadline “unreasonably early.”

Texas: The Texas Attorney General’s office has arrested nine additional people for allegedly voting illegally in the 2017 Edinburg municipal election. To-date, 14 people have been arrested for voting illegally in 2017 in Edinburg.

Bexar County Judge Stephani Walsh has denied a request to extend the deadline to count provisional ballots in Bexar County meaning they must be validated by 5 p.m. on Tuesday with military and overseas votes being accepted until 7p.m.

U.S. Virgin Islands: USVI Attorney General Claude Walker filed a request for a temporary restraining order to stop the board of elections from registering new voters in advance of the November 20 runoff. The court granted the restraining order on Wednesday.

Utah: U.S. District Court Judge David Nuffer dismissed a case over whether or not Willie Grayeyes should be allowed to run for office in Utah. In June, Grayeyes sued San Juan County  after he was kicked off the ballot based on allegations that he resided in Arizona rather than Utah. In the lawsuit his attorneys argued that those allegations violated his constitutional rights, specifically his right to vote. Grayeyes is from Navajo Mountain, a community close to the Utah-Arizona border. Limited roads require residents to travel back and forth between the two states. Grayeyes currently leads his Republican opponent by 95 votes in a race for San Juan County commissioner.

Wisconsin: Brand Baker, 20 is being held for allegedly making threats and referencing a polling location. A search warrant noted that Baker said he wanted to go to a polling place and “air it out.”

Opinions This Week

National Opinions: Before 2020 | Voting machines, II, III | Election integrity| Election security | Voting rights, II, III, IV, V | Election reform | Vote-by-mail | Same-day registration | I Voted stickers | Election hacking | Ballot design | Voter fraud, II, III, IV, V | Automatic voter registration | Early voting

Alabama: Voter suppression

Arizona: Ballot counting

Arkansas: Voter suppression

California: Voting booth nostalgia | Ballot postage | Ballot counting, II, III | Voting system

Colorado: Election season

Connecticut: New Haven problems, II | Voter ID | Young voters

District of Columbia: Voting age

Florida: Voter fraud | Broward County, II | Recount, II, III | Vote-by-mail | Undervotes | Amendment 4 | Election system, II | Bay County | Fake ballots

Georgia: Voting issues | Voting system | Voting rights | Vote counting

Idaho: Election judges | Spanish-language ballots

Indiana: St. Joseph County | Voting issues | Porter County, II, III

Kansas: Ford County | Voter participation

Kentucky: Election reform

Louisiana: Secretary of state

Maine: Ranked choice voting

Minnesota: Otter Tail County | Turnout | Ex-felon voting rights

Missouri: Voter access | Ex-felon voting rights

Montana: Ballot counting

New Hampshire: Secretary of state race, II

New Jersey: Ex-felon voting rights, II | Vote-by-mail | Voting system

New Mexico: Voting process

New York: New York City BOE, II, III, IV | Ballot style | Franklin County | Early voting | Vote-by-mail

North Carolina: Voter ID, II, III, IV | Election observation

North Dakota: Voter ID | Native American voters

Pennsylvania: Early voting | Election improvements

South Carolina: Voting machines | Lines

Texas: Election judges | Election Day | Early voting | Turnout | Harris County

U.S. Virgin Islands: Board of elections, II

Utah: Election security | Election woes

Virginia: Ex-felon voting rights

Washington: Vote-by-mail | Election security

West Virginia: Poll workers | Election preparation | Kanawha County

Wisconsin: Election judges | Early voting | Voter ID

Clearie Awards Deadline Extended!

EAC Extends Deadline for Third Annual Competition for Best Practices in Election Administration

The U.S. Election Assistance Commission (EAC) has extended the deadline for submissions for its third annual “Clearie” awards, a national competition for best practices in election administration, until Friday, November 30, 2018. This year, the Commission will present awards in the categories of best practices related to voting accessibility, outstanding innovations in elections, and recruiting, training and retaining election workers. All entries must be received no later than Friday, November 30, 2018.

This year, the Clearie awards are dedicated the life and legacy of Wendy Noren and R. Brian Lewis. Wendy Noren served as Boone County Clerk for over three decades and was a member of the EAC’s Board of Advisors before passing away in July 2018 following a long battle with cancer. R. Brian Lewis served as Counsel to the office of the Senate Majority Leader before his passing and was an early and steadfast proponent of the Help America Vote Act (HAVA) and election officials. Both were luminaries in the field of election administration who will long be remembered for their work and friendship.

“Election officials are known for their commitment to the values expressed in the EAC Clearie awards: excellence, innovation, maintaining accuracy and integrity in the election process and ensuring all eligible citizens can cast a ballot,” said EAC Chairman Thomas Hicks. “The Clearies are a testament to their work and dedication and highlight best practices other election administrators can emulate.”

This year’s entries will be judged using the following criteria:

  • Efficacy
  • Innovation
  • Sustainability
  • Outreach efforts
  • Cost-effectiveness
  • Replicability

All submissions should be sent to the EAC via an email to clearinghouse@eac.gov. Nominators should use the following subject lines based on entry category: Election Worker Competition, Accessibility Competition or Outstanding Innovations Competition.

All entries must include a brief summary of the election program nominated and attach relevant documents, images and links that can be used to assess the entry. Submissions should also include contact information for the person submitting the program for consideration. Each entry must be submitted in a separate email.

For more information about this year’s competition, please contact Patrick Leahy at pleahy@eac.gov.

Upcoming Events

Council of State Governments Annual Conference — The Council of State Government will hold its 2018 National Conference in the Northern Kentucky, Greater Cincinnati area in December. Keynote speakers are J.D. Vance, author of Hillbilly Elegy and Story Musgrave who started life in the Marines and finished is public service at NASA where he spent more than 1,200 hours in space. The conference will include a 2.5 hour session on election cybersecurity communications mapping. Where: Cincinnati, Ohio. When: December 6-8.

Election Audit Summit—The Election Audit Summit will provide a space for participants from across the scientific, policy and legal worlds to discuss new developments in the field of post-election auditing, and engage in the ongoing conversation on the current status and future directions of the election audits in the United States. Where: Cambridge, Massachusetts. When: December 7-8.

International Association of Government Officials — IGO’s 2019 mid-winter conference will be held in Irvine, California, January 6-11, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

Joint Election Officials Liaison Conference (JEOLC) —The Election Center’s Joint Election Officials Liaison Conference (JEOLC) will be held in Arlington, Virginia, January 10-11, 2019. Watch this space for more details and agendas.

National Association of State Election Directors — The NASED Winter Conference will be held in Washington DC, February 1-4, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of Secretaries of State — The NASS Winter Conference will be held in Washington, DC, February 1-4, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

Election Center Special Workshop — The Election Center will hold a special workshop that will include: Course 7 (Facilitating Voter Participation); Course 8 (Implementation of New Programs); and Renewal Course 31 (Election Storytelling ). Where: Birmingham, Alabama. When: February 25-26.

Election Center Special Workshop —The Election Center will hold a special workshop that will include: Course 9 (Enfranchisement, Enhancement, Enforcement ); Course 10 (Constitution, Courts & Cases to 1965); and Renewal Course 14 (Crisis Management). Where: Virginia Beach. When: April 24-28.

International Association of Government Officials — IGO’s 2019 Annual Conference will be held in Houston, Texas, July 11-17. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of Counties — NACo’s 2019 Annual Conference will be held in Clark County (Las Vegas), Nevada July 11-15, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of State Election Directors — The NASED Summer Conference will be held in Austin, Texas, July 14-16, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

Job Postings This Week

Marketplace

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Voting Booths
Each aluminum briefcase contains the following: aluminum legs, privacy shield, writing base, light assembly. All units are in great shape dimensions are 22”x 18”x 3“. MFG: ESL. Election supplies Limited, Napa California. Quantity: 400 Price per unit is $50. Contact Greg Larson 408.569.1004

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In Focus This Week

November 8, 2018

November 8, 2018

In Focus This Week

Lines, glitches, humidity, goats. In other words a typical election
Pre-election fears of hacking fail to materialize

By M. Mindy Moretti
electionline.org

The 2018 election has already been hacked! Voter suppression! Voter fraud! Those were some of the headlines that screamed at voters and elections officials in the days leading up to the 2018 general election, but in the light of the day, the 2018 election turned out to be far less chaotic than many people anticipated.

Yes, there were lines. There were machine malfunctions. There were bomb and gun threats. Some people were denied their right to vote. There were goats. But with turnout hovering around 49 percent, from a seasoned-election observers eye, the 2018 election was fairly business as usual—at least as far as the process goes.

This week, given time constraints, we’re just doing a brief review of Election Day 2018. Next week we’ll take a look at what happened — good, bad, silly and sad — state-by-state and in the coming weeks we’ll drill down into some of the bigger issues that arose, why they arose and what the next steps are. You can also check out our Election Day Dispatches.

Election Security — For two years the security of America’s elections have been drilled into our heads. From the Department of Homeland Security, all the way down to the smallest election authority, officials worked and worried to make sure that the 2018 elections were secure. And at the end of the day, election security really turned out to be a non-issue in 2018. The Department of Homeland Security’s cyber unit fielded some false alarms, but no hacks.

Voter ID — Voters in Missouri and Iowa faced new voter ID requirements this year and some issues did arise in Missouri where a judge had altered the rules in the days leading up to the election. In Iowa, initial reports indicate that overall things went smoothly. In North Dakota, where Native American tribes had fought the state’s ID law to the last minute, turnout of Native Americans broke records. In additional ID news, voters in North Carolina and Arkansas both voted to amend their state’s constitutions to institute voter ID.

Voter Registration — Millions of voters registered to vote in the waning days of the election cycle and overall it seems that counties were able to get all those folks on the rolls. Election day registration in Connecticut created huge lines in some towns. Voters in Nevada approved automatic registration. In Maryland, voters approved election day registration and in Michigan, as part of a larger election-reform package, voters approved same day registration.

Lines/Turnout — Although the numbers aren’t final yet, turnout is hovering right around 49 percent which is the highest midterm turnout in years. The last time midterm turnout broke 49 percent was 1966. Not every state broke midterm records, but many did. Large turnout lead to lines in many places as well as ballot shortages some states including Ohio and Maryland. And a preliminary analysis by CIRCLE found that voters aged 18-29 increased their overall turnout to 31 percent which is 10 percent higher than for the 2014 midterms.

Voting Equipment — While prior to Tuesday, we expressed some concern about voters seeing new equipment for the first time might cause confusion or delays, in reality it was aging voting equipment that seemed to cause the most of the issues both in voting and counting. Issues ranged from ballot printer malfunctions, calibration problems with aging touchscreen machines, and humidity and dampness warped paper ballots.

Power Outages — Due to severe weather, polling places across the country faced power outages throughout the day on Tuesday although there were no reports of the voting being affected by the outages.

Secretary of State Races — Secretary of state offices were on the ballot in 24 states. There will be nine new secretaries (Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Kansas, Michigan, Ohio, Nebraska and South Dakota),  in the coming months and we’ll meet them all in due time and incumbent secretaries (Alabama, California, Connecticut, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Rhode Island, Vermont and Wyoming)  were re-elected in 13 states. There will be runoffs in Georgia and Louisiana.

Election News This Week

It’s never a good time for a fire, but a few days before a midterm election is an especially bad time, but that’s what happened to the Shenandoah County, Virginia registrar’s office when a printer malfunctioned. Fortunately no one was hurt but the damage from the fire and sprinkler system was enough that the office will have to relocate for the foreseeable future. “Based on our preliminary review of the damage resulting from the sprinkler system’s activation, it appears all voter records and any absentee ballots casts in advance of next week’s election have been protected and are secure. We are grateful the damage was not more extensive,” Lisa McDonald, Shenandoah County voter registrar told WHSV.

Concern has been growing over the use of schools as polling places in Nassau County, New York and recently the North Hempstead Town Supervisor Judi Bosworth reached out to the Nassau County BOE offer town facilities as potential future voting sites. “Please know that my number one priority is maintaining the safety and security of our communities here in North Hempstead,” Bosworth told The Island Now. “In order to further protect our children, residents, teachers, and school administrators, I believe it would be prudent for the Board of Elections to consider this request.”

According to The Baltimore Sun, Harford County Elections Director Kevin Keene and Deputy Director Dale Livingston were put on paid administrative leave on October 31 and Cynthia Allred, secretary of the county board of elections, was named acting director. William G. Christoforo Jr., president of the board of elections refused to comment on the situation. Allred, who said no acting deputy director is in place “at this time,” declined to provide further information on why Keene and Livingston are on leave, or who had made the decision to put them on leave.

When her son with autism expressed an interest in voting, Massachusetts mother Susan Senator knew she would have to do something to help ease his anxieties so she created booklet for her son called “Voting is really important. Here’s how to do it.” According to CNN, the nine-page resource walks him through the process, complete with pictures of the ballot, which he could practice bubbling in, and reminders about the candidates running for different positions. “For any person, the more you know about how something works, the better you’re going to perform,” Senator said. We love this idea!

Personnel News: Will County, Illinois Clerk Nancy Schultz Voots will retire following the 2018 elections. She has been in the clerk’s office since 1976 and the clerk since 2002.

Legislative Updates

District of Columbia: The Committee on the Judiciary and Public Safety has approved a bill that would extend voting rights to 16-year-olds in the District in all elections, including federal elections. The bill is expected to come before the full council on November 13.

Montana: Secretary of State Corey Stapleton will testify before the State Administration and Veteran’s Affairs Committee on Nov. 13 regarding spending on two contracts including one for $265,000 to reprint the state voter guide after errors were found.

New Jersey: In April Gov. Phil Murphy (D) signed legislation into law requiring automatic voter registration at all state Motor Vehicle Commission offices by November 1 and on November 1, the MVC announced that the system was live. All eligible state residents who apply for a driver’s license, an examination permit, a probationary driver’s license or a non-driver identification card will be registered to vote.

Legal Updates

California: Richard Anthony Hamilton, 22 has been charged with voting twice in the 2016 presidential election as well as the primary. He was also registered twice, once with his actual birthdate and once with a false birthdate.

Also in California, Deidra Vrooman has been charged with felony election fraud for casting two ballots in the 2016 primary election. Vrooman was mailed two ballots, one from Nevada County and one from Alameda County. She was living out of her car at the time and did not know where she was currently registered, so she sent both back. “It was just my right to vote, so I voted,” Vrooman explained to KRON. “I was mailed two ballots by the government so I was just following instructions to send them both in.”

Florida: U.S. District Judge Mark Walker rebuked Duval County Supervisor of Elections Mike Hogan for not following his September court order to provide sample ballots available at early voting sites. According to News 4, Walker rebuked Hogan and ordered that sample ballots in Spanish be at all voting precincts on Election Day.  “The cause of this motion was Duval County Supervisor of Elections Mike Hogan’s strained and selective reading of this Court’s preliminary injunction order,” Walker wrote. “His reading … inexplicably ignored this Court’s unambiguous language.”

Georgia: U.S. District Judge Eleanor Ross ruled that Georgia’s “exact match” requirement voter identification “places a severe burden” on prospective voters and will not apply for the midterm. According to Courthouse News Service, Ross directed Kemp’s office to allow  county election officials to permit individuals flagged and placed in pending status due to citizenship to vote a regular ballot by furnishing proof of citizenship to poll managers or deputy registrars. “To be clear, once an individual’s citizenship has been verified by a deputy registrar or a poll manager, that individual may cast a regular ballot and the vote counts,” Ross said.

Kansas: U.S. District Court Judge Daniel Crabtree said forcing Ford County Clerk Debbie Cox to open an additional polling location in Dodge City so close to the election would not be in the public’s interest. Crabtree did question Cox’s actions though. And while the court must evaluate the fully-developed facts governing this claim on a later day, the court notes, for now, its concerns about Ms. Cox’s ‘LOL’ comment and questions whether it manifests a disregard for the ‘fundamental significance’ that our Constitution places on the right to vote,” Crabtree wrote.

New York: On Election Day, the League of Women Voters sued the state of New York over the state’s voter registration cutoff date calling it “arbitrary and unnecessary.” “As a direct result of the voter registration cutoff, many thousands of constitutionally eligible voters in every election cycle are denied their fundamental right to vote,” says the complaint according to Courthouse News Service, which attorneys at the American Civil Liberties Union filed in Manhattan Supreme Court.

North Dakota: A last-ditch legal effort to halt North Dakota’s voter ID law was denied by U.S. District Court Judge Daniel L. Hovland. In his two-page order, Hovland said it was too close to the election to make any changes. He noted that “federal courts are unanimous in their judgment that it is highly important to preserve the status quo when elections are fast approaching.”

Texas: District Judge Justin Sanderson ordered that dozens of voters whose mail-in ballots were slated for rejection should be notified in time to vote on Tuesday. At least 86 mail-in ballots were flagged last week for potential discrepancies in signatures between the application form and the returned ballot, elections office.

Tech Thursday

Social Media: A group of volunteer researchers and technologists led by Guardians.ai, a New York startup that’s focused on protecting pro-democracy organizations from information warfare and cyber-attack released a study that identified what they said is a coordinated network of Twitter accounts that push false and misleading narratives about election integrity with hashtags like #VoterFraud. According to Bloomberg, they found a core of 200 accounts that tweeted or were mentioned in tweets more than 140 million times over the last year.

Computer Servers: A survey by ProPublica found that computer servers that powered Kentucky’s online voter registration and Wisconsin’s election results reporting site ran software that could potentially expose information to hackers or enable access to sensitive files without a password. According to ProPublica, officials in both states said that voter-registration data has not been compromised and that their states’ infrastructure was protected against infiltration. Still, Wisconsin said it turned off its FTP service following ProPublica’s inquiries. Kentucky left its password-free service running and said ProPublica didn’t understand its approach to security.

Opinions This Week

National Opinions: Voting system, II, III, IV, V, VI, |Voter privacy | Election fears | Too poor to vote | Millennials | Election hacking | Audits | Voting rights, II | Department of Justice | Online voting, II | Voter suppression, II | Voting problems | Election integrity | “I Voted” stickers

California: DMV problems | Vote count | Los Angeles County

Colorado: Secretary of state race | Weld County

Florida: Ex-felon voting rights, II, III, IV, V | Election-day holiday | Seminole County

Georgia: Brian Kemp | Wait times | Election workers

Illinois: Poll workers | Early voting

Kansas: Secretary of state race

Louisiana: Secretary of state race

Massachusetts: Secretary of state race

Missouri: Early voting, II, III

New Jersey: Vote-by-mail

New Mexico: Turnout

New York: New York City voting problems, II

North Carolina: Voter ID | Election holiday

North Dakota: Voter ID

Ohio: Secretary of state race

Rhode Island: Secretary of state

South Carolina: Voting system

Tennessee: Voter suppression

Utah: Election Day registration

Clearie Awards Deadline Extended

EAC Extends Deadline for Third Annual Competition for Best Practices in Election Administration

The U.S. Election Assistance Commission (EAC) has extended the deadline for submissions for its third annual “Clearie” awards, a national competition for best practices in election administration, until Friday, November 30, 2018. This year, the Commission will present awards in the categories of best practices related to voting accessibility, outstanding innovations in elections, and recruiting, training and retaining election workers. All entries must be received no later than Friday, November 30, 2018.

This year, the Clearie awards are dedicated the life and legacy of Wendy Noren and R. Brian Lewis. Wendy Noren served as Boone County Clerk for over three decades and was a member of the EAC’s Board of Advisors before passing away in July 2018 following a long battle with cancer. R. Brian Lewis served as Counsel to the office of the Senate Majority Leader before his passing and was an early and steadfast proponent of the Help America Vote Act (HAVA) and election officials. Both were luminaries in the field of election administration who will long be remembered for their work and friendship.

“Election officials are known for their commitment to the values expressed in the EAC Clearie awards: excellence, innovation, maintaining accuracy and integrity in the election process and ensuring all eligible citizens can cast a ballot,” said EAC Chairman Thomas Hicks. “The Clearies are a testament to their work and dedication and highlight best practices other election administrators can emulate.”

This year’s entries will be judged using the following criteria:

  • Efficacy
  • Innovation
  • Sustainability
  • Outreach efforts
  • Cost-effectiveness
  • Replicability

All submissions should be sent to the EAC via an email to clearinghouse@eac.gov. Nominators should use the following subject lines based on entry category: Election Worker Competition, Accessibility Competition or Outstanding Innovations Competition.

All entries must include a brief summary of the election program nominated and attach relevant documents, images and links that can be used to assess the entry. Submissions should also include contact information for the person submitting the program for consideration. Each entry must be submitted in a separate email.

For more information about this year’s competition, please contact Patrick Leahy at pleahy@eac.gov.

