electionline Weekly

July 18, 2019

July 18, 2019

In Focus This Week

Defending Elections
New report from Brennan highlights state funding needs for election security

By Edgardo Cortes, election security advisor
Brennan Center for Justice at NYU Law

State and local election officials are on the front lines of our elections, defending them and our votes, on a year-round basis. To do their job today, in the face of ever-evolving threats and bad actors, election officials need more resources to further strengthen our election infrastructure against attack.

“While every state administers elections in its own unique way, the common denominator among election officials is the need for additional election security funding,” said James Tatum, the Bullock County, AL, probate judge and chief local election official, when we spoke with him earlier this week.

That is the theme of Defending Elections: Federal Funding Needs for State Election Security, the new report we coauthored with the Alliance for Securing Democracy, Pitt Cyber, and R Street.

Defending Elections focuses on six states that represent the broad range of election security challenges faced by officials across the country. Our case studies of Alabama, Arizona, Illinois, Louisiana, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania provide much needed insight into how state and local election officials will use additional federal funding to help secure our elections.

“Congress took an important step last year by providing funding, but it wasn’t nearly enough to tackle the full range of threats that officials confront on a daily basis,” said Liz Howard, counsel in the Brennan Center’s Democracy Program and former deputy commissioner of elections for the Virginia Department of Elections.

The report offers two key findings:

  • Election officials across the country are investing their portion of the $380 in 2018 HAVA election security grant funds wisely in important election security projects. In fact, the EAC estimates that 85% of these funds will be used prior to the 2020 election.
  • There is more work to do. Election officials across the country face unfunded election security needs. Our report identifies four main categories of unfunded election security projects: 1) voter registration database upgrades/replacement, 2) new voting equipment, 3) audits and 4) cybersecurity support programs.

Although DHS and FBI officials may have recently indicated that they were not under-resourced at the federal level, Defending Elections shows that this is not the case at the state and local level.  Further, rural counties may be more likely to be negatively impacted without additional federal funding for election security.

With 474 days to go until the presidential election, Congress needs to act quickly to ensure election officials have the resources necessary to do their jobs and protect our elections from threats of foreign interference. You can read the full report here.

(Edgardo Cortes is an elections security advisor for the Brennan Center for Justice at NYU Law. Before that Cortes served as Virginia’s first election commissioner. He has also served as the Chairman of the Board for the Electronic Registration Information Center (ERIC) and Chairman of the U.S. Election Assistance Commission Standards Board. Cortés was a charter member of the Election Infrastructure Government Coordinating Council established by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.)

 

Election Security Updates

This week, the Senate has finally approved at least one piece of election security legislation. On Wednesday night, the Senate approved the Defending the Integrity of Voting Systems Act by unanimous consent. If signed into law, the bill allows the Justice Department to pursue federal charges against anyone who hacks voting systems used in federal elections under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act.

Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse (D-Rhode Island), Richard Blumenthal (D-Connecticut.) and Lindsey Graham (R- South Carolina) introduced the legislation earlier this year. 

“Our legislation to protect voting machines will better equip the Department of Justice to fight back against hackers that intend to interfere with our election,” Blumenthal said when the bill was introduced according to The Hill.

Also this week, Principal National Intelligence Deputy Director Sue Gordon, who serves as deputy to Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats spoke to CBS News about the state of election security.

“This is a world where the threats are to and through information,” she told the news agency, “So, both our opportunities and our challenges, I think, are related to that.”

Gordon said foreign adversaries’ efforts to interfere with the country’s election security potentially pose a near-existential threat.

“I can think of no greater threat to America than actions that would make us not believe in ourselves,” she said. “That is, national interests of our adversaries using information in order to sow seeds of division … or make people believe their votes don’t count, or position tools in our infrastructure” to otherwise affect the integrity of voting processes.

2019 Election Updates

New York: There’s still no word on which two contestants will appear on the November ballot for mayor in the town of Watertown. The town, which conducts its own elections, has no rules in place for when there is a tie and in the June election, there was a tie for second place—the top two finishers advance to November. Shortly after the tie was determined, the city’s top lawyer said all three candidates should be placed on the November ballot. This week, the city council voted on a resolution that all three candidates should advance. However Jefferson County Republican election commissioner Jude R. Seymour said he will only certify two candidates for the November election and will await on a judicial ruling before moving forward. On Tuesday, Watertown resident set the legal ball in motion by filing suit seeking to have all three candidates placed on the ballot.

Also in New York, the recount in the Queens district attorney race got underway this week.

Washington: Thanks to a local blog, elections officials in Walla Walla County were alerted to a missing issue on the August 6 ballot in time to update the ballot before going to print.