Upcoming Events

Council of State Governments Annual Conference — The Council of State Government will hold its 2018 National Conference in the Northern Kentucky, Greater Cincinnati area in December. Keynote speakers are J.D. Vance, author of Hillbilly Elegy and Story Musgrave who started life in the Marines and finished is public service at NASA where he spent more than 1,200 hours in space. The conference will include a 2.5 hour session on election cybersecurity communications mapping. Where: Cincinnati, Ohio. When: December 6-8.

Election Audit Summit—The Election Audit Summit will provide a space for participants from across the scientific, policy and legal worlds to discuss new developments in the field of post-election auditing, and engage in the ongoing conversation on the current status and future directions of the election audits in the United States. Where: Cambridge, Massachusetts. When: December 7-8.

International Association of Government Officials — IGO’s 2019 mid-winter conference will be held in Irvine, California, January 6-11, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

Joint Election Officials Liaison Conference (JEOLC) —The Election Center’s Joint Election Officials Liaison Conference (JEOLC) will be held in Arlington, Virginia, January 10-11, 2019. Watch this space for more details and agendas.

National Association of State Election Directors — The NASED Winter Conference will be held in Washington DC, February 1-4, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of Secretaries of State — The NASS Winter Conference will be held in Washington, DC, February 1-4, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

Election Center Special Workshop — The Election Center will hold a special workshop that will include: Course 7 (Facilitating Voter Participation); Course 8 (Implementation of New Programs); and Renewal Course 31 (Election Storytelling ). Where: Birmingham, Alabama. When: February 25-26.

Election Center Special Workshop —The Election Center will hold a special workshop that will include: Course 9 (Enfranchisement, Enhancement, Enforcement ); Course 10 (Constitution, Courts & Cases to 1965); and Renewal Course 14 (Crisis Management). Where: Virginia Beach. When: April 24-28.

International Association of Government Officials — IGO’s 2019 Annual Conference will be held in Houston, Texas, July 11-17. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of Counties — NACo’s 2019 Annual Conference will be held in Clark County (Las Vegas), Nevada July 11-15, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of State Election Directors — The NASED Summer Conference will be held in Austin, Texas, July 14-16, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

Job Postings This Week

electionlineWeekly publishes election administration job postings each week as a free service to our readers. To have your job listed in the newsletter, please send a copy of the job description, including a web link to mmoretti@electionline.org.  Job postings must be received by 5pm on Wednesday in order to appear in the Thursday newsletter. Listings will run for three weeks or till the deadline listed in the posting.

Assistant Inspector General for Audit, U.S. Election Assistance Commission —The Assistant Inspector General for Audit (AIGA) directs or conducts performance audits, evaluations, inspections and reviews of EAC programs, functions, and operations. The incumbent maintains personal contact with key senior officials within and outside of EAC, such as management and officials of CIGIE, OMB, GAO, other Federal and state agencies, contractors and educational or research groups. Participates with the IG in developing the annual audit plan; determining the scope of each audit; developing and adjusting audit guides when necessary to meet special or unusual circumstances; and participating in entrance and exit conferences with auditees (city, county, state, and/or EAC officials). The AIGA supervises the work of subordinates, if any, and monitors the work of contractors. Salary: $119,5897-$141328. Deadline: November 30.  Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Certification Manager (Denver, CO) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Certification Manager to join our team in Denver, CO! This position is a cross -functional leader playing a key role in managing certification efforts for Dominion Voting products. In this role, you will act as a representative of the company with State and Federal certification officials, test labs, and other key internal and external stakeholders throughout the certification process. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Certification Project Manager, Hart InterCivic — The Certification Project Manager manages state and federal certification projects of our Hardware and Software products, under the direction of the Certification Program Manager. The Certification Project Manager must be able to exercise sound judgment and interact with regulatory authorities in a professional manner, particularly in high-pressure situations. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Customer Relations Manager (Phoenix, AZ) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Customer Relations Manager to join our team in Phoenix, AZ! This position will be responsible for effectively and proactively managing the day-to-day relationship, administration and technical/product support of one or more assigned customer accounts. Additionally, the CRM will serve as project manager for specialized projects such as pre- and postelection day support, new product implementations, and/or product upgrades/updates. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Director of Government Affairs, Hart InterCivic — The Hart InterCivic Director of Government Affairs oversees all aspects of support services for Hart’s government relations activities for state and federal government entities. These include: identifying and engaging critical stakeholders at the federal, state, and county level, researching and providing consistent and proactive communication of company’s regulatory strategy, partnering with key internal cross-functional departments, participating in industry forums ensuring active engagement where most critical, and developing monitoring/measurement tools to provide visibility and transparency. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Program Manager, CIS— the Elections Program Manager is assigned to the Elections Infrastructure ISAC (EI-ISAC) at the Center for Internet Security. Reporting to the Director of the EI-ISAC, the Elections Program Manager will partner with other cybersecurity team members to promote the CIS mission and help support our growth. The primary purpose of this position is to serve as a subject matter expert on and represent the EI-ISAC in public forums regarding election infrastructure issues. The Elections Program Manager will work with the EI-ISAC Director to build relationships in the elections community and identify tools, products, and initiatives that meet the security needs of election officials. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Field Sales Director, Hart InterCivic — the Field Sales Director works primarily on the road and from a home office when he/she is not on business travel. The Field Sales Director is responsible for creating news sales with prospects and existing clients in a defined region. Today, this role is a single contributor and does not directly manage people.   This position will report to the VP of Sales. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Full Stack Architect / Senior Software Engineer, Clear Ballot— Clear Ballot is looking for an accomplished, Boston MA based Architect/Senior Software Engineer who wants to bring their technical and leadership skills to bear on a hugely consequential problem: Bringing transparency to democratic elections. The successful candidate will implement new products and features under tight deadlines. You will be using primarily Python and MySQL that interface with front-end web applications implemented in JavaScript and HTML5. The ideal candidate should have strong technical and leadership skills and a good working knowledge of the latest concepts in security, performance, and resilience. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build and enhance a platform that is changing the elections industry. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Full Stack Software Developer, Clear Ballot — The successful candidate will build and enhance enterprise-level, highly available applications using primarily Python and MySQL that interface with frontend web applications implemented in JavaScript and HTML5. The ideal candidate should have strong technical skills and a good working knowledge of the latest concepts in performance, security and resilience. One of the hallmarks of our system is its emphasis on new visualization techniques made possible by sophisticated data structures that enable high-performance in a multi-user environment. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build and enhance a platform that is changing the elections industry. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

General Counsel, Campaign Legal Center— CLC’s General Counsel provides advice and guidance regarding legal issues involving the organization’s work and operations. This includes advising on best ethics practices, legal compliance with applicable laws and advising on risk management. CLC’s General Counsel will also serve as a senior litigator in the Voting Rights & Redistricting programs which engage in litigation around the country, both to ensure the constitutional implementation of existing laws and to defend new reforms against legal challenges. CLC also participates in trial and appellate cases through friend-of-the-court briefs, engages in educational efforts (such as know-your-rights trainings) and provides legislative drafting assistance to legislatures and organizations seeking to improve election law. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Inside Sales Representative, Runbeck — to support our desired growth and market expansion, we continue to hire outstanding talent in multiple departments. We are looking for highly motivated, dedicated and talented individuals who will be able to contribute significantly to the success of the company while receiving great opportunities for professional growth and financial benefits. Responsibilities include: Contact potential or existing customers to inform them about a product or service; ability to present solution and its value to a prospect over the phone; answer questions about products or the company; ask questions to understand customer requirements and close sales; enter and update customer information in the database; keep records of calls and sale and note useful information in the CRM; process orders in an accurate manner; and go the “extra mile” to meet sales quota and facilitate future sales. Application: In order to apply, please send a resume to Tammy White: twhite@runbeck.net.

Program Manager, Overseas Voting Initiative, Council of State Governments — the Program Manager of CSG’s Overseas Voting Initiative, funded through a cooperative agreement with the US Dept. of Defense (DOD) Federal Voting Assistance Program (FVAP), provides day-to-day management and oversight of the Initiative, including research and policy analysis of electronic absentee voting systems for military voters, and development and dissemination of educational policy programming and deliverables to state leaders in support of the cooperative agreement. The Program Manager works within CSG’s Center of Innovation and in cooperation with CSG’s policy and executive management teams as well as regional offices, affiliates and members to support, monitor and improve state elections processes for military and overseas voters. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Project Manager (Austin, TX) – Hart InterCivic — Hart InterCivic is looking for a project manager to work with our Professional Services Team.  The project manager oversees the deployment of voting systems and training to both existing and new Hart customers. The ideal candidate has experience in the elections industry, is PMP certified, and is motivated to achieve success for our customers with initiative.  Travel up to 80 percent. Reports to the Manager of Professional Services. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Regional Sales Manager, Clear Ballot— The Regional Sales Manager (RSM) position will represent Clear Ballot in a designated territory to engage prospective customers, educate them on the value of partnering with Clear Ballot, and close New Business. This position is a Hunter. The RSM will be responsible for managing and growing their assigned territory and meeting quarterly and annual sales goals. Previous sales experience in high growth organizations is a plus. RSM’s will be responsible for understanding the Clear Ballot portfolio and effectively communicating the value we bring to the market. Measures of success include: high levels of sales activity, regular and consistent reporting and communication of progress, progress toward quarterly and annual quota attainment, and overcoming obstacles to get the job done. We currently have open positions in Florida and Boston. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Sales Engineer, Clear Ballot — Our Sales and Marketing team is looking for a seasoned, hardworking and energetic Sales Engineer with proven experience and a passion for selling technology solutions. This role is responsible for being the primary technical resource for our sales force while also actively driving and managing the technology evaluation stage of the sales process. You will be required to have an in-depth technical knowledge of Clear Ballot’s Clear Vote suite and demonstrating the product capabilities to prospective customers. The ideal candidate must also be able to identify and provide reliable solutions for all technical issues to assure complete customer satisfaction. Measures of success include new customer acquisition rates, renewal rates, upselling, cross-selling, customer satisfaction and contribution to overall sales team and new customer success Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Senior Level Software Developer, BPro — We are a well-established small business that has been developing requirements and producing software for the needs of state governments since 1985 and continue to maintain and upgrade many of those systems. We have offices in Pierre, South Dakota, Fargo, North Dakota, Minnesota & Virginia. We’re currently looking for an energetic and intelligent .Net Developer to join our growing team. Our ideal candidate is one who loves to learn, enjoys working as a team, and who can multitask and meet deadlines. Skills required: .NET, VB, VBA, ASP, SQL, HTML, and JavaScript. A four-year college degree is the minimum educational requirement. All applicants must have excellent written and verbal communications skills. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Senior Researcher, Public Policy Evaluation Research, Fors Marsh Group — FMG is hiring for a researcher on the Public Policy Evaluation team which serves to address public concerns and promote the quality of the community. This is done through a) articulating the public’s needs, b) conducting rigorous evaluation to assess how these needs are being met, and c) working with our clients to improve these programs and policies. This job is best suited for an individual who enjoys research, has experience leading research team, possesses excellent attention to detail, continuously strives to learn and develop, and prefers working in a cooperative environment. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Senior Software Developer, Runbeck— Runbeck Election Services is looking for full stack enthusiasts who are comfortable tackling end-to-end and enjoy building products that solve big problems and delight customers. We’re a collaborative team who knows how to get things done (Lone Rangers need not apply). We believe that small teams focused on shipping software move the fastest and make the most impact. The ideal candidate for this position has extensive back end skills (C#, MVC, ASP.Net, SQL Server) paired with solid web and desktop skills (IIS, JavaScript, HTML 5, CSS, jQuery, WPF, Win Forms). Must have a solid grasp of our basic toolset (Jira, Visual Studio). Willing to learn new plug-ins and IDE enhancements in order to boost your productivity and are excited to introduce us to new tooling experiences that have worked for you in the past. You bring discipline and care about implementation practices. You are familiar with Agile/Scrum processes, practice common design patterns, embrace clean coding principles, and employ many other techniques in an effort to bring a high level of software craftsmanship to your finished product. Application: In order to apply, please send a resume to Tammy White: twhite@runbeck.net.

Software Product Specialist II (Phoenix, AZ) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Software Product Specialist II to join our team in Phoenix, AZ! This position will be responsible for delivering a wide variety of technical and non-technical customer support services related to the implementation, operation, repair, maintenance and upgrades of Dominion Voting Systems technology products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Staff Editor, Brennan Center for Justice— the Brennan Center seeks an experienced and confident Staff Editor to play a key role in our growing editorial team. The Staff Editor will work closely with the Director of Editorial Strategy in shaping the Brennan Center’s revamped online content strategy, ensuring that we respond quickly to news developments and helping to position us as a leading voice on the issues of democracy and the Constitution that are currently at the center of the national conversation. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Systems Engineer, Clear Ballot — We are looking for a talented Systems Engineer who has both a technical and services/support background which enables them to quickly assess customer needs and offer value to Clear Ballot’s customers. The Systems Engineer will gain a deep understanding of how Clear Ballot’s products operate and their optimal configuration to build a streamlined installation process of the Clear Vote election system. The ideal candidate for this position can prioritize mission critical tasks and coordinate the implementation and expansion of our systems. They will be able to work directly with customers, display innovation, think conceptually and act tactically to build consensus around system installation and enhancement and meet deadlines. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Training Associate, Center for Technology in Civic Life — When you think about elections, you might think about popular candidates, “I voted” stickers, and all sorts of paperwork and deadlines. But behind the scenes are thousands of election officials in state and local governments who are working hard to make sure ballots are counted and voices are heard. To serve every community and make democracy work, these officials need 21st-century tools and training. You can help them get it! As the CTCL Government Services Training Associate, you will develop and deliver training courses that advance the tech and communication skills of election officials. If you care about democracy, if you believe in the importance of public service, and if you love to exceed expectations, this is the job for you. Salary: $45K-$50K. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Marketplace

electionline provides no guarantees as to the quality of the items being sold and the accuracy of the information provided about the sale items in the Marketplace. Ads are provided directly by sellers and are not verified by electionline. If you have an ad for Marketplace, please email it to: mmoretti@electionline.org

Voting Booths
Each aluminum briefcase contains the following: aluminum legs, privacy shield, writing base, light assembly. All units are in great shape dimensions are 22”x 18”x 3“. MFG: ESL. Election supplies Limited, Napa California. Quantity: 400 Price per unit is $50. Contact Greg Larson 408.569.1004

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In Focus This Week

November 6, 2018

November 6, 2018

Election Day Dispatches 2018

It’s Election Day in America and your electionline team will be with you throughout the day providing updates and posting all the news that’s fit to post.

There’s a lot of news to cover this year from cybersecurity to weather to turn and beyond, so if we miss something that you think is relevant, please email us (mmoretti@electionline.org) or send us a Tweet @electionline and we’ll get it posted.

We’ll be providing updates all day, but look for them around 9:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m., 4 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. Depending on how things are going, we may do additional postings.

If there’s breaking news, we’ll update this site as quickly as possible and you can always check on Twitter @electionline

Our first batch of stories are up where they usually are in the Daily News section of our site, so check there to get all your early morning news. And check out our most recent edition of electionline Weekly where we talk about the 10 things we’ll be watching today…in addition to everything else!

Good luck! And may the democracy gods have mercy on our souls.

9:20 a.m. Update

Polls are open with lines and some malfunctions

Polls are now open throughout a large portion of the nation. There are reports about lines due to heavy turnout and there are some early morning issues.

In Gwinnett County, Georgia, which had already seen its fair share of issues during early voting, the voting machines are down at one polling place leaving hundreds of voters to wait.

Several pollings sites in Maricopa County, Arizona opened late and were having issues. In Chandler, the polling place opened late because the landlord had locked the building overnight.

In Ohio, several polling places were without power, but generators were making it possible for the voting to continue.

Voters in polling places in Virginia and Kentucky were initially given the wrong ballots.

When voters arrived at one voting site in Detroit, there were not voting machines to be found. It turns out they were locked in a closet.

We’ll be back in a few hours when the whole country will be voting. Please note that the links we list are live when we list them. Sometimes media outlets continuously update stories throughout the day, so if what you’re looking for isn’t there when you click, the link, scroll down.

And as always, if we’ve missed something let us know mmoretti@electionline.org

National News: Today’s the biggest test for election security | How several states prepare for severe weather, power outages during an election

Arizona: Chandler polling place experiences problems | Maricopa Co. Recorder: Some polling places experiencing problems | Landlord locked Chandler voting site

Connecticut: Heavy morning turnout | Long lines at polls

Florida: Some voters heading to the wrong precinct | People line up in South Florida

Georgia: Long lines at the polls | Voting lines form | Machines down, hundreds wait at one Gwinnett location

Idaho: County braces for turnout, orders extra ballots

Illinois: Polls open in Chicago and across Illinois

Iowa: What’s different at your polling place this year?

Louisiana: Registrar of Voters: All precincts open despite televised reports

Kentucky: Wrong ballots handed out at Owensboro polling place

Michigan: Voters turned away due to missing voting machines

Mississippi: Long lines of voters in Harrison Co.

Missouri: Long lines in St. Louis area

New Jersey: Strong early turnout

New York: Election Day Problems: Reports of broken machines, long lines | Sloppy start on Election Day

Ohio: Problems reported at local precincts | Two polling places without power after crash | Power outages causes delays for some Dublin area voters | Voting issues at Hawkins Elementary | Dublin polling place without power, voting continues | Officials monitoring reported problems in Lucas Co.

Oklahoma: Polling places are now open through Oklahoma

Pennsylvania: Strong early turnout | Voters forced to wait at Squirrel Hill polling place | Polls open with steady stream of voters

South Carolina: Voting issues on Election Day

Tennessee: Severe weather causes disruptions to voting

Texas: It’s Election Day in Tarrant Co. and turnout shows no signs of slowing down| Voting officials under scrutiny amid heavy turnout

Utah: Election Day arrives–but more than 600K Utahns have already voted

Virginia: Wrong ballots sent to Chesapeake precinct | Charlottesville and Albemarle see heavy turnout

West Virginia: Wood Co. polling location changed

Wisconsin: Columbia Co. stocks up on extra ballots

11 a.m. Update

Traffic, long lines, machine malfunctions and a gunman

Americans from coast to coast are now casting ballots as Election 2018 is in full swing.

The police had to be called to a Greenwich, Connecticut polling place after issues arose over parking.

One polling place in Palm Bay, Florida was on lockdown following reports of a gunmanin the area.

Supervisor of Elections Lori Scott told Florida Today her office received word before 9 a.m. that a person was seen in the parking lot, sitting in a car with a gun in his lap. He did not brandish the weapon, she was told.

“He didn’t get out of the car and drove off,” she said. “Palm Bay police did a traffic stop and he was taken into custody … we’re not sure what prompted that.”

We on the East Coast have a fondness for saying, it’s not the heat, it’s the humidity and for voters in Wake County, North Carolina that’s certainly been the case this morning as the humidity as caused issues with voting machines.

Although it’s still early in the day, commissioners in Porter County, Indiana are calling for polling places to remain open late tonight after there were issues getting up and running this morning.

Weather has knocked out power to at least three polling places in Knox County, Tennessee. Voters are still casting ballots on paper, but the move to paper means those ballots won’t be counted until later in the week.

We’ll be back in a few hours. Please note that the links we list are live when we list them. Sometimes media outlets continuously update stories throughout the day, so if what you’re looking for isn’t there when you click, the link, scroll down.

National News: Oops, we forgot to plug in the voting machine | No, ICE will not be stationed at polling places | Google Doodle encourages voters to Go Vote | Students across the U.S. walk out to vote in midterms |

Alabama: Voter turnout heavy at some sites |

Arizona: After heavy early voting, Election Day starts with some bumps in the road

Connecticut: Police resolved crush at GHS after voters couldn’t find parking

Florida: South St. Pete polling place has glitch | Long lines, huge turnout for Election Day | Gunman causes alarm, brief closure of Palm Bay voting precinct

Georgia: Gwinnett officials experience problems at 4 polling locations

Idaho: Idaho sticks with paper ballots on voting day

Illinois: Dead voters, dirty tricks. Fighting voter fraud

Indiana: Porter Co. commissioners call for polls to remain open late

Kansas: As Dodge City voting gets underway, complaints are few | ‘A strong turnout’ in Sedgwick Co.

Maryland: Pouring rain, glitches greet Maryland voters

Michigan: Small snags hit polling places in Genesee Co. | Lansing City Clerk: No polling places affected by power outage

New York: As historic election begins, scattered voting problems reported | Why am I not getting an ‘I Voted’ sticker? | Polling problems at some NYC precincts

North Carolina: Humidity causing problems for Wake Co. voting machines

Ohio: Hamilton Co. voter scanner machine may cause confusion, but not a glitch

Pennsylvania: Problems reported at polling places | Squirrel Hill polling site opens late due to election judge suffering medical emergency

South Carolina: Election officials respond to machine malfunctions | Long lines at some polling places across Florence Co. | Election officials respond to machine malfunctions after voter complaints | Several Horry Co. residents report problems at the polls

Tennessee: 1 Shelby Co. voting site opens late | Paper ballots in use in 3 Knox polling places, won’t be counted till Friday

Texas: Border Patrol to conduct crowd control exercise in El Paso on Election Day | Why the ‘I Voted’ stickers are so popular | Polls are open, but some locations having technical difficulties

1:30 p.m. Update

Power outages, bomb threats and machine malfunctions

Power outages continue to hamper, although not stop voting across the country as severe weather makes its way through. Most voters are still able to cast their ballots on paper.

Polling places in South Carolina and Florida reported problems with elevators making it difficult for voters with disabilities to get to the voting room.

Voters in Houston, Texas, which had already seen record turnout during early voting are facing long lines on Election Day due to technical difficulties at numerous polling places.

In Washington County, Pennsylvania, not to far from Pittsburgh, a man was arrested for threatening to shoot up a polling place. Across the state in York County, voting was delayed for about 10-15 minutes after someone told voters there was a bomb in the building.

And a special shout-out the the D.C. Board of Elections for another smooth voting experience, which we just did!

We’ll be back in a few hours. Please note that the links we list are live when we list them. Sometimes media outlets continuously update stories throughout the day, so if what you’re looking for isn’t there when you click, the link, scroll down.

National News: Voting waiting times staggering as machines not working in some states | Voter help hotline busiest in decades | Midterm election voters disappointed by lack of ‘I Voted’ stickers | Reports of long lines and broken machines as voters head to the polls

Alabama: Jammed voting machines, cell phone bans and other Election Day issues

Connecticut: Some polling places report slight issues

Florida: Shell point precinct has brief issue with elevator

Georgia: Long lines, issues reported across Atlanta

Indiana: Tippecanoe Co. will not extend voting hours | Oakbrook Church, KHS vote centers lose power |

Kansas: Power outage at Platte Co. location

Kentucky: Locked ballot box causes issues at polling precinct

Louisiana: No serious problems seen

Maine: Polling places packed with voters | Secretary of state Matt Dunlap visits polling places

Massachusetts: 107-year-old at polling place: Get out there and vote | Faulty voting machine replaced in Falmouth | ‘I Voted’ sticker are a hot commodity

Michigan: Husband and wife duo have worked so many elections they’ve lost count | Crews restore power to polling places | Voters stalled, turned away from malfunctioning machines

Missouri: Voting machine malfunctions in Clay Co. | Some Kansas City voters wait two hours to cast their ballot | Ballot scanner problem; Voters feel uneasy leaving ballots in a pile

Montana: Missoula voters should allow extra time at four locations

Nevada: Problems reported at several polling locations

New York: Ballot scanner breakdowns plague NYC polling places | Voting machines get mixed up in Westchester

North Carolina: Humidity causes issues in Wake, other NC counties

North Dakota: Tribes scrambling to print new IDs

Ohio: Why the voting machine spit out your ballot in Hamilton Co. | Computer issues force some to cast paper ballots |

Oklahoma: Minor issues reported at some polling places

Pennsylvania: Voters brave long lines, rain to make statements | Philly voters report broken voting booths, long lines | Voting problems, only a few, easily fixed | Voting problems reported in Pittsburgh area | Man arrested after threatening to shoot up polling place | Person hit by car outside of polling place dies | Confusion on where to vote in Bethleham Twp. | Bomb threat delays voting in York Co.

Rhode Island: Voting machine on Prudence Island replaced

South Carolina: Voting machine problem in Richland Co. causing ‘mismarking’ | Elevator broken at Hattiesburg precinct

Tennessee: Power outages force some TN polling places to use paper ballots

Texas: Voters report election day problems in Houston | Some issues reported at two DFW polling places | Long lines, difficulties reported at many Houston sites | Voters rattled as power outage knocks out some machines

Virginia: Roanoke Co. using paper ballots | Power outage doesn’t deter voters

West Virginia: Precincts battle severe weather on Election Day

3:15 p.m. Update

ID issues, polling places forced to stay open late and PUPPIES!

There have been lots of crazy stories today, but we now want to bring you the best story of the day! The Arizona Humane Society is bringing adoptable puppies to polling places for voters to hold while waiting in line.

“What better way to relieve the stress of voting and the long lines than with adorable, adoptable puppies from the Arizona Humane Society,” Kelsey Dickerson with the AHS told Arizona Family.

Several polling places in Monroe County, Indiana ran out of ballots when turnout proved to be greater than anticipated.

Monroe County Clerk Nicole Browne says her office is quickly printing and delivering more ballots as needed.

Browne says they planned for slightly above the 2014 midterm turnout, which was 26 percent. But as of 2 p.m., turnout is already up to 41.9 percent.

“We could never have anticipated this,” Browne told Indiana Public Media.

In Missouri, where the state’s voter ID law under litigation until just about the last minute, observers noted that voters were being told they had to have a photo ID in order to vote although a judge’s late ruling said they do not

The speaker of the New York City Council has called for the resignation of the city’s Board of Elections executive after a morning plagued with problems lead to long lines at many Gotham polling sites

“Every election is like Groundhog Day: long lines, polling site issues, huge problems. Now we’re blaming the weather? It’s unacceptable & unfair to voters. Michael Ryan should resign & we should begin a top to bottom review of how this happened. It’s time for new leadership at BOE” Speaker Corey Johnson said in a tweet.

And we’ve had a topless voter in Tennessee.

We’ll be back in a few hours. Please note that the links we list are live when we list them. Sometimes media outlets continuously update stories throughout the day, so if what you’re looking for isn’t there when you click, the link, scroll down.

National News: Voters face long lines, machine snafus, ‘mosh pit’ crowds

Arizona: Meet the polling place puppies

California: San Diego Co. registrar allows voters to easily find their polling places | Voters report sporadic problems at polling places around Los Angeles | Why do we get ‘I Voted’ stickers?

Delaware: Big turnout, voter ID confusion, rain highlights first half of Election Day

District of Columbia: Eastern Market voting machine breaks causing delays

Florida: State says Election Day starts smoothly | Precinct in Sarasota Co. opens without proper ballots | Security guards block access to polling place inside gated community | NAACP demands polling sites be available to hurricane victims

Georgia: Reports of long lines and machine malfunctions | Gwinnett voting machines problem fixed, but long lines persist | In predominantly black Atlanta neighborhoods, voters say there aren’t enough machines | Crowds fill Atlanta polling places

Indiana: Several Monroe polling places run out of ballots as turnout soars | 12 polling places to stay open late

Kansas: Ford Co. officials report voting going smoothly | Dodge City voters cast their ballots at new location 

Kentucky: Knott Co. polling station starts Election Day with issues

Massachusetts: Election monitors report few problems so far | ‘Election Day is like throwing a party for 5,300 people’

Maryland: Harford election directors put on leave, interim director in place | Probably faster and more efficient than any vote we’ve had

Michigan: Voters stalled, turned away by malfunctioning machines | Houghton Co. Clerk: Some voters thought they were registered to vote online

Minnesota: More than 615K absentee ballots received

Missouri: A dozen ballot counting machines down in Clay Co. | Voters report confusion at the polls due to voter ID law | ‘One ballot every second’

New Jersey: New law in NJ causes confusion for voters | It’s raining voters

New York: Wet ballots cause problems in New York City |  Long lines greet some voters | No ‘I Voted’ stickers at the polls | Council speaker calls for resignation of NYC BOE exec

North Carolina: Malfunctioning machines create problems in Forsyth Co. | Poll worker has helped with ballots since 1950 | Voting period may be extended in Gastonia

Ohio: Power outage affects 5 polling places | Voting continues after Jefferson Twp. power outage

Pennsylvania: Haverford College’s new voting site draws strong crowd | At least 100 voters in Phoenixville receive wrong ballot

Rhode Island: Rhode Islanders wait in long lines to cast their ballots

South Carolina: Voters say machines flipped their votes | ‘Check your ballot’

Tennessee: Man not allowed to wear Trump t-shirt votes topless | Back up generator fails at Knox Co. polling location

Texas: Polling place problems being resolved | Voting computer ‘locks up’, no one turned away

Virginia: Officials report robust turnout, lines

Wisconsin: Misprinted ballots give to at least 54 in Stratford

5 p.m. Update

Voter ID issues in North Dakota, violence at the polls and Jack McCoy

Some Native American voters experienced problems with North Dakota’s new voter ID law. According to The Associated Press, State Elections Director John Arnold says he hasn’t heard of any widespread problems at reservation polling sites. But Professor Carla Fredericks with the University of Colorado’s American Indian Law Clinic says dozens and perhaps hundreds of American Indians are having issues with the state’s recently tightened voter identification laws.

According to The Associated Press, a Harris County, Texas deputy has cited a poll worker for misdemeanor assault after she allegedly bumped a voter during an argument and made a racist comment. The Harris County Sheriff’s Office said on Twitter the deputy responded Tuesday morning to a disturbance call at a polling site in Houston.

A poll worker in Winston-Salem, North Carolina was assaulted by a voter this morning. According to a local television, it’s unclear what lead to the altercation.

In California, one polling place in San Diego County received an incomplete polling book affecting about 46 voters.

Due to budgetary constraints, voters in Louisiana did not get “I Voted” stickers this election cycle. In 2016, the Louisiana stickers featuring Blue Dog became quite the internet sensation.

And some voters in Connecticut got a ride to the polls from New York City District Attorney Jack McCoy…oh wait, we mean actor Sam Waterston.

We’ll be back in a few hours. Please note that the links we list are live when we list them. Sometimes media outlets continuously update stories throughout the day, so if what you’re looking for isn’t there when you click, the link, scroll down.

National News: DHS watching for any problems with voting machines | ‘I had been taking my right to vote for granted’ New voters reflect on Election Day | Why are long lines at polling places not a voting rights issue?

Alabama: Madison Co. voting machines having problems counting votes

Alaska: Anchorage election officials forgets ballots at home

Arizona: Glitches and long lines don’t deter these young voters

Arkansas: Some voters given incorrect ballots in Little Rock | Flu shots offered on Election Day

California: Voting machine issues reported throughout LA County | San Diego Co. polls open smoothly; mail-in ballots higher than expected | Dozens of San Diegans left off voters rolls

Connecticut: Law & Order actor gives voters rides to the polls

Georgia: Chatham Co. polling places see long lines, possible voting issues | Gwinnett plagued with Election Day problems including forgotten chords | Jesse Jackson: Issue at Fulton polling site was ‘classic voter suppression’

Illinois: Reports of broken machines, long lines in DuPage Co. | Chicago could extend voting at least 5 places | County clerk gets more time with border collie

Indiana: Temporary glitch causes slowdown in Elkhart Co. | Some Northwest Indiana polling places to remain open late | Republicans ask judge to reconsider his ruling that 12 sites stay open

Kansas: With no polling place in this town, Latino voters still turnout

Kentucky: Machine glitch quickly fixed

Louisiana: No ‘I Voted’ sticker for Louisiana voters

Maryland: Voters weather steady rain, ballot problems

Massachusetts: Monitors report mostly smooth Election Day so far | Despite hours-long lines at 2 Boston polls, voting going smoothly

Michigan: High turnout at Lansing area polling places

Minnesota: Under steady drizzle, voters line up to have their say

New Hampshire: Pedestrian pinned under car outside of polling place

New York: Ballot scanner snafu exasperates voters | New York City purged 200K voters in 2016. It wasn’t a mistake | Driver crashes into parked cars at polling place | Yonkers teen casts ballot despite recovering from stroke | Women are placing their I Voted stickers on Susan B. Anthony’s grave

North Carolina: Humidity stops up some voting machines in Cumberland Co. | Some voters scramble to find new polling place | Poll worker assaulted by voter in Winston-Salem

North Dakota: ID problems for some Native Americans

Pennsylvania: Line of voters greet Hamburg poll worker | Machine issues, tension in Hazelton

Tennessee: Voters wait two hours in Antioch

Texas: Election officials blame problems on ‘operator error’ | Border Patrol postpones training exercise | Texas poll worker cited with misdemeanor assault

U.S. Virgin Islands: VI voters swarming to the polls

Wisconsin: Dane Co. turnout hits 50% at 2pm

7 p.m. Update

Sticker shortage, long waits and late nights

Polls have begun to close on the East Coast, but there are still hours to go on the West Coast (and in Alaska and Hawaii).

A voting rights group in Ohio filed a lawsuit seeking to allow those in police custody the ability vote. The suit was filed in the Southern District Court of Ohio and alleged violations of the 1st and 14th Amendments.

A motorist crashed into a Bakersfield polling place and ran away, prompting police to lock down voting, reported The Bakersfield Californian. Elections officials asked voters to avoid the site and vote at another polling place.

Lots of reports of voters being disappointed because they didn’t get an “I Voted” sticker, but one illustrator on Twitter is making them for people, so that’s cool!

We’ll be back one last time in an hour or so. Please note that the links we list are live when we list them. Sometimes media outlets continuously update stories throughout the day, so if what you’re looking for isn’t there when you click, the link, scroll down.

National News: On Election Day voting problems appear across the country | People who can’t get their hands on ‘I Voted’ sticker are utterly disappointed | This illustrator’s making hand-drawn ‘I Voted’ stickers for people on Twitter

California: Voters report some names missing at polling places | 2-hour wait at LA County voting site | Ballot error, polling place lockdown. Here’s the latest

Colorado: Despite mail ballots, some voters still appreciate the allure of the polling place

Florida: Melbourne man threatens to blow up supervisor of elections office | State asked to investigate Lake Park voting complaints

Indiana: Polling place problems brings judges order to stay open past 6pm | Technology problems repaired, voting won’t be extended

Iowa: Secretary of state says recounts may be necessary

Kentucky: 30 extra voting machines sent to Lexington

Louisiana: No ‘I Voted’ sticker? Secretary of state blames budget

Maryland: Two-hour wait reported at Clinton polling site

Massachusetts: Broken voting machines, long lines reported in Mass

Michigan: Local clerks report high turnout

Missouri: Confusion over voter ID leads to polling lines

Montana: Missoula, Gallatin counties report increase in provisional ballots

New Jersey: Gloucester Co. tries new voting machines | Somerset Co. polling place opens an hour late

New Mexico: Big turnout reported at Bernalillo Co. vote centers

New York: Election Day Angst: Voting machines crash all over New York | Board of elections explains problems with voting

North Carolina: Heavy turnout as voters question ‘inactive’ status | Power goes out at Apex polls, but voting continues | Severe weather is knocking out power to polling places

Ohio: Voting rights groups file lawsuit requesting that those in police custody be allowed to vote

Oklahoma: Ballot scanner problem fixed in Oklahoma City

Pennsylvania: Voting machine problems confirmed in Luzerne Co. | Calibration problems reported in Irwin | Voting delayed in Taylor precinct | Wait times pile up at several polling locations | High turnout, no major issues reported in York Co. | These ‘I Voted’ stickers are so Philly | ACLU concerned about county’s handling of absentee ballots

South Carolina: Richland Co. says review your ballots | Election officials respond to machine issues

Texas: Students rally for voting rights at Texas’ oldest HBCU | Turned away twice, Dallas teacher fought back and then voted | Poll hours extended in some areas | Tarrant Co. voters overcome minor setbacks at polls | Travis Co. voting website crashes

West Virginia: Polling places move past power outage problems

8:30 p.m. Update

Closing time, 911, CPR and GOATS!

Polls are now closed on the East Coast–except where they’ve been ordered to stay open. This will be our last post for the evening, but we’ll be back bright and early tomorrow morning (around 6 a.m.) with the Daily News.

In South Carolina, a woman waited so long for curbside voting that she called 911 for help.

Voters in Georgia have filed a last-minute lawsuit seeking to prevent Secretary of State Brian Kemp (R), who is also a candidate for governor, from overseeing the counting and results process.

Washington, D.C. poll workers and voters rushed to save a man suffering from cardiac arrest while waiting to cast his ballot. Along with the help of a 911 operator and the use of an automated external defibrillator (AED), a group of bystanders and poll workers teamed up to administer CPR and save the man’s life, WJLA reported.

“He didn’t get to vote, but he got to live,” D.C. Fire and EMS tweeted.

Elections might seem like a zoo to some, but in Central Wisconsin they took that heart when on polling place also hosted a petting zoo featuring GOATS!

And we’re gonna end on a high note (GOATS)! Stick a fork in us, we’re done…till tomorrow morning!

National News: No Russian hacking, but plenty of voting problems | Judges rule to keep some polling sites open |

Alaska:  Alaska’s ‘I Voted’ stickers are way cooler than ours

California: Voter interest high, problems few in California | Costa Mesa voters take city’s new voting system for a spin | Alaska’s ‘I Voted’ stickers are way cooler than ours

District of Columbia: Bystanders save man’s life at polling place

Florida: Controversial church sign angers Pasco voters

Georgia: Polls close across metro, but hours extended in Gwinnett | Voting machine hiccup as Kemp casts his ballot | Judge orders Gwinnett precinct to stay open until 9:25 | Voters file lawsuit seeking to keep Kemp from overseeing election results

Hawaii: Minor voting problems reported in Oahu

Kansas: Ford Co. bars reporters from Dodge City polling place | Some Dodge City Hispanics voting provisionally

Missouri: ‘Why does this happen every single time?’ | High turnout has voting sites running out of polling places | Process moving smoothly amid strong turnout

Montana: Election issues lead to long lines at Butte Civic Center

Nebraska: Locals wonder where they will vote after hall is closed

New York: Elections boss: Voters share part of the blame

Ohio: Complaints of missing, late absentee ballots | Trumbull voters use flashlights in the darkness

Rhode Island: Island’s lone voting machine fails | Portsmouth polling place moved due to gas leak

South Carolina: Woman calls 911 for voting help

Texas: Polling locations experience problems | Polling sites in Laredo experience problems

Utah: Fraud-sniffing dogs?

Virginia: ‘I Voted’ sticker designed by 9-year-old girl

Wisconsin: Polling places in Columbia Co. busy on Election Day | Central Wisconsin polling place luring voters in unique way

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Election Day Dispatches 2018

November 1, 2018

November 1, 2018

In Focus This Week

Election 2018 Preview: What to watch on Election Day
Ten things to watch on November 6

By M. Mindy Moretti
electionline.org

This is it. The end is finally nigh…well at least (we hope) for the 2018 election cycle.

Although millions of voters have already cast their ballots in record number either through early voting, absentee voting or vote-by-mail, millions more will head to the polls on November 6 and cast their ballots in what has become, for a variety of reasons, one of the most watched elections of our time.

It’s been a very busy two years since the last nationwide election to say the least. Federal, state and local officials have spent thousands of hours and dollars beefing up election security. In addition to that, voters will face new laws, new voting machines and new voting sites on Tuesday.

There’s a lot to watch on Tuesday and electionline will be doing Election Dispatches through the day. And while we will not doubt be following everything, these are 10 things we will be paying special attention to.

Good luck and may the gods of democracy have mercy on our souls!

Oh, and as Agatha Christie said in Death Comes at the End, “Sometimes what you think is an end is only a beginning.” November 3, 2020 is only 728 days away!

Election Security —While all eyes are already on the midterms in anticipation of the outcome, everyone will also be keeping a very close on election security. Counties and states have worked tirelessly since the 2016 to bolster their election security, especially cybersecurity. Will it be enough? Also on the security front, tempers are running high in America and there have already been several instances of minor violence and intimidation at early voting sites, will everyone remain calm on Election Day?

Voter Registration —Hundreds of thousands (millions?) of people registered to vote in the waning days of the 2018 election cycle. Some counties struggled to get the voter registrations processed before early voting began. Come Election Day, will all those registrations be processed and voters find their names on the rolls? And in Georgia, will the thousands of suspended voters be able to cast their ballots without issue?

Voter ID — Issues with voter ID arise every election, but this year, Iowa and Missouri will see the first, large-scale, statewide roll out of their voter ID laws. Missouri’s was mired in litigation till about two weeks before the election. Are poll workers prepared to know what to ask for? Are voters prepared to show the required IDs? And in North Dakota, after the U.S. Supreme Court failed to take up the case, the state’s voter ID law, which requires a valid street address is on the books. Many Native Americans living on reservations may be impacted. Will they get the necessary ID in time?