Election News This Week

Research by Clemson University economic historian Jhacova Williams shows black Southerners who live in counties where more lynchings occurred in the past are less likely to register to vote today. They are also less likely to indicate they voted in recent presidential elections compared with their white counterparts. “It’s not due to education levels or low earnings or incarceration rates or voter apathy because of Republican Party dominance in these Southern states,” Williams told the Post & Courier, citing factors commonly used to explain lower voter participation rates among African Americans in the South. “This is about trust,” she told the paper. In her research, “Historical Lynchings and the Contemporary Voting Behavior of Blacks,” found that for every additional lynching reported per 10,000 people in the black voting-age population in 1900, the voter registration rate of blacks today decreases by 1 percent. (Photo from the National Memorial for Peace and Justice).

Miami-Dade County, Florida State’s Attorney’s Office is developing a plan in collaboration with several other local agencies to help identify people who are unable to pay fines and fees and help them come up with alternatives to making payments so they can have their voting rights restored. According to WRLN at least $278 million in fines are owed in Miami-Dade County. “We should not be an obstacle for a person who has the right to vote,” Katherine Fernandez-Rundle told WRLN. As a prosecutor, her office has the standing to alter the terms of old cases. “Those who can pay should pay, and those who cannot can work out something else, like community service hours,” said Fernandez-Rundle. “It is not a waiver.”

Oops! In what officials are calling a clerical error, ever since the Blue Valley Mobile Home Park—and it’s roughly 900 residents—were annexed by the city of Boise about 150 of those voters have been left off the city voting rolls. According to the Idaho Statesman, Voters in Blue Valley were added to city rolls in June, Levine said Wednesday, after Blue Valley residents realized what had happened and complained. The county elections director said officials are looking into how the problem occurred and who is responsible. “We work very hard to keep the roles up to date, but there are times when we don’t catch an annexation,” County Clerk Phil McGrane told the paper. “I think it’s really unfortunate it didn’t get caught earlier.”

What a great idea hon! Baseball fans attending ballgames at Oriole Park at Camden Yards in Baltimore will now be able to register to vote on Friday night home games. Club spokesman Greg Bader told The Capital Gazette voter registration will be held at various locations throughout the ballpark, Bader said, including at the women’s equality exhibit location behind home plate. The exhibit, which opened June 14, is a part of the Orioles’ yearlong commemoration of women’s equality and the centennial of the ratification of the 19th amendment. “We want our fans to learn about the struggle for women to obtain the right to vote in this country so that it is not a right that is taken for granted,” Bader told the paper.

Personnel News: Dr. Kathleen Ruth has been sworn in as a member of the Fulton County, Georgia board of elections. Thad Hall is the new director of elections in Coconino County, Arizona. Before that he was interim director of elections in Richland County, South Carolina. Former Missouri Secretary of State Jason Kander is taking the lead of the Veterans Community Project and will lead the national expansion of the local Kansas City nonprofit that is focused on ending veterans’ homelessness. Gwinnett County, Georgia Voter Registration and Elections division Deputy Director Kristi Royston has been appointed the acting elections supervisor. Rindge, New Hampshire Town Clerk Nancy Martin says she plans to retire in September.

In Memoriam: Less than year after retiring as the Allegheny County, Pennsylvania elections division director, Mark Wolosik died on July 14. He was 65. Wolosik began working in the county elections office in high school and worked there for almost 50 years. Beaver County Elections Director Dorene Mandity told the Post-Tribune she was devastated by the news. “I called him, “The legend,’” Mandity told the paper. “If I called and said, ‘Mark I need to know about this,’ he would just cite the section of the law. He knew it off the top of his head. He was so well known, so knowledgeable, that everybody went to him. He helped me more times than I can say.” Wolosik worked more than 100  elections during his time in the elections office. “He was perfect for the job, honest as the day is long, unflappable and just right by the book,” County Common Pleas Judge Tom Flaherty told the Trib. “Thank God that Allegheny County had someone like that running the Department of Elections.” Wolosik is survived by his wife, Cheryl, a stepson, Justin, and a step-grandson. A memorial service will be planned for a future date.

Former Westchester County, New York board of elections deputy commissioner Paula Rollins has died. She was 63. Before venturing into the world of politics, Rollins had a successful career in opera as a mezzo-soprano and toured the United States and Europe.

Research and Report Summaries

Harvard’s Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation released a case study on the role of the private sector in voter registration last month. The study, Civic Responsibility: The Power of Companies to Increase Voter Turnout, analyzes and evaluates the implementation of civic participation programs by companies aimed at increasing voter turnout. Examining the work of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota, Endeavor, Gap Inc., Patagonia, Snap, Inc., Spotify, Target, and Twitter, the study finds that leadership of these companies view encouraging voter participation as both good for democracy and good for business.