Turnout — Americans have turned out in record numbers for early voting this year. Will that impact overall turnout? Will voters turnout in record — for a midterm — numbers on Election Day as well? Are elections officials prepared for crowds? Will there be lines? Will polls have to stay open late?

Displaced Voters — Voters in several states, including North Carolina, Florida and Texas are displaced from their homes due to natural disasters. While the voters in Texas have been displaced for a year now, the displacement only recently occurred in North Carolina, Florida, Georgia and other states. Will these displaced voters be able to cast a ballot? Will they face issues if they show up at their designated polling places on Election Day? How will the counties in the Florida Panhandle, especially Bay County, pull off Election Day?

New Machines/Technology — Thousands of voters will be using new voting machines for the first time this election. Are voters and poll workers ready? Will this slow down or speed up the process of casting ballots? Will the voting booth technology help speed up election night? Some voters encountered problems with electronic voting machines during early voting, will those problems persist? Additionally, jurisdictions in several states are using e-poll books for the first time. How will roll out go?

Litigation — It seems like, in the lead up to the 2018 midterm election, there was a lawsuit filed almost every day. From polling place location to voter ID, to absentee ballot acceptance. Will all these suits be settled by Tuesday and if so what impact may they have? Will more lawsuits be filed as a results of Tuesdays’ process or outcomes?

Secretary of State Races — There are 24 secretary of state seats up for grabs this election cycle with eight of those being open seats. In addition to those 24 seats, there are several governor’s races that may determine the future of the state’s election authority.

Ballot Measures — As we reported a few weeks ago, there are eight statewide ballot measures that will cover voter ID, ballot harvesting, election-day registration, automatic voter registration, citizens-only voting, ex-felon voting, and no-excuse absentee voting. There will also be at least 10 local elections-related measures covering everything from voting rights for 16-year-olds, approval voting, instant runoff voting and non-citizen voting.

Vote by Mail — More and more people are choosing to cast their ballot via mail. Will those ballots get to elections officials on time? Will there be issues with signature matches? How long will processing and counting all those ballots take?

And finally there are the unknown unknowns.

As Former Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld said back in 2002,  “But there are also unknown unknowns – the ones we don’t know we don’t know. And if one looks throughout the history of our country and other free countries, it is the latter category that tend to be the difficult ones.” There are things that may happen on Election Day that no one could anticipate happening and elections officials live by the unknown unknowns rule. Will there be any unknown unknowns on Election Day 2018 and if so, what impact may they have and at what level?

 

ADA Compliance at the Polls

ADA Compliance at the Polls
What Everyone Needs to Know about Accessible Elections and Voters’ Rights

Tammy Patrick, Senior Advisor to Democracy Fund’s Election Program
Michelle Bishop, Disability Advocacy Specialist for Voting Rights at the National Disability Rights Network (NDRN)

With more voting options than ever before—early voting centers, in-person absentee, and postal delivery of ballots—millions of Americans have already weighed in on the 2018 midterm elections. It is certainly an exciting time and we’re inspired by the work that elections officials, administrators, and poll workers across the country are doing to ensure that our elections systems are secure, and that all votes are counted accurately.

At the Bipartisan Policy Center’s recent Are We Ready to Run Our Elections? event, Matt Masterson, Director of the Election Task Force (ETF) at the Department of Homeland Security, raised an important point about accessibility, stating: “if our systems aren’t accessible to eligible voters, there is great insecurity in that.” So, let’s look at what election officials can and should be doing to make certain that polling places are accessible, and what voters need to know about their rights.

ADA Compliant Election Administration
The vote is the one right on which all our other rights depend, and equal access to that vote is vital for a healthy democracy. At the most basic level, all voters want to be treated equally and allowed the same opportunities to the information and practices offered to their friends, family, and neighbors. Administrators on the front lines of our democracy can be one of the most important  both physical access to election services and information in formats that work for all voters.

The Department of Justice sets federal accessibility standards to specifically aid election officials in making certain that their polling locations are compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The ADA checklist defines what needs to be provided: adequate parking with van access aisles, unimpeded paths, curb-cuts, entrances not requiring use of stairs so that all voters can enter and cast their vote. This checklist for polling places is the gold standard for ensuring polling place accessibility, and its requirements benefit everyone, including older adults, a parent pushing a stroller, or anyone with a temporary injury that requires crutches or a boot. In cases where accessible polling places are difficult to locate, the jurisdiction must either provide remedies such as temporary ramps and propping open manual doors, or alternatives such as curbside voting as part of a comprehensive program to service those voters who face barriers.

This is where instructions to voters and information become critical, and there are resources available like the Center for Civic Design Field Guides. Voters should be apprised of what options they have at the polls. Providing information on official websites, in mailers, and outreach campaigns need to be done in a variety of formats. Many voters utilize assistive software to navigate through websites and election information sites should allow for those interfaces to work effectively by adhering to online accessibility standards. Providing information in large print, Braille, and audio formats also expands the pool of voters who can engage in the process in a meaningful way.

Some of the best programs leverage advocacy networks in the community to help identify challenges voters may face, suggest solutions, and get information out to the electorate. No one knows more about running elections than our elections administrators, but no one knows more about what people with disabilities need than actual people with disabilities. Inviting disability advocacy organizations and voters with disabilities into the election planning process creates new solutions to vexing accessibility problems.

Understanding Voter Rights
As a Commissioner with President Obama’s Presidential Commission on Election Administration (Tammy) and a long-time disability rights advocate taking calls to voter assistance hotlines whenever polls are open (Michelle), we have heard firsthand when voters are being denied their rights at the polls. Too often there are stories of a voter’s competency being challenged, denial of voting assistance by a person of the voter’s choosing, or lack of the ability to cast a private and independent ballot as required by the Help America Vote Act (HAVA). Some fundamental voter rights are outlined below:

  • Voters have the right to request reasonable accommodations in registration and voting. If you are a voter who knows you may need assistance, contact your local election officials in advance to find out what options you have and what you need to do to be certain that services will be available when, and where, you want them.
  • Voters have the right to assistance in voting by someone of their choosing (with a few exceptions). Voters may bring in someone to help them in casting their ballot if that person is not their employer or union representative. You can have someone help you in reading and marking the ballot if you want.
  • Voters have the right to cast their ballot independently and privately. If you don’t want to have someone assist you, you have the right to vote independently and each polling place should be resourced with an assistive voting machine to enable you to do so. This equipment is enabled to present materials in large print, in an audio format, and also to link with many assistive devices like sip-and-puffs and paddles.

In many areas voters also have the right to voting information in an alternative language as prescribed by the Voting Rights Act. Paper ballots and the assistive machines should offer voter instructions and the ballot itself in required alternative language(s).

Americans rely on poll workers to help them understand and navigate election processes. It is important that election staff are trained in the federal and state laws governing assistance and access, but also in some basic protocols. Poll workers often truly do want to be helpful, but may not know how. Training and resources are available on chain of custody of ballots and voting equipment, security seals and locks, ID requirements and eligibility; election officials should also train on how to provide assistance effectively, how to interact with people with disabilities respectfully, and best practices to improve the voting experience.

 

eBenchbook Expands

William & Mary’s Election Law Program eBenchbook expands

Wondering what the Virginia election code has to say about ID at the polls? Want to know how Florida and North Carolina election statutes accommodate hurricanes? Curious how Nevada statutes treat third-party candidates?

In advance of the November 6, 2018 election, the  Election Law Program, a joint project of William & Mary Law School and the National Center for State Courts, is proud to add to its collection of online state election “eBenchbooks” available at https://eBenchbook.wm.edu.

The new update adds Nevada and North Carolina codes to the platform, as well as text-only codes from all remaining states. These additions present users with three stages of eBenchbook development.

The first stage houses just the text of the state election code. The second stage adds browsing menus, a search bar, and supplemental materials to each statute, such as case law and regulations (see Nevada and North Carolina for examples). The final stage “full” eBenchbooks incorporate in-text annotations from a bipartisan group of in-state election experts who annotate state election statutes on an ongoing basis.

These annotations provide context for understanding how election laws operate in Colorado, Florida and  Virginia. To see an example of a fully-annotated statute that includes supplementary materials, click here.

The eBenchbook project strives to make state election law more transparent, provide judges with meaningful context for election statutes, and provide opportunities for election law experts—who often  find themselves on opposite sides in court—to clarify the meaning of state election statutes outside the context of a live election dispute. The eBenchbook project aims to provide a tangible resource to judges hearing election cases and to help journalists and members of the public understand how state election laws operate.

“Election litigation, once a rarity, has become increasingly common since Bush v. Gore. The Election Law Program’s eBenchbook is a welcomed resource for judges deciding election related cases,” explains the Hon. Terry Lewis, a Leon County, Florida circuit judge who played a central role in Bush v. Gore in 2000.

Whether you are a judge, a lawyer, a journalist, or a citizen who wants to know more about the law of  elections, we welcome you to explore the site to see how election laws help to shape the contours of our democracy.

Interested in an eBenchbook for your state? Contact us at ebenchbook@wm.edu for information about  adding your state to this resource.

(William & Mary’s Election Law Program is a grantee of The Democracy Fund.)

Federal-State Updates

Too much of a good thing? Last week, Christopher Krebs, Under Secretary for National Protection and Programs Directorate at the DHS said that elections officials are being inundated with all the free cybersecurity offerings from private companies and those offerings are causing confusion. While Krebs said the free offerings are great, it may be too many too fast, especially at the local level.

“One thing that I am seeing with a lot of these companies offering free services is that the election officials down range are being inundated and they can’t really kinda contextualize this service vs that service, [and] what does it get them,” Krebbs said the Cyberlaw Podcast.

Election News This Week

The Pew Research Center has a new survey out that says 55 percent of respondents said that they were not too or not at all confident that “election systems are secure from hacking and other technological threats.” Additionally, a 67-percent majority said either Russia or other foreign governments will likely attempt to influence various races in the midterm election. Despite their concerns about outside interference, nearly nine-in-ten (89%) have confidence in poll workers in their community to do a good job, and majorities say the same about local and state election officials. The survey of 10,600 adults was conducted between Sept. 24 and Oct. 7.

It may be 2018, but elections officials in Arizona are still working off a state-issued election procedures manual from 2014. According to the Arizona Mirror, Secretary of State Michele Reagan submitted the 500+ page manual in March, but neither Gov. Doug Ducey nor Attorney General Mark Brnovich signed off on the manual. The manual provides guidance on how county elections officials are to conduct elections and execute election-related statutes. Once approved, the manual carries the force of law. Ducey spokesman Daniel Ruiz said the governor’s decision was the result of intense criticism from county recorders, who took issue with a number of the proposed manual’s provisions. He said Ducey was also concerned that there wasn’t enough time left before the election to implement the changes it contained. “Their preference was to retain the manual in its current state,” Ruiz the Mirror.

In North Dakota, tribal activists and leaders are scrambling to get voters who live on the state’s Indian Reservations the necessary ID to vote. “Fifteen dollars for an ID could mean the difference between a single mother buying milk for her children for three days or getting an ID to go vote,” Turtle Mountain Chairman Jamie Azure told The Associated Press. Tribes are handing out free IDs in advance of the election and at polling sites on Election Day. They’re arranging special events, including a recent concert on the Standing Rock Reservation featuring musician Dave Matthews. On Turtle Mountain, about 100 people are coming in for free IDs each day, said Kandace Parisien, director of the tribe’s motor vehicle department, which is issuing them.

In other Native American voting rights news, members of several Nevada-based tribes will have their own voting location come Election Day. In 2016,Pyramid Lake Paiute and Walker River Paiute tribes filed suit against Nevada, Washoe County and Mineral County over the lack of early voting and election day polling sites. A federal judge agreed that not providing the sites was a violation of the National Voting Rights Act. Now those two tribes and nine others will have voting sites. “For the first time in our tribe’s history, our tribal members will have a site on our reservation,” said Stacey Montooth, the community information officer for the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony (RSIC) and a member of the Walker River Paiute Tribe.  “Our leadership understands the importance of the election.” According to the Nevada Current, At the polling site on the Walker River Paiute tribal land, which has about 400 registered voters enrolled in the tribe, people have been enthusiastic. “It’s a big turnout, a lot of people are loving it,” said Shawna Castillo, 35, who is a member of the tribe and a volunteer for the early voting polling site.

Look what you made her do. Last month, pop star Taylor Swift broke her political silence and encouraged her millions of followers on Instagram to register to vote. Several states reported a bump in registration following the post. Now Swift has cast an early ballot in Tennessee and only time will tell if her decision to vote and share it on social media will boost voter turnout.

Personnel News: Longtime Edina, Minnesota City Clerk Deb Mangen will be retiring following the midterms after 23 years on the job. Former Appalachian State University professor Thomas Marvin Williamsen has been sworn in as the new member of the Watauga County, North Carolina Board of Elections. Ron Johnson has been named to the Jackson County, Georgia board of elections.

In Memoriam: Larry Dowd, longtime Miller County, Arkansas election commission chairman has died. He was 72. “He was a very strong leader, he had a very strong belief system, and he worked hard in the election process and in the political arenas, the things that he believed in, the things he wanted to see accomplished,” Former County Clerk Ann Nicholas told the Texarkana Gazette. Dowd told the paper that Miller worked hard to help modernize the county’s elections.  “He went to lots of state training and lots of meetings and was very involved with that. And so he was instrumental in bringing Miller County into the computer age, as far as voter registration and elections are concerned.”

 

Research & Report Summaries

Research and Report Summaries are provided by Sean Greene. Greene has served as the director of research for the U.S. Election Assistance Commission and the Pew Center on the States Election Initiatives. He currently lives in Rome where he is studying Italian, drinking Moretti beer and still paying close attention to the administration of elections in the United States. He’s looking forward to casting his first ballot as a UOCAVA voter.

Understanding the Voter Experience: The Public’s View of Election Administration and Reform – Natalie Adona and Paul Gronke, Democracy Fund, October 2018: This report uses survey data from 2008 – 2016 to examine public opinion related to election administration and reform. It focuses on why people do not vote, how they navigate voter registration, what the voter experience is like, and levels of trust in election officials and the election process.

 

Legislative Updates

New Jersey: A trio of bills to enhance election security have been advanced by the Assembly State and Local Government Committee. The three bills would allow the state to transition to paper ballots, use federal HAVA funds to pay for the new voting machines and encourage Congress to allot more money to purchase voting equipment.

Pennsylvania: Rep. Pam Snyder has introduced House Bill 75 that would allow for no-excuse absentee voting.

Legal Updates

Arizona: The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals has up held a 2106 law banning groups from collecting mail-in ballots from voters and delivering them.

Georgia: U.S. District Court Judge Leigh Martin May has declined to pause an injunction she ordered that changes how Georgia elections officials evaluate certain absentee ballots.

Kansas: The American Civil Liberties Union has filed a federal lawsuit seeking to force Ford County to open a second voting location in Dodge City for the upcoming election.

Louisiana: The state’s High Court has decline to hear the appeal of a ruling allowing the state to deny the right to vote to felons on probation or parole. Chief Justice Bernette Johnson split from her colleagues, calling the law plainly unconstitutional. She acknowledged a law passed this year allowing felons on parole or probation to vote after five years of freedom, but said that law doesn’t go far enough.

Minnesota: Former Moorhead City Council member Mark Altenburg has filed suit against the city alleging that Moorhead violated state law when changes were made to polling places after Dec. 31, 2017. The suit was dismissed for being filed in the wrong jurisdiction.

New Hampshire: On Thursday, a judge brokered a tentative deal over SB3 however on Friday, the state’s Supreme Court ruled that the law will remain in place for the 2018 midterms but let the door open for further litigation after the midterms.

New Jersey: An independent candidate for Bergen County sheriff has filed suit against the county clerk in Superior Court claiming the clerk violated state law by failing to give notice of the public drawing for the ballot order, and has created confusion and bias by putting an unnecessary gap between candidates’ names on the supplemental ballot mailed to residents.

North Dakota: The Native American Rights Fund, on behalf of the Spirit Lake Sioux Tribe has filed a suit against the state arguing that the “provable street address” requirement for voters is unconstitutional. The suit argues that the 911 system of assigning addresses, the state’s solution for those on Reservations is, “incomplete, contradictory and prone to errors on reservations.”

Ohio: By a 2-1 vote, the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled that votes cast by people purged from the rolls between 2011 and 2015 must be counted if they still live in the same county of their last registration and if they are not disqualified from voting because of a felony conviction, mental incapacity or death.

Tennessee: Chancellor JoeDae Jenkins ordered the Shelby County Election Commission to allow voters with incomplete voter registration applications to fix deficiencies and vote regularly on Election Day. According to The Commercial Appeal, it’s a system already being used during early voting, but one the commission has said is unfeasible and even inconsistent with state law if used on Election Day. On Wednesday, the Court of Appeals of Tennessee halted most of the injunction saying that those with incomplete registrations will cast provisionals.

Also in Tennessee, District Judge Thomas Parker has dismissed an effort to have the Department of Security conduct a cybersecurity assessment of Shelby County’s touch-screen voting machines.

Texas: According to The Monitor, The appeal of a judge’s ruling to void the Mission mayoral June runoff will be accelerated, the 13th court of appeals ruled Monday, allowing the case to take precedence. The original case revolves around allegations of illegal vote harvesting.

The Dallas County, GOP has filed a lawsuit targeting an unknown number of mail-in ballots saying that they are likely fraudulent. According to the Dallas Morning News, the reason, Republicans allege in a lawsuit, is that Democratic former state Rep. Terri Hodge, a felon, assisted voters on a large number of absentee ballots.

West Virginia: Jeffrey Hartman, 73 of Westminster, Maryland pleaded guilty to voting illegally in Morgan County, West Virginia.

Tech Thursday

Website Security: A new study by McAffee found that counties in more than a dozen swing states have elections websites that lack basic security measures and are not identified as government related. “We found that large majorities of county websites use top level domain names such as .com, .net and .us rather than the government validated .gov in their web addresses,” the study found after examining 20 swing states. “Our findings essentially revealed that there is no official U.S. governing body validating whether the majority of county websites are legitimately owned by actual legitimate county entities.”

Social Media: Pizza to the Polls uses social media to determine if and where there are lines forming at voting locations and then they will send pizzas to those folks waiting in line to vote. In 2016 the group raised about $40,000 to send pizzas to voters in line.

Digital Assistants: Alexa, tell me where my polling place is. Amazon announced this week that it is beefing up the Alexa’s knowledge base of including where to vote, real-time results, and even explanations of ballot measures. Now you’ll be able to ask Alexa where your polling place is or who’s leading in any particular race, and it’ll respond with a real answer instead of just kicking you to a web search.

Oregon: Oregon Elections Director Steve Trout met with officials from the FBI and Department of Homeland Security this week over a “huge increase” of phishing attempts in the elections office. “I probably had one or two phishing emails last year and I’ve probably had 12 to 15 in the last three or four months,” he told reporters during a news conference on Tuesday. Trout remains confident in the process though. “This election is the most accurate and secure that we’ve ever had in Oregon,” Trout said.

Texas: A group of University of Texas professors enlisted the help of their students to create the BeVote app to help students register to vote, find their polling places and be informed about election information. According to Alcalde, English Professor Hannah Wojciehowski, Associate Professor of Game Development Paul Toprac, and Strass Institute Director Susan Nold decided to find a way to engage students to vote. The trio signed up students in Natural Sciences, the School of Information, Fine Arts, and others to design and program a mobile app to enhance the voting experience for UT students.

Opinions This Week

National Opinions: Student voters | Voting rights, II, III, IV, V, VI | Get out the vote, II, III | White hat hacking | Election Day reform | Native American voters | Election security, II | First time voters | Voter fraud

Alaska: Ranked choice voting

California: San Mateo County

Colorado: Secretary of state race, II, III, IV, V

Connecticut: Election Day registration

Delaware: Paper ballots

Florida: Ex-felon voting rights, II, III

Georgia: Absentee ballots | Get out the vote | Secretary of state race | Voter suppression

Illinois: Sangamon County

Iowa: Linn County

Kansas: Kris Kobach | Election reform

Kentucky: Election reform, II

Louisiana: Voter fraud | Secretary of state race

Maine: Ranked choice voting

Maryland: Get out the vote | Election Day registration

Massachusetts: Secretary of state race, II

Michigan: Election reform, II

Missouri: Voter access | Early voting

Montana: Ballot mailer | Secretary of state’s office

Nebraska: Vote-by-mail

New Mexico: Native American turnout

North Carolina: State board of elections, II | Polling places

North Dakota: Secretary of state race

Oregon: Lane County

Pennsylvania: Ex-felon voting rights | Election reform

South Carolina: Election reform | Voter access

Texas: Early voting problems | Polling place decorum | Waller County

Vermont: Election Day | Election system

Virginia: Student voters | Election security

Clearie Awards Deadline Extended

EAC Extends Deadline for Third Annual Competition for Best Practices in Election Administration

The U.S. Election Assistance Commission (EAC) has extended the deadline for submissions for its third annual “Clearie” awards, a national competition for best practices in election administration, until Friday, November 30, 2018. This year, the Commission will present awards in the categories of best practices related to voting accessibility, outstanding innovations in elections, and recruiting, training and retaining election workers. All entries must be received no later than Friday, November 30, 2018.

This year, the Clearie awards are dedicated the life and legacy of Wendy Noren and R. Brian Lewis. Wendy Noren served as Boone County Clerk for over three decades and was a member of the EAC’s Board of Advisors before passing away in July 2018 following a long battle with cancer. R. Brian Lewis served as Counsel to the office of the Senate Majority Leader before his passing and was an early and steadfast proponent of the Help America Vote Act (HAVA) and election officials. Both were luminaries in the field of election administration who will long be remembered for their work and friendship.

“Election officials are known for their commitment to the values expressed in the EAC Clearie awards: excellence, innovation, maintaining accuracy and integrity in the election process and ensuring all eligible citizens can cast a ballot,” said EAC Chairman Thomas Hicks. “The Clearies are a testament to their work and dedication and highlight best practices other election administrators can emulate.”

This year’s entries will be judged using the following criteria:

  • Efficacy
  • Innovation
  • Sustainability
  • Outreach efforts
  • Cost-effectiveness
  • Replicability

All submissions should be sent to the EAC via an email to clearinghouse@eac.gov. Nominators should use the following subject lines based on entry category: Election Worker Competition, Accessibility Competition or Outstanding Innovations Competition.

All entries must include a brief summary of the election program nominated and attach relevant documents, images and links that can be used to assess the entry. Submissions should also include contact information for the person submitting the program for consideration. Each entry must be submitted in a separate email.

For more information about this year’s competition, please contact Patrick Leahy at pleahy@eac.gov.

 

Upcoming Events

Council of State Governments Annual Conference — The Council of State Government will hold its 2018 National Conference in the Northern Kentucky, Greater Cincinnati area in December. Keynote speakers are J.D. Vance, author of Hillbilly Elegy and Story Musgrave who started life in the Marines and finished is public service at NASA where he spent more than 1,200 hours in space. The conference will include a 2.5 hour session on election cybersecurity communications mapping. Where: Cincinnati, Ohio. When: December 6-8.

Election Audit Summit—The Election Audit Summit will provide a space for participants from across the scientific, policy and legal worlds to discuss new developments in the field of post-election auditing, and engage in the ongoing conversation on the current status and future directions of the election audits in the United States. Where: Cambridge, Massachusetts. When: December 7-8.

International Association of Government Officials — IGO’s 2019 mid-winter conference will be held in Irvine, California, January 6-11, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

Joint Election Officials Liaison Conference (JEOLC) —The Election Center’s Joint Election Officials Liaison Conference (JEOLC) will be held in Arlington, Virginia, January 10-11, 2019. Watch this space for more details and agendas.

National Association of State Election Directors — The NASED Winter Conference will be held in Washington DC, February 1-4, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of Secretaries of State — The NASS Winter Conference will be held in Washington, DC, February 1-4, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

Election Center Special Workshop — The Election Center will hold a special workshop that will include: Course 7 (Facilitating Voter Participation); Course 8 (Implementation of New Programs); and Renewal Course 31 (Election Storytelling ). Where: Birmingham, Alabama. When: February 25-26.

Election Center Special Workshop —The Election Center will hold a special workshop that will include: Course 9 (Enfranchisement, Enhancement, Enforcement ); Course 10 (Constitution, Courts & Cases to 1965); and Renewal Course 14 (Crisis Management). Where: Virginia Beach. When: April 24-28.

International Association of Government Officials — IGO’s 2019 Annual Conference will be held in Houston, Texas, July 11-17. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of Counties — NACo’s 2019 Annual Conference will be held in Clark County (Las Vegas), Nevada July 11-15, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of State Election Directors — The NASED Summer Conference will be held in Austin, Texas, July 14-16, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

 

Job Postings This Week

electionlineWeekly publishes election administration job postings each week as a free service to our readers. To have your job listed in the newsletter, please send a copy of the job description, including a web link to mmoretti@electionline.org.  Job postings must be received by 5pm on Wednesday in order to appear in the Thursday newsletter. Listings will run for three weeks or till the deadline listed in the posting.

Assistant Inspector General for Audit, U.S. Election Assistance Commission —The Assistant Inspector General for Audit (AIGA) directs or conducts performance audits, evaluations, inspections and reviews of EAC programs, functions, and operations. The incumbent maintains personal contact with key senior officials within and outside of EAC, such as management and officials of CIGIE, OMB, GAO, other Federal and state agencies, contractors and educational or research groups. Participates with the IG in developing the annual audit plan; determining the scope of each audit; developing and adjusting audit guides when necessary to meet special or unusual circumstances; and participating in entrance and exit conferences with auditees (city, county, state, and/or EAC officials). The AIGA supervises the work of subordinates, if any, and monitors the work of contractors. Salary: $119,5897-$141328. Deadline: November 30. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Certification Manager (Denver, CO) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Certification Manager to join our team in Denver, CO! This position is a cross -functional leader playing a key role in managing certification efforts for Dominion Voting products. In this role, you will act as a representative of the company with State and Federal certification officials, test labs, and other key internal and external stakeholders throughout the certification process. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Certification Project Manager, Hart InterCivic — The Certification Project Manager manages state and federal certification projects of our Hardware and Software products, under the direction of the Certification Program Manager. The Certification Project Manager must be able to exercise sound judgment and interact with regulatory authorities in a professional manner, particularly in high-pressure situations. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Customer Relations Manager (Phoenix, AZ) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Customer Relations Manager to join our team in Phoenix, AZ! This position will be responsible for effectively and proactively managing the day-to-day relationship, administration and technical/product support of one or more assigned customer accounts. Additionally, the CRM will serve as project manager for specialized projects such as pre- and postelection day support, new product implementations, and/or product upgrades/updates. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Director of Government Affairs, Hart InterCivic — The Hart InterCivic Director of Government Affairs oversees all aspects of support services for Hart’s government relations activities for state and federal government entities. These include: identifying and engaging critical stakeholders at the federal, state, and county level, researching and providing consistent and proactive communication of company’s regulatory strategy, partnering with key internal cross-functional departments, participating in industry forums ensuring active engagement where most critical, and developing monitoring/measurement tools to provide visibility and transparency. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Program Manager, CIS— the Elections Program Manager is assigned to the Elections Infrastructure ISAC (EI-ISAC) at the Center for Internet Security. Reporting to the Director of the EI-ISAC, the Elections Program Manager will partner with other cybersecurity team members to promote the CIS mission and help support our growth. The primary purpose of this position is to serve as a subject matter expert on and represent the EI-ISAC in public forums regarding election infrastructure issues. The Elections Program Manager will work with the EI-ISAC Director to build relationships in the elections community and identify tools, products, and initiatives that meet the security needs of election officials. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Field Sales Director, Hart InterCivic — the Field Sales Director works primarily on the road and from a home office when he/she is not on business travel. The Field Sales Director is responsible for creating news sales with prospects and existing clients in a defined region. Today, this role is a single contributor and does not directly manage people. This position will report to the VP of Sales. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Full Stack Architect / Senior Software Engineer, Clear Ballot— Clear Ballot is looking for an accomplished, Boston MA based Architect/Senior Software Engineer who wants to bring their technical and leadership skills to bear on a hugely consequential problem: Bringing transparency to democratic elections. The successful candidate will implement new products and features under tight deadlines. You will be using primarily Python and MySQL that interface with front-end web applications implemented in JavaScript and HTML5. The ideal candidate should have strong technical and leadership skills and a good working knowledge of the latest concepts in security, performance, and resilience. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build and enhance a platform that is changing the elections industry. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Full Stack Software Developer, Clear Ballot — The successful candidate will build and enhance enterprise-level, highly available applications using primarily Python and MySQL that interface with frontend web applications implemented in JavaScript and HTML5. The ideal candidate should have strong technical skills and a good working knowledge of the latest concepts in performance, security and resilience. One of the hallmarks of our system is its emphasis on new visualization techniques made possible by sophisticated data structures that enable high-performance in a multi-user environment. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build and enhance a platform that is changing the elections industry. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

General Counsel, Campaign Legal Center— CLC’s General Counsel provides advice and guidance regarding legal issues involving the organization’s work and operations. This includes advising on best ethics practices, legal compliance with applicable laws and advising on risk management. CLC’s General Counsel will also serve as a senior litigator in the Voting Rights & Redistricting programs which engage in litigation around the country, both to ensure the constitutional implementation of existing laws and to defend new reforms against legal challenges. CLC also participates in trial and appellate cases through friend-of-the-court briefs, engages in educational efforts (such as know-your-rights trainings) and provides legislative drafting assistance to legislatures and organizations seeking to improve election law. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Inside Sales Representative, Runbeck — to support our desired growth and market expansion, we continue to hire outstanding talent in multiple departments. We are looking for highly motivated, dedicated and talented individuals who will be able to contribute significantly to the success of the company while receiving great opportunities for professional growth and financial benefits. Responsibilities include: Contact potential or existing customers to inform them about a product or service; ability to present solution and its value to a prospect over the phone; answer questions about products or the company; ask questions to understand customer requirements and close sales; enter and update customer information in the database; keep records of calls and sale and note useful information in the CRM; process orders in an accurate manner; and go the “extra mile” to meet sales quota and facilitate future sales. Application: In order to apply, please send a resume to Tammy White: twhite@runbeck.net.

Program Manager, Overseas Voting Initiative, Council of State Governments — the Program Manager of CSG’s Overseas Voting Initiative, funded through a cooperative agreement with the US Dept. of Defense (DOD) Federal Voting Assistance Program (FVAP), provides day-to-day management and oversight of the Initiative, including research and policy analysis of electronic absentee voting systems for military voters, and development and dissemination of educational policy programming and deliverables to state leaders in support of the cooperative agreement. The Program Manager works within CSG’s Center of Innovation and in cooperation with CSG’s policy and executive management teams as well as regional offices, affiliates and members to support, monitor and improve state elections processes for military and overseas voters. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Project Manager (Austin, TX) – Hart InterCivic — Hart InterCivic is looking for a project manager to work with our Professional Services Team.  The project manager oversees the deployment of voting systems and training to both existing and new Hart customers. The ideal candidate has experience in the elections industry, is PMP certified, and is motivated to achieve success for our customers with initiative.  Travel up to 80 percent. Reports to the Manager of Professional Services. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Regional Sales Manager, Clear Ballot— The Regional Sales Manager (RSM) position will represent Clear Ballot in a designated territory to engage prospective customers, educate them on the value of partnering with Clear Ballot, and close New Business. This position is a Hunter. The RSM will be responsible for managing and growing their assigned territory and meeting quarterly and annual sales goals. Previous sales experience in high growth organizations is a plus. RSM’s will be responsible for understanding the Clear Ballot portfolio and effectively communicating the value we bring to the market. Measures of success include: high levels of sales activity, regular and consistent reporting and communication of progress, progress toward quarterly and annual quota attainment, and overcoming obstacles to get the job done. We currently have open positions in Florida and Boston. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Sales Engineer, Clear Ballot — Our Sales and Marketing team is looking for a seasoned, hardworking and energetic Sales Engineer with proven experience and a passion for selling technology solutions. This role is responsible for being the primary technical resource for our sales force while also actively driving and managing the technology evaluation stage of the sales process. You will be required to have an in-depth technical knowledge of Clear Ballot’s Clear Vote suite and demonstrating the product capabilities to prospective customers. The ideal candidate must also be able to identify and provide reliable solutions for all technical issues to assure complete customer satisfaction. Measures of success include new customer acquisition rates, renewal rates, upselling, cross-selling, customer satisfaction and contribution to overall sales team and new customer success Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Senior Level Software Developer, BPro — We are a well-established small business that has been developing requirements and producing software for the needs of state governments since 1985 and continue to maintain and upgrade many of those systems. We have offices in Pierre, South Dakota, Fargo, North Dakota, Minnesota & Virginia. We’re currently looking for an energetic and intelligent .Net Developer to join our growing team. Our ideal candidate is one who loves to learn, enjoys working as a team, and who can multitask and meet deadlines. Skills required: .NET, VB, VBA, ASP, SQL, HTML, and JavaScript. A four-year college degree is the minimum educational requirement. All applicants must have excellent written and verbal communications skills. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Senior Researcher, Public Policy Evaluation Research, Fors Marsh Group — FMG is hiring for a researcher on the Public Policy Evaluation team which serves to address public concerns and promote the quality of the community. This is done through a) articulating the public’s needs, b) conducting rigorous evaluation to assess how these needs are being met, and c) working with our clients to improve these programs and policies. This job is best suited for an individual who enjoys research, has experience leading research team, possesses excellent attention to detail, continuously strives to learn and develop, and prefers working in a cooperative environment. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Senior Software Developer, Runbeck— Runbeck Election Services is looking for full stack enthusiasts who are comfortable tackling end-to-end and enjoy building products that solve big problems and delight customers. We’re a collaborative team who knows how to get things done (Lone Rangers need not apply). We believe that small teams focused on shipping software move the fastest and make the most impact. The ideal candidate for this position has extensive back end skills (C#, MVC, ASP.Net, SQL Server) paired with solid web and desktop skills (IIS, JavaScript, HTML 5, CSS, jQuery, WPF, Win Forms). Must have a solid grasp of our basic toolset (Jira, Visual Studio). Willing to learn new plug-ins and IDE enhancements in order to boost your productivity and are excited to introduce us to new tooling experiences that have worked for you in the past. You bring discipline and care about implementation practices. You are familiar with Agile/Scrum processes, practice common design patterns, embrace clean coding principles, and employ many other techniques in an effort to bring a high level of software craftsmanship to your finished product. Application: In order to apply, please send a resume to Tammy White: twhite@runbeck.net.

Software Product Specialist II (Phoenix, AZ) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Software Product Specialist II to join our team in Phoenix, AZ! This position will be responsible for delivering a wide variety of technical and non-technical customer support services related to the implementation, operation, repair, maintenance and upgrades of Dominion Voting Systems technology products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Systems Engineer, Clear Ballot — We are looking for a talented Systems Engineer who has both a technical and services/support background which enables them to quickly assess customer needs and offer value to Clear Ballot’s customers. The Systems Engineer will gain a deep understanding of how Clear Ballot’s products operate and their optimal configuration to build a streamlined installation process of the Clear Vote election system. The ideal candidate for this position can prioritize mission critical tasks and coordinate the implementation and expansion of our systems. They will be able to work directly with customers, display innovation, think conceptually and act tactically to build consensus around system installation and enhancement and meet deadlines. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Training Associate, Center for Technology in Civic Life— When you think about elections, you might think about popular candidates, “I voted” stickers, and all sorts of paperwork and deadlines. But behind the scenes are thousands of election officials in state and local governments who are working hard to make sure ballots are counted and voices are heard. To serve every community and make democracy work, these officials need 21st-century tools and training. You can help them get it! As the CTCL Government Services Training Associate, you will develop and deliver training courses that advance the tech and communication skills of election officials. If you care about democracy, if you believe in the importance of public service, and if you love to exceed expectations, this is the job for you. Salary: $45K-$50K. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

 

Marketplace

electionline provides no guarantees as to the quality of the items being sold and the accuracy of the information provided about the sale items in the Marketplace. Ads are provided directly by sellers and are not verified by electionline. If you have an ad for Marketplace, please email it to: mmoretti@electionline.org

Voting Booths
Each aluminum briefcase contains the following: aluminum legs, privacy shield, writing base, light assembly. All units are in great shape dimensions are 22”x 18”x 3“. MFG: ESL. Election supplies Limited, Napa California. Quantity: 400 Price per unit is $50. Contact Greg Larson 408.569.1004

 

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In Focus This Week

October 25, 2018

October 25, 2018

In Focus This Week

Election 2018 Preview: Secretary of state races
State’s top election official on the ballot in 25 states

By M. Mindy Moretti
electionline.org

Voters in 24 states will decide who they want to oversee their elections for the next four years. In addition, governor’s races in other states will dictate who overseas elections in those states.

We’ll say good-bye to the top elections officials in eight states — Arizona, Arkansas, Georgia, Kansas, Michigan, Nebraska, Ohio, South Dakota — because their chief election official is either term limited, lost in a primary or chose not to seek re-election. We’ll have exit interviews with as many of them as we can in the weeks to come.

Here is a quick look at the secretary of state (and one lieutenant governor) races on the ballot this year.

And just a reminder, for electionline’s purposes, we are only focusing on secretary of state races where the secretary of state is also the chief elections official.

Alabama: In Alabama, incumbent Secretary of State John Merrill will face Democrat Heather Milam. Merrill, first elected in 2014, previously served as a member of the Alabama House of Representatives and was a member of the Tuscaloosa County Board of Education.Milam has a background in local media and facilitates entrepreneurial training.

Arizona: State Sen. Katie Hobbs (D) will face businessman Steve Gaynor (R) who defeated incumbent Michele Reagan in the primary. Before becoming a state representative and then senator, Hobbs spent 25 years as a social worker. Gaynor runs numerous businesses including printing companies that have printed election materials.

Arkansas: Incumbent Secretary of State Mark Martin is term limited. Those seeking to replace him are Democrat Susan Inman, Republican John Thurston and Libertarian Christopher Olson. Inman previously served as the Pulaski County election director and that state’s director of elections under former Secretary Sharon Priest. Thurston is currently serving his second term as the commissioner of state lands. Olson is a mental health paraprofessional.

California: Incumbent Secretary of State Alex Padilla (D) is facing Republican Mark Meuser. Meuser is an attorney and small business owner. Padilla was first elected in 2014 and previously served on the Los Angeles City Council and in the California Senate.

Colorado: Incumbent Secretary of State Wayne Williams (R) is facing Democrat Jena Griswold, Amanda Campbell with the American Constitution Party and Blake Huber with the Approval Voting Party. Williams was first elected in 2014 and before that served as the El Paso County clerk. Griswold is an attorney who previously served as a voter protection attorney and was director of the governor’s Washington, DC office.

Connecticut: Incumbent Denise Merrill is facing three challengers, Republican Susan Chapman, Green Party Candidate Mike DeRosa and Libertarian Heather Gwynn. Merrill was first elected in 2010 and then re-elected in 2014. Prior to that she served as a state representative from 1995 to 2011. Chapman has served as a first selectman as well as on the planning commission. DeRosa is the founder of the nonpartisan VOTER (Voter Opportunity Through Election Reform).

Georgia: Current Secretary of State Brian Kemp is running for governor. Seeking to replace him are Democrat John Barrow, Republican Brad Raffensperger and Libertarian Smythe Duval. Barrow has served on the Athens-Clarke County commission, as a member of the U.S. Congress and currently is teach classes at the University of Georgia. Raffensperger is the CEO and owner of a specialty contracting and engineering design firm. Duval is a registered nurse and works in the medical IT field.

Idaho: Incumbent Secretary of State Lawerence Denney (R) is facing Democrat Jill Humble. Denney was first elected in 2014 and prior to that served many years in the state Legislature including three terms as Speaker of the House. Humble has worked for the nursing department at Boise State University and the Idaho Professional Technical Department. She also taught mental health nursing at the College of Western Idaho.

Indiana: Incumbent Secretary of State Connie Lawson (R) if facing Democrat Jim Harper and Libertarian Mark Rutherford. There are also two write-in candidates, George Wolfe of the Green Party and Jeremy Heath of the Pirate Party. Before becoming secretary of state, Lawson served in the state Senate for 16 years and chaired the Senate Elections Committee. She also served as Hendricks County Clerk. Harper is an attorney who worked as a public defender in New Orleans and practices law at a private firm. Rutherford is an attorney working in business law.

Iowa: Incumbent Secretary of State Paul Pate (R) is facing Democrat Deirdre DeJear and Libertarian Jules Ofenbakh. Before being elected in 2014, Pate was a state senator, Mayor of Cedar Rapids and president of the Iowa League of Cities. DeJear is a business owner focusing on small business development. Ofenbakh is an attorney practicing in business law.

Kansas: Current Secretary of State Kris Kobach is running for governor. Seeking to replace him are Democrat Brian McClendon and Republican Scott Schwab. McClendon is the co-founder of Keyhole the startup that became Google Earth. Schwab has served on the House of Representatives since 2002.

Louisiana: Incumbent Secretary of State Kyle Ardoin—appointed after former Secretay of State Tom Schedler was forced to step down, will face eight challengers including: Fellow Republicans Heather Cloud, A.G. Crowe, Rick Edmonds, and Thomas Kennedy III, Democrats Gwen Collins-Greenup and Renee Fontenot Free and Independent Matthew Moreau.

Massachusetts: Incumbent William Galvin (D) will face Republican Anthony Amore and Juan Sanchez of the Green-Rainbow Party. Galvin is currently one of the longest serving state election official and was first elected in 1994. Amore is currently the director of security and chief investigator at a museum.

Michigan: Incumbent Ruth Johnson (R) is term-limited. Seeking to replace her are Democrat Jocelyn Benson, Republican Mary Treder Lang, Libertarian Gregory Scott Stemple and Robert Gale for the U.S. Taxpayers Party. Benson has a background in election law and administration and has written a book about the role of secretaries of state. Treder Lang has a background in sales and management.

Minnesota: Incumbent Secretary of State Steve Simon (D) will face Republican John Howe and William Denney for the Independence Party. Simon was first elected in 2014 and prior to that served in the Minnesota House of Representatives. Howe previously served as a correctional officer, was a business owner and has served on the state senate since 2010. Denney is a compliance officer at a manufacturing company.

Nebraska: Incumbent Secretary of State John Gale, who has been in office since being appointed in 2018 has decided not to seek re-election. Seeking to replace him are Democrat Spencer Danner and Republican Bob Evnen. Most recently, Danner has served as the director of human rights and relations for the city of Omaha. He also owns an emergency response management consulting firm. Evnen is an attorney focusing on business law. He served on the State Board of Education for eight years.

Nevada: Incumbent Barbara K. Cegavske will face Democratic challenger Nelson Araujo. Cegavske was first elected in 2014 and prior to that she served in both the State Assembly and Senate. Araujo is currently serving in the State Assembly and prior to that he worked in the financial industry and in the office of Sen. Harry Reid.

New Mexico: Incumbent Maggie Toulouse Oliver (D) will face Republican challenger Gavin Clarkson and Libertarian Ginger Grider. Toulouse Oliver was Bernalillo County clerk from 2007 to 2016 before being sworn in as secretary of state. She is seeking her first full term as secretary. Clarkson most recently served in the U.S. Department of the Interior as deputy assistant secretary of policy and economic development.

North Dakota: Incumbent Al Jaeger (Independent) will face Democrat Joshua A. Boschee and Independent Michael Coachman. After failing to win his party’s nomination and the candidate that was ultimately nominated was forced to quit the race, Jaeger has been elected seven times to the secretary of state’s office. Boschee is a realtor and was elected to the ND House of Representatives in 2012. Coachman is a retired Air Force veteran.

Ohio: Incumbent Jon Husted (R) is term-limited. Seeking to replace him are Republican Frank LaRose, Democrat Kathleen Clyde and Libertarian Dustin Nanna. LaRose was a member of the U.S. Army Special Forces and served on the Ohio Senate. Clyde serves in the Ohio Senate and prior to that was the deputy legal counsel for the Ohio speaker of the house. Nanna works as a personal care professional.

Rhode Island: Incumbent Secretary of State Nellie Gorbea (D) will face Republican Pat Cortellessa. Gorbea was the first Hispanic elected statewide in New England. She was first elected in 2014. Cortellessa is a chief security officer.

South Dakota: Incumbent Secretary of State Shantel Krebs (R) is not seeking re-election. Hoping to replace her are Democrat Alexandra Frederick and Republican Steve Barnett. Frederick has a background as a GIS/GPS specialist and is currently working on her family’s ranch. Barnett is currently the state auditor

Vermont: Incumbent Secretary of State Jim Condos (D) will face challengers H. Brooke Paige (R) and Mary Alice Hebert of the Liberty Union Party. Condos is seeking his third term as secretary of state. Prior to that he served on the South Burlington city council for 18 years and was a state senator for eight years. Paige has a background in sales and marketing.

Wyoming: Incumbent Edward Buchanan (R) is facing challengers James Bryd (D) and Kit Carson (L). Buchanan, who was appointed after previous Secretary of State Ed Murray was forced to step, is seeking his first full term as secretary. Buchanan is an Air Force veteran and served in the Wyoming House of Representatives. Byrd has served in the Wyoming House of Representatives since 2009. Carson is a retired businessman.

 

Federal-State Updates

The Department of Homeland Security is pushing additional Election Day cybersecurity resources to states with tight electoral races according to Undersecretary Chris Krebs. According to Nextgov, the tightness of an electoral contest will just be one criteria Homeland Security uses as it decides where to embed federal cyber technicians on Election Day and it will not be a “controlling factor,” said Krebs.

 

Election News This Week

Early Voting: Early voting is underway throughout much of the country. Turnout has been quite large in some places with records being broken in several Texas jurisdictions. Besides lines and wait times, there have been some other issues as well. In Hays County, Texas, old equipment led to connection issues which caused lines to form. From long lines to problems with ballots, early voting has been bumpy from day one in Shelby County, Tennessee. In Garland County, Arkansas, Democratic candidate for secretary of state Susan Inman was left off the ballot. About 222 had voted before the problem was discovered and voting was shut down until the problem could be resolved. In Brunswick County, North Carolina, about 150 ballots had to be tossed out after it was discovered poll workers had provided voters with the wrong ballot. The BOE is working to notify the affected voters. Also in North Carolina, county elections directors are telling voters to double check their ballots after some voters in Guilford County reported having a candidate other than the one chose getting marked on electronic voting machines.  The Suffolk County, New York board of elections has had to stop allowing walk-in voters to cast their absentee ballots at the office. Officials initially said there are too many mail ballots to process to deal with walk-ins, but have since changed their mind and will now allow walk-ins. Lines formed in several Indiana counties including Johnson County. In Bartow County, Georgia, several voters were reporting problems with old electronic voting machines “flipping” their votes. In Brevard County, Florida, one early voting site had to be relocated due to red tide, which made workers setting up the polling place feel ill.

See something, say something. It wasn’t until a voter notified an official that they  had received the wrong ballot that elections officials in Hot Springs, Arkansas realized that some voters had been assigned to the wrong precinct for about seven years. No one currently on the election commission was on it when the precincts were assigned so no one knows for sure how the mistake happened. Commission Chairman Gene Haley told the Sentinel Record the ballot activation card affected voters are issued subsequent to check-in will be spoiled. Poll workers will then manually enter the adjacent precinct part and generate a new card with the correct slate of races. “We’re checking them in so they get credit for voting,” he said. “We’re spoiling that ballot and reissuing them ballot style (No.7).”

For years, Dodge City — yes, that Dodge City — Kansas had one polling place for about 13,000 voters. This year, due to road construction, Ford County Clerk Debbie Cox relocated the polling place outside of town and about a mile from the nearest bus stop. Cox did not return messages seeking comment from the Kansas City Star. Kansas Elections Director Bryan Caskey told the paper that Cox had no choice but to move the polling site due to the road construction, adding she did the best she could to find a suitable location. She also contacted every voter and sent out advance voting applications in English and Spanish, he said. In a town that is about 60 percent Hispanic, the new voting location raised alarm bells with local activists. Over the weekend though, Voto Latino announced a partnership with Lyft that will help get voters to the new polling place.

We’ll take one of each please! In coordination with Juneau artist Pat Race, the Alaska Division of Elections has a new series of animal-themed “I Voted” stickers. The stickers, which feature a beaver, caribou, Dungeness crab, eagle, Alaska king crab, moose raven or walrus will only be available to those who cast a ballot during early voting. “Voter engagement is a critical component to our elections process and we are excited to present Alaskans with more fun opportunities to share with their communities that they’ve participated on Election Day,” State Elections Director Josie Bahnke told KTVA. Race’s artwork can also be found on the covers of the Election Pamphlets being mailed to Alaska homes this month.

In more “I Voted” sticker news, when a Utah voter recently lamented on Twitter that he didn’t get an “I Voted” sticker with his mail-in ballot, Lt. Governor Spencer Cox knew just what to do. He broke out his crafting box and got to work, creating a “sticker” for the voter and allegedly sending it off to him. When another voter complained about not getting a sticker, Cox instead responded thusly: “…if we mail stickers with every ballot, a person who doesn’t vote might wear a sticker. That would lead to chaos and anarchy and the end of our Republic. We can’t let that happen! As soon as the legislature makes sticker-fraud a capital offense, we will mail them.”

U.S. Vote Foundation (US Vote) and Hook Studios launched The Big Deal 2018 Midterm Mobilization viral marketing campaign today with an intent to give a last minute push to younger voters to get out the vote. Similar to the wildly popular “Ice Bucket” challenge, The Big Deal 2018 relies on a challenge and reward “deal” to motivate young voters to follow through and cast their ballots on Election Day.

Personnel News: Michael J. McCormick has been appointed as the Democratic Elections Commissioner for Allegany County, New York. Sandi Rasmussen is the new Galesburg, Tennessee Election Commission assistant executive director. Thomas Marvin Williamsen has been sworn in as a new member of the Watauga County, North Carolina board of elections.

In Memoriam: Charlotte Staples Riddick, the first general registrar of Charlottesville, Virginia has died. She was 94. In 1971, the Virginia Constitution was revised to create the Office of the General Registrar for locality. Riddick because the first person appointed to the job. “Charlotte Riddick was a devoted voter registrar, and she was well regarded in Charlottesville and around the state,” University of Virginia Professor Larry Sabato told The Daily Progress. “She knew she had a vital role in our democratic system, and she faithfully fulfilled that role for many years. We should all be grateful for her service.” Riddick retired from the general registrar post in 1994. Current Charlottesville Registrar Rosanna Bencoach said that Riddick’s legacy is still felt in the office today. “The family recently asked us to look up some records on Charlotte’s tenure,” Bencoach explained. “At her first Electoral Board meeting after her appointment, she reported that the state was beginning the computerization of the voter registration records, but she was using the data processing office in City Hall instead of sending our records to Richmond for entry. From everything I’ve heard, that was typical of her professionalism and take-charge attitude.”

Adam Jackson, deputy election commissioner of the Montgomery County, New York Board of Elections died on October 6. He was 34. Jackson, along with his wife, three sisters-in-law and two brothers-in-law, was one of 20 people killed in limo accident. Jackson had been with the county board of elections for about a year. Montgomery County Democratic Election Commissioner Terry Bieniek said the small staff at the elections office have been struggling, not only with Jackson’s death, but also to pick up where he left off in the preparation for the 2016 midterms elections.

 

Legislative Updates

New Mexico: Secretary of State Maggie Toulouse Oliver recently presented her office’s legislative priorities for 2019 to the Legislature’s Courts, Corrections and Justice Interim Committee. “In the coming session, I’ll be advocating for legislation that increases voter participation, creates more transparency in our state’s campaign finance system, and fully funds my Office in the next fiscal year,” Toulouse Oliver said according to the Los Alamos Daily Post. “New Mexico is already a leader in how we make voting convenient, accessible, and secure, but there is always room to grow and I look forward to working with the Legislature in the coming months to build upon our success.”

Pennsylvania: Rep. Mary Jo Daley (D-Montgomery County and Rep. Christopher Rabb (D-Philadelphia) have introduced legislation that would ban the possession of firearms at polling places. House Bill 2711 would make it a third-degree misdemeanor to possess a firearm at any polling place and a first degree misdemeanor to possess a firearm at a polling place with the intent to commit a crime or use a firearm at a polling place in the commission of a crime.

Tennessee: The Memphis City Council has voted to fund a public information campaign to explain several ballot measures, including one on instant runoff voting, that many voters and others have complained are worded poorly.

 

Legal Updates

Georgia: Civil rights groups have filed an emergency motion asking the court to intervene so that citizens inaccurately labeled as non-citizens be allowed to vote if they show proof-of-citizenship at the polls. About 3,600 voter registrations are on hold because their citizenship has not been verified.

Also in Georgia, U.S. District Court Judge Leigh Martin May heard arguments this week on two different lawsuits filed against the secretary of state’s office and the Gwinnett County Board of Registrations and Elections over the county’s review of absentee ballots. On Wednesday she announced that she will be filing an injunction barring officials from tossing certain absentees.

Illinois: A Collinsville resident has filed suit seeking an injunction requiring the Madison County clerk to make election night vote counting open to all election judges and poll watchers.  According to the Madison Record, the suit specifically asks that election judges and poll watchers not be excluded from the counting process and votes not be counted “behind closed doors.” It also asks that the Clerk refrain from moving ballots to “unknown locations without full disclosure” and from counting ballots before polls close, or other times, without full disclosure.

Mississippi: Pike County supervisors are suing Entergy for more than a half-million dollars as the result of a short circuit that led to a power outage at election headquarters and the destruction of voting machines on the night of the 2016 primaries.

Missouri:  The Missouri Supreme Court issued a one-sentence order late Friday afternoon in Jefferson City, overruling the state’s emergency motion for a stay. The denial means a Cole County judge’s decision to strike down several key provisions of the state’s voter ID law will remain in place through the November election. Cole County Judge Richard Callahan clarified his ruling earlier this week that it applies to all election administrators.

New Hampshire: Hillsborough County Superior Court Judge Kenneth Brown has blocked the state from implementing SB3, a law that requires voters to prove they live where they’re trying to vote. According to New Hampshire Public Radio, Brown’s ruling drew heavily on testimony from experts about the burdens SB3 could place on individual voters and on New Hampshire’s voting system as a whole. The state’s attorney general has asked for a clarification on the judge’s ruling.

Texas: Modesta Vela, 60 of Roma has been arrested on voter fraud charges just two weeks after being arrested on other voter fraud charges. According to the district attorney, the four new charges are for tampering with a government record, in this case, voter registration applications. Earlier in October, Vela had been charged with illegal voting.

Also in Texas, Five students at Prairie View A&M have filed suit against Waller County claiming that their voting rights are being suppressed. According to the News Journal, students at the Historically Black College accused the county of violating the federal Voting Rights Act and the U.S. Constitution by not providing any early voting location on campus or in the city of Prairie View during the first week of early voting. The suit says the county’s decision “imposes a substantial and unwarranted burden” on student voters and denies them “an equal opportunity to vote” compared to the county’s non-black voters.

Virginia: Hopewell Circuit Judge William Edward Tomko, III has ordered Hopewell electoral board members David Silvestro and Herbert Townes — both Democrats — be temporarily suspended from office until a jury trial can be held to determine if they should be permanently removed for failing to properly perform their duties.

 

Tech Thursday

Social Media: Facebook recently gave members a media an inside look at its “election war room”. The social media giant says that it has hired thousands of new moderators, invested in artificial intelligence and brought in new rules on advertising in order to combat a misinformation campaign during the midterms. Not only politically, but the site is also looking out for false or misleading stories about lines at polling places and other voting-related issues.

In other Facebook news, the social media site announced this week that it will be reminding voters of early voting hours and deadlines in the states that have early voting.

Social Media: Snap, the company that runs the popular social media site Snapchat, announced this week that it helped more than 400,000 users register to vote during a two-week period.

California: Secretary of State Alex Padilla recently launched the Restore Your Vote tool, an online tool that will help let residents with criminal convictions know what their voting rights are. At the website, people are asked to answer whether they are a U.S. citizen and resident of California, whether they are 18 or older on Election Day, whether they are currently in prison or on parole for a felony, and  whether they have been found mentally incompetent to vote by a court. Based on the answers, users are told whether they can register to vote. Those who are eligible will be provided a link to online voter registration.

Oklahoma: The State Elections Board has launched a new online tool on its website called Make A Plan to Vote. Voters who click on the “Make a Plan to Vote” link on the election board’s homepage can access a fillable PDF which will help them choose whether to vote by mail, during early voting or at their polling place on Election Day. Voters can access maps to their polling place, sample ballots and other resources as well.

 

Opinions This Week

National Opinions: Election security, II, III | Democracy gap | Voting systems | Blockchain | Voter confidence | Voter suppression, II, III |  Voting rights, II, III, IV, V | Turnout | Paper ballots | Voter fraud | Election laws | High school voter registration | Ballot measures

Alabama: Secretary of state race, II

Arizona: Secretary of state race

California: Motor voter

Colorado: Secretary of state race, II, III | Pitkin County

Connecticut: Automatic voter registration

Florida: Ex-felon voting rights | Collier County

Georgia: Pending voters | Secretary of state | Exact match | Voting rights, II | Voter suppression | Voter purge

Illinois: Rock Island County

Iowa: Voter ID

Kansas: Secretary of state race | Voter suppression

Kentucky: Election laws

Louisiana: Secretary of state race, II

Massachusetts: Secretary of state race

Michigan: Secretary of state race

Minnesota: Polling places

Missouri: Voter ID

Nevada: Automatic voter registration

New Hampshire: Secretary of state’s office | SB3 ruling, II

New Jersey: Election security

New Mexico: Secretary of state’s office

New York: Turnout | Paper ballots | Internet voting

North Carolina: State board of elections | Voter ID, II

North Dakota: Voter ID, II | Native American voting rights

Ohio: Voter purges | Secretary of state race

Pennsylvania: Accessibility | Early voting

U.S. Virgin Islands: Voting rights

Texas: Guns at polling places, II

Utah: Vote by mail

Vermont: Election system

Virginia: Election tricks

Wisconsin: Voter suppression

 

Clearie Awards Deadline Extended

EAC Extends Deadline for Third Annual Competition for Best Practices in Election Administration

The U.S. Election Assistance Commission (EAC) has extended the deadline for submissions for its third annual “Clearie” awards, a national competition for best practices in election administration, until Friday, November 30, 2018. This year, the Commission will present awards in the categories of best practices related to voting accessibility, outstanding innovations in elections, and recruiting, training and retaining election workers. All entries must be received no later than Friday, November 30, 2018.

This year, the Clearie awards are dedicated the life and legacy of Wendy Noren and R. Brian Lewis. Wendy Noren served as Boone County Clerk for over three decades and was a member of the EAC’s Board of Advisors before passing away in July 2018 following a long battle with cancer. R. Brian Lewis served as Counsel to the office of the Senate Majority Leader before his passing and was an early and steadfast proponent of the Help America Vote Act (HAVA) and election officials. Both were luminaries in the field of election administration who will long be remembered for their work and friendship.

“Election officials are known for their commitment to the values expressed in the EAC Clearie awards: excellence, innovation, maintaining accuracy and integrity in the election process and ensuring all eligible citizens can cast a ballot,” said EAC Chairman Thomas Hicks. “The Clearies are a testament to their work and dedication and highlight best practices other election administrators can emulate.”

This year’s entries will be judged using the following criteria:

  • Efficacy
  • Innovation
  • Sustainability
  • Outreach efforts
  • Cost-effectiveness
  • Replicability

All submissions should be sent to the EAC via an email to clearinghouse@eac.gov. Nominators should use the following subject lines based on entry category: Election Worker Competition, Accessibility Competition or Outstanding Innovations Competition.

All entries must include a brief summary of the election program nominated and attach relevant documents, images and links that can be used to assess the entry. Submissions should also include contact information for the person submitting the program for consideration. Each entry must be submitted in a separate email.

For more information about this year’s competition, please contact Patrick Leahy at pleahy@eac.gov.

 

Upcoming Events

Council of State Governments Annual Conference — The Council of State Government will hold its 2018 National Conference in the Northern Kentucky, Greater Cincinnati area in December. Keynote speakers are J.D. Vance, author of Hillbilly Elegy and Story Musgrave who started life in the Marines and finished is public service at NASA where he spent more than 1,200 hours in space. The conference will include a 2.5 hour session on election cybersecurity communications mapping. Where: Cincinnati, Ohio. When: December 6-8.

Election Audit Summit—The Election Audit Summit will provide a space for participants from across the scientific, policy and legal worlds to discuss new developments in the field of post-election auditing, and engage in the ongoing conversation on the current status and future directions of the election audits in the United States. Where: Cambridge, Massachusetts. When: December 7-8.

International Association of Government Officials — IGO’s 2019 mid-winter conference will be held in Irvine, California, January 6-11, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

Joint Election Officials Liaison Conference (JEOLC) —The Election Center’s Joint Election Officials Liaison Conference (JEOLC) will be held in Arlington, Virginia, January 10-11, 2019. Watch this space for more details and agendas.

National Association of State Election Directors — The NASED Winter Conference will be held in Washington DC, February 1-4, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of Secretaries of State — The NASS Winter Conference will be held in Washington, DC, February 1-4, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

Election Center Special Workshop — The Election Center will hold a special workshop that will include: Course 7 (Facilitating Voter Participation); Course 8 (Implementation of New Programs); and Renewal Course 31 (Election Storytelling ). Where: Birmingham, Alabama. When: February 25-26.

Election Center Special Workshop —The Election Center will hold a special workshop that will include: Course 9 (Enfranchisement, Enhancement, Enforcement ); Course 10 (Constitution, Courts & Cases to 1965); and Renewal Course 14 (Crisis Management). Where: Virginia Beach. When: April 24-28.

International Association of Government Officials — IGO’s 2019 Annual Conference will be held in Houston, Texas, July 11-17. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of Counties — NACo’s 2019 Annual Conference will be held in Clark County (Las Vegas), Nevada July 11-15, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of State Election Directors — The NASED Summer Conference will be held in Austin, Texas, July 14-16, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

 

Job Postings This Week

electionlineWeekly publishes election administration job postings each week as a free service to our readers. To have your job listed in the newsletter, please send a copy of the job description, including a web link to mmoretti@electionline.org.  Job postings must be received by 5pm on Wednesday in order to appear in the Thursday newsletter. Listings will run for three weeks or till the deadline listed in the posting.

Assistant Inspector General for Audit, U.S. Election Assistance Commission —The Assistant Inspector General for Audit (AIGA) directs or conducts performance audits, evaluations, inspections and reviews of EAC programs, functions, and operations. The incumbent maintains personal contact with key senior officials within and outside of EAC, such as management and officials of CIGIE, OMB, GAO, other Federal and state agencies, contractors and educational or research groups. Participates with the IG in developing the annual audit plan; determining the scope of each audit; developing and adjusting audit guides when necessary to meet special or unusual circumstances; and participating in entrance and exit conferences with auditees (city, county, state, and/or EAC officials). The AIGA supervises the work of subordinates, if any, and monitors the work of contractors. Salary: $119,5897-$141328. Deadline: November 30.  Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Certification Manager (Denver, CO) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Certification Manager to join our team in Denver, CO! This position is a cross -functional leader playing a key role in managing certification efforts for Dominion Voting products. In this role, you will act as a representative of the company with State and Federal certification officials, test labs, and other key internal and external stakeholders throughout the certification process. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Certification Project Manager, Hart InterCivic — The Certification Project Manager manages state and federal certification projects of our Hardware and Software products, under the direction of the Certification Program Manager. The Certification Project Manager must be able to exercise sound judgment and interact with regulatory authorities in a professional manner, particularly in high-pressure situations. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Customer Relations Manager (Phoenix, AZ) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Customer Relations Manager to join our team in Phoenix, AZ! This position will be responsible for effectively and proactively managing the day-to-day relationship, administration and technical/product support of one or more assigned customer accounts. Additionally, the CRM will serve as project manager for specialized projects such as pre- and postelection day support, new product implementations, and/or product upgrades/updates. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Director of Government Affairs, Hart InterCivic — The Hart InterCivic Director of Government Affairs oversees all aspects of support services for Hart’s government relations activities for state and federal government entities. These include: identifying and engaging critical stakeholders at the federal, state, and county level, researching and providing consistent and proactive communication of company’s regulatory strategy, partnering with key internal cross-functional departments, participating in industry forums ensuring active engagement where most critical, and developing monitoring/measurement tools to provide visibility and transparency. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Program Manager, CIS— the Elections Program Manager is assigned to the Elections Infrastructure ISAC (EI-ISAC) at the Center for Internet Security. Reporting to the Director of the EI-ISAC, the Elections Program Manager will partner with other cybersecurity team members to promote the CIS mission and help support our growth. The primary purpose of this position is to serve as a subject matter expert on and represent the EI-ISAC in public forums regarding election infrastructure issues. The Elections Program Manager will work with the EI-ISAC Director to build relationships in the elections community and identify tools, products, and initiatives that meet the security needs of election officials. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Field Sales Director, Hart InterCivic — the Field Sales Director works primarily on the road and from a home office when he/she is not on business travel. The Field Sales Director is responsible for creating news sales with prospects and existing clients in a defined region. Today, this role is a single contributor and does not directly manage people.   This position will report to the VP of Sales. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Full Stack Architect / Senior Software Engineer, Clear Ballot— Clear Ballot is looking for an accomplished, Boston MA based Architect/Senior Software Engineer who wants to bring their technical and leadership skills to bear on a hugely consequential problem: Bringing transparency to democratic elections. The successful candidate will implement new products and features under tight deadlines. You will be using primarily Python and MySQL that interface with front-end web applications implemented in JavaScript and HTML5. The ideal candidate should have strong technical and leadership skills and a good working knowledge of the latest concepts in security, performance, and resilience. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build and enhance a platform that is changing the elections industry. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Full Stack Software Developer, Clear Ballot — The successful candidate will build and enhance enterprise-level, highly available applications using primarily Python and MySQL that interface with frontend web applications implemented in JavaScript and HTML5. The ideal candidate should have strong technical skills and a good working knowledge of the latest concepts in performance, security and resilience. One of the hallmarks of our system is its emphasis on new visualization techniques made possible by sophisticated data structures that enable high-performance in a multi-user environment. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build and enhance a platform that is changing the elections industry. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

General Counsel, Campaign Legal Center— CLC’s General Counsel provides advice and guidance regarding legal issues involving the organization’s work and operations. This includes advising on best ethics practices, legal compliance with applicable laws and advising on risk management. CLC’s General Counsel will also serve as a senior litigator in the Voting Rights & Redistricting programs which engage in litigation around the country, both to ensure the constitutional implementation of existing laws and to defend new reforms against legal challenges. CLC also participates in trial and appellate cases through friend-of-the-court briefs, engages in educational efforts (such as know-your-rights trainings) and provides legislative drafting assistance to legislatures and organizations seeking to improve election law. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Inside Sales Representative, Runbeck — to support our desired growth and market expansion, we continue to hire outstanding talent in multiple departments. We are looking for highly motivated, dedicated and talented individuals who will be able to contribute significantly to the success of the company while receiving great opportunities for professional growth and financial benefits. Responsibilities include: Contact potential or existing customers to inform them about a product or service; ability to present solution and its value to a prospect over the phone; answer questions about products or the company; ask questions to understand customer requirements and close sales; enter and update customer information in the database; keep records of calls and sale and note useful information in the CRM; process orders in an accurate manner; and go the “extra mile” to meet sales quota and facilitate future sales. Application: In order to apply, please send a resume to Tammy White: twhite@runbeck.net.

Program Manager, Overseas Voting Initiative, Council of State Governments — the Program Manager of CSG’s Overseas Voting Initiative, funded through a cooperative agreement with the US Dept. of Defense (DOD) Federal Voting Assistance Program (FVAP), provides day-to-day management and oversight of the Initiative, including research and policy analysis of electronic absentee voting systems for military voters, and development and dissemination of educational policy programming and deliverables to state leaders in support of the cooperative agreement. The Program Manager works within CSG’s Center of Innovation and in cooperation with CSG’s policy and executive management teams as well as regional offices, affiliates and members to support, monitor and improve state elections processes for military and overseas voters. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Project Manager (Austin, TX) – Hart InterCivic — Hart InterCivic is looking for a project manager to work with our Professional Services Team.  The project manager oversees the deployment of voting systems and training to both existing and new Hart customers. The ideal candidate has experience in the elections industry, is PMP certified, and is motivated to achieve success for our customers with initiative.  Travel up to 80 percent. Reports to the Manager of Professional Services. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Regional Sales Manager, Clear Ballot— The Regional Sales Manager (RSM) position will represent Clear Ballot in a designated territory to engage prospective customers, educate them on the value of partnering with Clear Ballot, and close New Business. This position is a Hunter. The RSM will be responsible for managing and growing their assigned territory and meeting quarterly and annual sales goals. Previous sales experience in high growth organizations is a plus. RSM’s will be responsible for understanding the Clear Ballot portfolio and effectively communicating the value we bring to the market. Measures of success include: high levels of sales activity, regular and consistent reporting and communication of progress, progress toward quarterly and annual quota attainment, and overcoming obstacles to get the job done. We currently have open positions in Florida and Boston. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Sales Engineer, Clear Ballot — Our Sales and Marketing team is looking for a seasoned, hardworking and energetic Sales Engineer with proven experience and a passion for selling technology solutions. This role is responsible for being the primary technical resource for our sales force while also actively driving and managing the technology evaluation stage of the sales process. You will be required to have an in-depth technical knowledge of Clear Ballot’s Clear Vote suite and demonstrating the product capabilities to prospective customers. The ideal candidate must also be able to identify and provide reliable solutions for all technical issues to assure complete customer satisfaction. Measures of success include new customer acquisition rates, renewal rates, upselling, cross-selling, customer satisfaction and contribution to overall sales team and new customer success Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Senior Level Software Developer, BPro — We are a well-established small business that has been developing requirements and producing software for the needs of state governments since 1985 and continue to maintain and upgrade many of those systems. We have offices in Pierre, South Dakota, Fargo, North Dakota, Minnesota & Virginia. We’re currently looking for an energetic and intelligent .Net Developer to join our growing team. Our ideal candidate is one who loves to learn, enjoys working as a team, and who can multitask and meet deadlines. Skills required: .NET, VB, VBA, ASP, SQL, HTML, and JavaScript. A four-year college degree is the minimum educational requirement. All applicants must have excellent written and verbal communications skills. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Senior Researcher, Public Policy Evaluation Research, Fors Marsh Group — FMG is hiring for a researcher on the Public Policy Evaluation team which serves to address public concerns and promote the quality of the community. This is done through a) articulating the public’s needs, b) conducting rigorous evaluation to assess how these needs are being met, and c) working with our clients to improve these programs and policies. This job is best suited for an individual who enjoys research, has experience leading research team, possesses excellent attention to detail, continuously strives to learn and develop, and prefers working in a cooperative environment. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Senior Software Developer, Runbeck— Runbeck Election Services is looking for full stack enthusiasts who are comfortable tackling end-to-end and enjoy building products that solve big problems and delight customers. We’re a collaborative team who knows how to get things done (Lone Rangers need not apply). We believe that small teams focused on shipping software move the fastest and make the most impact. The ideal candidate for this position has extensive back end skills (C#, MVC, ASP.Net, SQL Server) paired with solid web and desktop skills (IIS, JavaScript, HTML 5, CSS, jQuery, WPF, Win Forms). Must have a solid grasp of our basic toolset (Jira, Visual Studio). Willing to learn new plug-ins and IDE enhancements in order to boost your productivity and are excited to introduce us to new tooling experiences that have worked for you in the past. You bring discipline and care about implementation practices. You are familiar with Agile/Scrum processes, practice common design patterns, embrace clean coding principles, and employ many other techniques in an effort to bring a high level of software craftsmanship to your finished product. Application: In order to apply, please send a resume to Tammy White: twhite@runbeck.net.

Software Product Specialist II (Phoenix, AZ) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Software Product Specialist II to join our team in Phoenix, AZ! This position will be responsible for delivering a wide variety of technical and non-technical customer support services related to the implementation, operation, repair, maintenance and upgrades of Dominion Voting Systems technology products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Systems Engineer, Clear Ballot — We are looking for a talented Systems Engineer who has both a technical and services/support background which enables them to quickly assess customer needs and offer value to Clear Ballot’s customers. The Systems Engineer will gain a deep understanding of how Clear Ballot’s products operate and their optimal configuration to build a streamlined installation process of the Clear Vote election system. The ideal candidate for this position can prioritize mission critical tasks and coordinate the implementation and expansion of our systems. They will be able to work directly with customers, display innovation, think conceptually and act tactically to build consensus around system installation and enhancement and meet deadlines. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

 

Marketplace

electionline provides no guarantees as to the quality of the items being sold and the accuracy of the information provided about the sale items in the Marketplace. Ads are provided directly by sellers and are not verified by electionline. If you have an ad for Marketplace, please email it to: mmoretti@electionline.org

Voting Booths
Each aluminum briefcase contains the following: aluminum legs, privacy shield, writing base, light assembly. All units are in great shape dimensions are 22”x 18”x 3“. MFG: ESL. Election supplies Limited, Napa California. Quantity: 400 Price per unit is $50. Contact Greg Larson 408.569.1004

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In Focus This Week

October 18, 2018

October 18, 2018

In Focus This Week

The Best Kind of October Surprise: A New electionline

By Stacey Scholl

It might be an understatement to say electionline looks a little different these days; from a newsier homepage to a new events page, Democracy Fund is improving what we know you love and offering new content to help you better understand what’s happening in elections and what’s new for administrators.

When Democracy Fund announced in January 2018 that the website would become a project within the organization, we felt then, as we do now, that electionline is a vital resource for trusted news and information about the people and process that guide our nation’s elections. Our goals for redeveloping the site were to enhance its capabilities and expand content—but our long-term plans are to create a place where readers are exposed to new ideas, opportunities for continuing education, and relationship building.

To do this, we started by thinking long and hard about the site’s current audience and their needs. Starting now, election administrators, academics, voting advocates and other regular readers of electionline will find new ways to:

  • Keep Up With Election News – Electionline is still the only place on the internet to find national and state-by-state curation of daily election administration news. Our refreshed ‘Daily News’ section allows readers to sort stories by date or by state, better enabling those with specific interests to hone in on the most relevant news quickly.
  • Track Election Events – We know that there are no shortage of election-related events, conferences, and public meetings happening across the country. These convenings are important opportunities to learn, share and refine ideas, and participate in critical conversations about voting and elections administration with advocates, administrators, and officials. Our sortable list of national and local events now makes it easy to find events you might be interested in. We are experimenting with ways to track and input these events, but event-organizer submission will be one key way we collect this information. If you’d like to share your event with electionline readers, you can submit it here.
  • Stay Informed With Exclusive Analysis – In addition to continuing to publish the classic electionline Weekly newsletter, we will also start sharing exclusive reports and analysis on elections and voting from leaders and experts in the field. This week, we hope you’ll check out a new report on “Understanding the Voting Experience.” Using data collected from 2008-2016 via the Cooperative Congressional Election Study, authors Natalie Adona and Paul Gronke offer new insight into how the public is thinking about the decision to vote or not, their knowledge and application of voter registration requirements, the over all voter experience, and the public’s trust and confidence in U.S. elections.
  • Boost Your Skills With New Training & Resources – Our new ‘Training & Resources’ page connects readers to organizations, trainings, tools, and more. Now searchable and sortable, these organizations and items are a potential game-changer for election administrators who want to connect with subject-matter experts, get up to speed on things like cybersecurity, or dig deep on a topic like election audits.
  • Find Career Opportunities in Elections Administration – The election administration community thrives not only when ideas are accessible, but also when opportunities are elevated and cost-savings are passed along. That is why, over time, we will work to populate and update our new Jobs & Marketplace landing page, featuring job openings and used equipment available for purchase from across the country. We think of this part of the website as a place to get employed and for resources to be redeployed.

In the process of redeveloping electionline, we received invaluable insight from many friends and partners, and we are grateful to them for their time and thoughtful advice. As we continue to refine the new site, we will continue to leverage our greatest asset: our readers. Please email Mindy at mmoretti@electionline.org with your questions, thoughts, and feedback.

Stacey Scholl is a Senior Program Associate for the Elections team at Democracy Fund, where she co-leads efforts to foster a voter-centric elections system by supporting election officials with tools and knowledge. Prior to joining Democracy Fund Stacey worked for the Department of Defense’s Federal Voting Assistance Program, State and Local Relations team.

 

Federal-State Updates

Maryland’s two Democratic Sens Chris Van Hollen and Ben Cardin, along with Maine’s Susan Collins (R) have introduced the Protect Our Elections Act which would require companies that provide election services to report any foreign national who owns or controls their firm to the secretary of Homeland Security, the Election Assistance Commission and state and local officials. It also would require companies to provide notice of any material change in ownership or control. The bill establishes a $10,000 fine for failing to do so.

According to NBC News, the Department of Homeland Security says it’s working to identify who is behind an increasing number of attempted cyberattacks on election databases ahead of the midterms.

“We are aware of a growing volume of cyber activity targeting election infrastructure in 2018,” the department’s Cyber Mission Center said in an intelligence assessment issued last week and obtained by NBC News. “Numerous actors are regularly targeting election infrastructure, likely for different purposes, including to cause disruptive effects, steal sensitive data, and undermine confidence in the election.”

The assessment said, according to NBC, the federal government does not know who is behind the attacks, but it said all potential intrusions were either prevented or mitigated.

However, according to The Hill, Christopher Krebs, head the National Protection Programs Directorate (NPPD) said the report isn’t quite right.

“It’s not an uptick in activity,” he said according to The Hill.  Krebs added that state and local election officials have gotten better at sharing information about cyber activities targeting election systems like voter registration databases since the 2016 election, when that kind of information sharing largely wasn’t happening.

 

Election News This Week

Counties in the Panhandle and Big Bend area of Florida that have been devasted by Hurricane Michael have asked the governor to issue an executive order to that provides greater flexibility to conduct elections. One of the suggestions has been to move to a vote center model for Election Day. Other things that have come up are concerns about mail ballots and how relief workers will be able to cast their ballots. Mark Andersen, supervisor of elections in Bay County, the hardest hit county posted this on Facebook: “On behalf of the Supervisor of Elections office, our thoughts and prayers are with everyone feeling the impacts of Hurricane Michael. Our office has experienced significant damage and our communication lines are still out. Our systems are slowly being restored which require patience and time. I am proud of how tirelessly and quickly the staff have been working to meet the needs of this office and the voters of Bay County. More updates regarding voting sites for the upcoming election will be posted as soon as all polling locations have been assessed.” Supervisors of elections from throughout the state are pitching in to help their colleagues in any way they can including loaning additional cell phones. Despite the destruction, counties are still moving forward with logic and accuracy tests. The secretary of state has yet to decide how to handle the situation.

Social media giant Facebook announced this week that it will ban false information about voting requirements and fact-check fake reports of violence or long lines at polling places during this year’s midterms. Links to discouraging reports about polling places that may be inflated or misleading will be referred to fact-checkers under the new policy, Facebook said. If then marked as false, the reports will not be removed but will be seen by fewer of the poster’s friends.

Early voting is underway in parts of the country and localities are reporting strong turnout numbers so far. In Mecklenburg County, North Carolina the board of elections estimated that more than 10,000 people voted at 19 early voting sites on the first day.  It hasn’t all been smooth sailing though. In Cobb County, Georgia voters reported waiting up to three hours to cast ballot. Due to poll worker error, several voters in Forsyth County, North Carolina received the wrong ballot during early voting. In Shelby County, Tennessee it was a connectivity issue, according to the county election commission, that delayed voters when polls opened at 11am.

Whoops! An initiative of Mayor Bill DiBlasio sent about 400,000 letters to New York City voters telling them that they were inactive and may not be able to vote. Problem is, many of the people who received the letter were not actually inactive voters. “It has come to our attention that a very small group of active voters may have received inaccurate letters from the city identifying them as inactive voters,” the mayor’s press secretary, Eric F. Phillips, said in a statement. “We’re working to get to the bottom of why the mailing list used, which originated with the city Board of Elections, seems to have led to this error.” The board of elections however distanced itself from the letter noting that it was sent by the mayor’s office using data from a political consultant firm. It cost the city about $200,000 to send the letters.

Ballot Problems: A number of jurisdictions have experienced problems with absentee and vote-by-mail ballots. The Maricopa County, Arizona clerk and recorder announced that the office will replace any water-damaged ballots after tropical storms brought record-breaking rain and flooding to the area.  In New Jersey, about 10,000 vote-by-mail ballots in Middlesex County contained errors in the recipients’ addresses. The mistakes prompted concerned calls to the county clerk’s office from voters fearful they would be prevented from voting. In Park County, Wyoming, about 1,300 people who had requested absentee ballots got new ones after officials discovered an error. The 100 or so voter who had already cast their ballots were allowed to submit news ones. The New Hampshire Attorney General’s office has identified 126 voters who received incorrect absentee ballots. About 300 voters in Athens-Clarke County, Georgia are being asked to submit new absentee ballots after it was discovered the ones they submitted contained a race it should not. After complaints about ovals on the ballot, Lucas County, Ohio is offering new ballots to any voter who has an issue with the ovals. About  one-third of Mercer County, North Dakota’s 2,600 mail ballots will have be recast after it was discovered that an independent candidate for the U.S. House seat was left off the ballot. Voters in Benzie County, Michigan will be getting their absentee ballots a bit late after a printing delay held them up. Thirty Allen County, Indiana absentee voters received ballots with candidate lists with no numbers. Yellowstone County, Montana recently had to reach out to voters in Billings to let them know that they may have received the wrong vote-by-mail ballot. Also in Montana in Mineral County, officials are trying to figure out how to deal with an error on instructions sent out with about 1,250 absentee ballots.

Personnel News: Congratulations to Webster County, Missouri Clerk Stan Whitehurst who recently received the 2018 Rosemary Plitt Award for Excellence in Election Administration. Eric Dreiband has been confirmed as the new head of the Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Department of Justice. Andy Farrar is the new Coffee County, Tennessee election commissioner. Paddock Lake, Wisconsin Clerk-Treasurer Emily Uhlenhake will retire on November 30 after 16 years on the job. Waukesha County, Wisconsin Clerk Kathleen Novack is resigning following the November election. Longtime Floyd County, Georgia elections technicians Vanessa Waddell and Donna Maldonado are sharing the title of interim clerk.

 

Legislative Updates

Montana: By an 8-3 vote, the Missoula City Council voted to expand the city’s gun-free zones to include all polling places. According to The Missoulian, council member Julie Merritt proposed the changes in September as both an emergency amendment and an update to an existing city ordinance after concerns were raised about open and concealed carrying of weapons in polling places. Weapons aren’t allowed in schools, where many polling places are. But there are also voting sites that are not school based.

Ohio: The Franklin County commission voted to transfer $245,000 from the board of elections budget to the county commission’s budget to spend it on public service announcements promoting early voting. The board of elections had previously said they would not spend their own funds on early voting advertising.

Pennsylvania: The House State Government Committee held a hearing this week to discuss ongoing issues with the state’s election system. In addition to discussion about Russian interference, the committee also discussed the possibility of non-citizen voters.

Also in Pennsylvania, Rep. Eric Roe (R-Chester) has introduced legislation that will allow Pennsylvania to offer curbside voting for voters with disabilities.

 

Legal Updates

Arkansas: In a 5-2 decision the Arkansas Supreme Court has upheld the state’s voter ID law. “In our view, providing a system of verifying that a person attempting to cast a ballot is registered to vote is relevant and pertinent, or has a close relationship, to an amendment establishing a system of voter registration,” the court said.

Florida: Late last week U.S. District Judge Robert Hinkle turned down the Democrats request to extend the state’s voter registration deadline to October 16 for those affected by Hurricane Michael.

Georgia: Civil rights groups have filed a federal lawsuit seeking to overturn the state’s “exact match” law which has stalled approximately 53,000 voter registrations from being processed.

Two lawsuits were filed in federal court this week against the secretary of state’s office and Gwinnett County over “excessive rejection” of absentee ballots. According to analysis by the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, so far Gwinnett has rejected about 8.5 percent of absentees while the state average is 2 percent.

Guam: The government of Guam argued before a Ninth Circuit panel at the University of Hawaii that it is not unlawful to limit non-native residents from voting on the territory’s future political ties with the United States.

Missouri: The attorney general’s office has filed an appeal and an emergency stay to Cole County Circuit Court Judge Richard Callan’s ruling last week that overturned a provision in the state’s voter ID law that requires voters who don’t have a photo ID to sign an affidavit.

New Jersey: Lizaida Camis, 55, has been indicted on one count of using the mail to promote a voter fraud scheme and one count of conspiracy to use the mail to promote a voter bribery scheme.

North Carolina: A three-judge panel has ruled that changes make to the state’s board of elections by the Legislature make the SBOE unconstitutional. In their 2-1 ruling, the judges did say that the board of elections is allowed to continue its work as-is for now in light of the upcoming election.

Ohio: A voting rights group has asked the 6th U.S. Circuity Court of Appeals to review a lower court’s ruling that concluded a stopgap system to allow purged voters to vote provisionally was no longer needed.

Pennsylvania: President Judge Russel Shurtleff has denied a petition to combine two Falls Township polling places into one.

Tennessee: U.S. District Judge Thomas Parker had denied a request for an order requiring the Shelby County election commission to ask the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to perform risk and vulnerability assessments on the county’s electronic voting system.

Texas: According to the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Leticia Sanchez, Leticia Sanchez Tepichin, Maria Solis and Laura Parra have been indicted on 30 felony counts of voter fraud including stealing the votes of elderly voters. A statement from the attorney general’s office said the defendants allegedly were paid to target older voters “in a scheme to general a large number of mail ballots and then harvest those ballots for specific candidates.

 

Tech Thursday

Social Media: It’s probably wrong that we love this as much as we do, but according to Teen Vogue, various Twitter users are posting fake celebrity news headlines and when followers click on the link to read the story it takes the users to vote.gov so they can register to vote.

California: Contra Costa County has launched a social media-based campaign to promot citizens checking and confirming their voter registration. The “CoCoCheck” campaign is based on the idea that sometimes voters change their names or move and in that process, do not update their voter registration. The campaign Is a simple way to direct voters to the tools we offer and hopefully eliminate confusion and voters going to the wrong polling place on Election Day.

Also in California, congratulations to the California Voter Foundation on the launch of their newly re-designed website.

Kansas: Johnson County  Election Commissioner Ronnie Metsker announced that updated software for the county’s ballot tabulation system has received certification from both the federal government  and the state. “We have exhaustively tested this,” Metsker told the Kansas City Star. “It will be dazzlingly fast.”

Louisiana: The state’s multi-million dollar contract with Dominion Voting Systems to replace thousands of voting machines has been canceled after the state’s chief procurement found flaws in the vendor selection. “I hereby determine that it is in the best interest of the state to rescind the award made to Dominion Voting Systems,” Chief Procurement Officer Paula Tregre wrote in a 17-page decision.

North Carolina: The Wake County Board of Elections has created a YouTube video designed to show voters exactly what happens behind the scenes before, on and after Election Day. It’s a really great, simple look at something that is such a mystery for many voters.

 

Opinions This Week

National Opinions: Voter registration | Voter disenfranchisement | Election security, II | Voting system | Voting rights, II, III | Voter suppression, II | Crisis of democracy | Evolution of voting | Voting integrity

Arkansas: Secretary of state race

California: Motor Voter, II, III, IV | Local elections | Poll workers

Colorado: Larimer County

Florida: Voting rights | Ex-felon voting rights, II, III

Georgia: Voting rights, II, III | Voter registration | Voter fraud | Brian Kemp | Exact match |

Indiana: Voting rights

Iowa: Secretary of state race, II | Voter ID, II

Kansas: Secretary of state race, II | Kris Kobach

Louisiana: Secretary of state race, II, III

Maryland: Election reform

Michigan: Secretary of state race | Election reform

Minnesota: Secretary of state race, II

Missouri: Early voting

Nebraska: Secretary of state race

Nevada: Automatic voter registration, II, III | Election security

New Jersey: Vote-by-mail

New York: Online voting | Polling places

North Dakota: Voter ID, II

Ohio: Secretary of state race

Oregon: Lane County

Rhode Island: Secretary of state race

Texas: Straight-ticket voting | Online voter registration

Virginia: Voter registration

West Virginia: Election integrity

 

Clearie Awards Deadline Extended!

EAC Extends Deadline for Third Annual Competition for Best Practices in Election Administration

The U.S. Election Assistance Commission (EAC) has extended the deadline for submissions for its third annual “Clearie” awards, a national competition for best practices in election administration, until Friday, November 30, 2018. This year, the Commission will present awards in the categories of best practices related to voting accessibility, outstanding innovations in elections, and recruiting, training and retaining election workers. All entries must be received no later than Friday, November 30, 2018.

This year, the Clearie awards are dedicated the life and legacy of Wendy Noren and R. Brian Lewis. Wendy Noren served as Boone County Clerk for over three decades and was a member of the EAC’s Board of Advisors before passing away in July 2018 following a long battle with cancer. R. Brian Lewis served as Counsel to the office of the Senate Majority Leader before his passing and was an early and steadfast proponent of the Help America Vote Act (HAVA) and election officials. Both were luminaries in the field of election administration who will long be remembered for their work and friendship.

“Election officials are known for their commitment to the values expressed in the EAC Clearie awards: excellence, innovation, maintaining accuracy and integrity in the election process and ensuring all eligible citizens can cast a ballot,” said EAC Chairman Thomas Hicks. “The Clearies are a testament to their work and dedication and highlight best practices other election administrators can emulate.”

This year’s entries will be judged using the following criteria:

  • Efficacy
  • Innovation
  • Sustainability
  • Outreach efforts
  • Cost-effectiveness
  • Replicability

All submissions should be sent to the EAC via an email to clearinghouse@eac.gov. Nominators should use the following subject lines based on entry category: Election Worker Competition, Accessibility Competition or Outstanding Innovations Competition.

All entries must include a brief summary of the election program nominated and attach relevant documents, images and links that can be used to assess the entry. Submissions should also include contact information for the person submitting the program for consideration. Each entry must be submitted in a separate email.

For more information about this year’s competition, please contact Patrick Leahy at pleahy@eac.gov.

Upcoming Events

Council of State Governments Annual Conference — The Council of State Government will hold its 2018 National Conference in the Northern Kentucky, Greater Cincinnati area in December. Keynote speakers are J.D. Vance, author of Hillbilly Elegy and Story Musgrave who started life in the Marines and finished is public service at NASA where he spent more than 1,200 hours in space. The conference will include a 2.5 hour session on election cybersecurity communications mapping. Where: Cincinnati, Ohio. When: December 6-8.

Election Audit Summit—The Election Audit Summit will provide a space for participants from across the scientific, policy and legal worlds to discuss new developments in the field of post-election auditing, and engage in the ongoing conversation on the current status and future directions of the election audits in the United States. Where: Cambridge, Massachusetts. When: December 7-8.

International Association of Government Officials — IGO’s 2019 mid-winter conference will be held in Irvine, California, January 6-11, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of State Election Directors — The NASED Winter Conference will be held in Washington DC, February 1-4, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of Secretaries of State — The NASS Winter Conference will be held in Washington, DC, February 1-4, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

International Association of Government Officials — IGO’s 2019 Annual Conference will be held in Houston, Texas, July 11-17. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of Counties — NACo’s 2019 Annual Conference will be held in Clark County (Las Vegas), Nevada July 11-15, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of State Election Directors — The NASED Summer Conference will be held in Austin, Texas, July 14-16, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

 

Job Postings This Week

electionlineWeekly publishes election administration job postings each week as a free service to our readers. To have your job listed in the newsletter, please send a copy of the job description, including a web link to mmoretti@electionline.org.  Job postings must be received by 5pm on Wednesday in order to appear in the Thursday newsletter. Listings will run for three weeks or till the deadline listed in the posting.

Assistant Inspector General for Audit, U.S. Election Assistance Commission —The Assistant Inspector General for Audit (AIGA) directs or conducts performance audits, evaluations, inspections and reviews of EAC programs, functions, and operations. The incumbent maintains personal contact with key senior officials within and outside of EAC, such as management and officials of CIGIE, OMB, GAO, other Federal and state agencies, contractors and educational or research groups. Participates with the IG in developing the annual audit plan; determining the scope of each audit; developing and adjusting audit guides when necessary to meet special or unusual circumstances; and participating in entrance and exit conferences with auditees (city, county, state, and/or EAC officials). The AIGA supervises the work of subordinates, if any, and monitors the work of contractors. Salary: $119,5897-$141328. Deadline: November 30.  Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Certification Manager (Denver, CO) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Certification Manager to join our team in Denver, CO! This position is a cross -functional leader playing a key role in managing certification efforts for Dominion Voting products. In this role, you will act as a representative of the company with State and Federal certification officials, test labs, and other key internal and external stakeholders throughout the certification process. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Certification Project Manager, Hart InterCivic — The Certification Project Manager manages state and federal certification projects of our Hardware and Software products, under the direction of the Certification Program Manager. The Certification Project Manager must be able to exercise sound judgment and interact with regulatory authorities in a professional manner, particularly in high-pressure situations. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Customer Relations Manager (Phoenix, AZ) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Customer Relations Manager to join our team in Phoenix, AZ! This position will be responsible for effectively and proactively managing the day-to-day relationship, administration and technical/product support of one or more assigned customer accounts. Additionally, the CRM will serve as project manager for specialized projects such as pre- and postelection day support, new product implementations, and/or product upgrades/updates. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Director of Government Affairs, Hart InterCivic — The Hart InterCivic Director of Government Affairs oversees all aspects of support services for Hart’s government relations activities for state and federal government entities. These include: identifying and engaging critical stakeholders at the federal, state, and county level, researching and providing consistent and proactive communication of company’s regulatory strategy, partnering with key internal cross-functional departments, participating in industry forums ensuring active engagement where most critical, and developing monitoring/measurement tools to provide visibility and transparency. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Program Manager, CIS— the Elections Program Manager is assigned to the Elections Infrastructure ISAC (EI-ISAC) at the Center for Internet Security. Reporting to the Director of the EI-ISAC, the Elections Program Manager will partner with other cybersecurity team members to promote the CIS mission and help support our growth. The primary purpose of this position is to serve as a subject matter expert on and represent the EI-ISAC in public forums regarding election infrastructure issues. The Elections Program Manager will work with the EI-ISAC Director to build relationships in the elections community and identify tools, products, and initiatives that meet the security needs of election officials. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Field Sales Director, Hart InterCivic — the Field Sales Director works primarily on the road and from a home office when he/she is not on business travel. The Field Sales Director is responsible for creating news sales with prospects and existing clients in a defined region. Today, this role is a single contributor and does not directly manage people.   This position will report to the VP of Sales. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Full Stack Architect / Senior Software Engineer, Clear Ballot— Clear Ballot is looking for an accomplished, Boston MA based Architect/Senior Software Engineer who wants to bring their technical and leadership skills to bear on a hugely consequential problem: Bringing transparency to democratic elections. The successful candidate will implement new products and features under tight deadlines. You will be using primarily Python and MySQL that interface with front-end web applications implemented in JavaScript and HTML5. The ideal candidate should have strong technical and leadership skills and a good working knowledge of the latest concepts in security, performance, and resilience. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build and enhance a platform that is changing the elections industry. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Full Stack Software Developer, Clear Ballot — The successful candidate will build and enhance enterprise-level, highly available applications using primarily Python and MySQL that interface with frontend web applications implemented in JavaScript and HTML5. The ideal candidate should have strong technical skills and a good working knowledge of the latest concepts in performance, security and resilience. One of the hallmarks of our system is its emphasis on new visualization techniques made possible by sophisticated data structures that enable high-performance in a multi-user environment. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build and enhance a platform that is changing the elections industry. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Inside Sales Representative, Runbeck — to support our desired growth and market expansion, we continue to hire outstanding talent in multiple departments. We are looking for highly motivated, dedicated and talented individuals who will be able to contribute significantly to the success of the company while receiving great opportunities for professional growth and financial benefits. Responsibilities include: Contact potential or existing customers to inform them about a product or service; ability to present solution and its value to a prospect over the phone; answer questions about products or the company; ask questions to understand customer requirements and close sales; enter and update customer information in the database; keep records of calls and sale and note useful information in the CRM; process orders in an accurate manner; and go the “extra mile” to meet sales quota and facilitate future sales. Application: In order to apply, please send a resume to Tammy White: twhite@runbeck.net.

Program Manager, Overseas Voting Initiative, Council of State Governments — the Program Manager of CSG’s Overseas Voting Initiative, funded through a cooperative agreement with the US Dept. of Defense (DOD) Federal Voting Assistance Program (FVAP), provides day-to-day management and oversight of the Initiative, including research and policy analysis of electronic absentee voting systems for military voters, and development and dissemination of educational policy programming and deliverables to state leaders in support of the cooperative agreement. The Program Manager works within CSG’s Center of Innovation and in cooperation with CSG’s policy and executive management teams as well as regional offices, affiliates and members to support, monitor and improve state elections processes for military and overseas voters. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Project Manager (Austin, TX) – Hart InterCivic — Hart InterCivic is looking for a project manager to work with our Professional Services Team.  The project manager oversees the deployment of voting systems and training to both existing and new Hart customers. The ideal candidate has experience in the elections industry, is PMP certified, and is motivated to achieve success for our customers with initiative.  Travel up to 80 percent. Reports to the Manager of Professional Services. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Regional Sales Manager, Clear Ballot— The Regional Sales Manager (RSM) position will represent Clear Ballot in a designated territory to engage prospective customers, educate them on the value of partnering with Clear Ballot, and close New Business. This position is a Hunter. The RSM will be responsible for managing and growing their assigned territory and meeting quarterly and annual sales goals. Previous sales experience in high growth organizations is a plus. RSM’s will be responsible for understanding the Clear Ballot portfolio and effectively communicating the value we bring to the market. Measures of success include: high levels of sales activity, regular and consistent reporting and communication of progress, progress toward quarterly and annual quota attainment, and overcoming obstacles to get the job done. We currently have open positions in Florida and Boston. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Sales Engineer, Clear Ballot — Our Sales and Marketing team is looking for a seasoned, hardworking and energetic Sales Engineer with proven experience and a passion for selling technology solutions. This role is responsible for being the primary technical resource for our sales force while also actively driving and managing the technology evaluation stage of the sales process. You will be required to have an in-depth technical knowledge of Clear Ballot’s Clear Vote suite and demonstrating the product capabilities to prospective customers. The ideal candidate must also be able to identify and provide reliable solutions for all technical issues to assure complete customer satisfaction. Measures of success include new customer acquisition rates, renewal rates, upselling, cross-selling, customer satisfaction and contribution to overall sales team and new customer success Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Senior Level Software Developer, BPro — We are a well-established small business that has been developing requirements and producing software for the needs of state governments since 1985 and continue to maintain and upgrade many of those systems. We have offices in Pierre, South Dakota, Fargo, North Dakota, Minnesota & Virginia. We’re currently looking for an energetic and intelligent .Net Developer to join our growing team. Our ideal candidate is one who loves to learn, enjoys working as a team, and who can multitask and meet deadlines. Skills required: .NET, VB, VBA, ASP, SQL, HTML, and JavaScript. A four-year college degree is the minimum educational requirement. All applicants must have excellent written and verbal communications skills. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Senior Researcher, Public Policy Evaluation Research, Fors Marsh Group — FMG is hiring for a researcher on the Public Policy Evaluation team which serves to address public concerns and promote the quality of the community. This is done through a) articulating the public’s needs, b) conducting rigorous evaluation to assess how these needs are being met, and c) working with our clients to improve these programs and policies. This job is best suited for an individual who enjoys research, has experience leading research team, possesses excellent attention to detail, continuously strives to learn and develop, and prefers working in a cooperative environment. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Senior Software Developer, Runbeck— Runbeck Election Services is looking for full stack enthusiasts who are comfortable tackling end-to-end and enjoy building products that solve big problems and delight customers. We’re a collaborative team who knows how to get things done (Lone Rangers need not apply). We believe that small teams focused on shipping software move the fastest and make the most impact. The ideal candidate for this position has extensive back end skills (C#, MVC, ASP.Net, SQL Server) paired with solid web and desktop skills (IIS, JavaScript, HTML 5, CSS, jQuery, WPF, Win Forms). Must have a solid grasp of our basic toolset (Jira, Visual Studio). Willing to learn new plug-ins and IDE enhancements in order to boost your productivity and are excited to introduce us to new tooling experiences that have worked for you in the past. You bring discipline and care about implementation practices. You are familiar with Agile/Scrum processes, practice common design patterns, embrace clean coding principles, and employ many other techniques in an effort to bring a high level of software craftsmanship to your finished product. Application: In order to apply, please send a resume to Tammy White: twhite@runbeck.net.

Software Product Specialist II (Phoenix, AZ) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Software Product Specialist II to join our team in Phoenix, AZ! This position will be responsible for delivering a wide variety of technical and non-technical customer support services related to the implementation, operation, repair, maintenance and upgrades of Dominion Voting Systems technology products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Systems Engineer, Clear Ballot — We are looking for a talented Systems Engineer who has both a technical and services/support background which enables them to quickly assess customer needs and offer value to Clear Ballot’s customers. The Systems Engineer will gain a deep understanding of how Clear Ballot’s products operate and their optimal configuration to build a streamlined installation process of the Clear Vote election system. The ideal candidate for this position can prioritize mission critical tasks and coordinate the implementation and expansion of our systems. They will be able to work directly with customers, display innovation, think conceptually and act tactically to build consensus around system installation and enhancement and meet deadlines. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

 

Marketplace

electionline provides no guarantees as to the quality of the items being sold and the accuracy of the information provided about the sale items in the Marketplace. Ads are provided directly by sellers and are not verified by electionline. If you have an ad for Marketplace, please email it to: mmoretti@electionline.org

Voting Booths

Each aluminum briefcase contains the following: aluminum legs, privacy shield, writing base, light assembly. All units are in great shape dimensions are 22”x 18”x 3“. MFG: ESL. Election supplies Limited, Napa California. Quantity: 400 Price per unit is $50. Contact Greg Larson 408.569.1004

 

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