The Rutgers School of Management and Labor Relations released a report on voter participation among persons with disabilities last week. Based on analysis of Census data from the 2018 Voting and Registration Supplement to the Current Population Survey, the report, Disability and Voter Turnout in the 2018 Elections, finds that voter turnout increased by 8.5 percent in 2018 among citizens with disabilities relative to the 2014 midterm elections. The report notes, however, that there was a national “disability gap” of 4.7 percent when comparing turnout between citizens with and without disabilities. Seven states experienced no disability gap at all (i.e. turnout was higher among citizens with disabilities than those without), including Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Hawaii, Illinois, Nevada, and New Mexico. Ten states experienced a disability gap higher than 10 percent, including the District of Columbia, Kentucky, Maryland, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Tennessee, Vermont, Virginia, and Wisconsin.

The Congressional Research Service issued two issue briefs and a fact sheet on election topics earlier this month:

(Research and Report Summaries are written by David Kuennen.) 

Legislative Updates

Guam: The Guam Election Commission is proposing several changes to the island’s election laws including making Election Day an island holiday and mandatory tabulation and publication of names on write-in votes. “We believe declaring General Election Day as a holiday is likely to increase voter participation and turnout,” Election Commissioner Jerry Crisostomo told the Pacific Daily News.

Massachusetts: The Boston city council is considering a proposal that would make Election Day a city holiday. “If we want to give disadvantaged people throughout our city a strong voice in our electoral process, this is a fine place to start,” City Councilor Matt O’Malley said last week.

Also in Massachusetts, this week the Springfield City Council vote 10 to 1 to override the veto of Mayor Domenic Sarno and put an ordinance on the books that requires the city to take specific steps, including mailers and robocalls, to notify voters about upcoming elections. However, it turns out that the city doesn’t have the funds to do it this year and the mayor, who is opposed, will not be providing additional funds.

Ohio: Members of the Akron city council have reintroduced a plan that would support the end of partisan primaries through a charter amendment.

Legal Updates

Florida: State Democrats are suing over a 70-year state law that requires candidates belonging to the party of the current governor be listed first on the ballot. Former Supervisor of Election Ion Sancho is testifying in the case on the effects of ballot order.

Also in Florida, U.S. District Judge Walker has recused himself from presiding over a suit challenging Republican-backed restrictions on the restoration of voting rights for ex-felons. Walker said he was forced to recuse himself after former Gov. Rick Scott’s chief of staff, and now Broward County’s supervisor of elections, hired an attorney from a law firm where Walker’s wife is a partner. “Although the conduct at issue is deeply troubling,” Walker wrote according to The Miami Herald, “I am relieved of those concerns by confidence in my colleagues on this Court to preside over the remainder of this case and judge it fairly and wisely.”

Mississippi: This week, attorneys defending Mississippi say a lawsuit challenging the state’s system of choosing a governor is about “partisan politics,” not protecting African Americans’ voting rights. It says Mississippi’s 1890 constitution “has its basis in racism,” requiring gubernatorial candidates to win a majority of the popular vote and a majority of the 122 Mississippi House districts. Without both, the election is decided by the House. According to The Associated  Press, in court papers, Mississippi’s Republican House speaker and secretary of state said they shouldn’t be sued but Democratic Attorney General Jim Hood should be.

Utah: The U.S. 10th Circuit Court of Appeals unanimously upheld the lower court’s decision that San Juan County had violated the constitutional rights of residents in its previous racially gerrymandered voting districts. The appeals court also affirmed the new court-imposed districts that resulted in the county’s first Navajo-majority commission.

Opinions This Week

National Opinions: Voter participation | Election security, II |Voting rights

Alabama: Secretary of state

California: Vote-by-mail

Florida: Ex-felon voting rights

Guam: Election reform

Iowa: Ex-felon voting rights, II

Massachusetts: Turnout

New Mexico: Ranked choice voting

New York: Queens recount, II | Jefferson County | Ballot images

Ohio: Election date | Secretary of state

Pennsylvania: Voting equipment, II, III, IV, V

Virginia: Off-year elections

Washington: Voting system, II, III, IV

Upcoming Events

National Conference of State Legislatures: NCSL’s Legislative Summit will feature numerous elections-related sessions include several about redistricting, voter registration, infrastructure and the Census. And if that wasn’t enough, Dolly Parton will be one of the featured keynote speakers.  When: August 5-8. Where: Nashville.

NSGIC Elections GeoSummit. The Elections GeoSummit brings together the nation’s leaders in elections management and geographic information systems (GIS) to share leading-edge findings and craft best practices to enhance election systems through 2020 and beyond. The event represents the culmination of NSGIC’s two-year Geo-Enabled Elections project, and features agenda highlights including learnings and best practices from states working to integrate GIS in Elections. Wisconsin Election Administrator Meagan Wolfe will be the keynote speaker. When: August 14. Where: Washington, DC.

Election Center 35th Annual National Conference: This year’s Conference attendees will be inspired and energized as we head into the final stretch of the 2019 Election year. We will share substantive elections issues including crucial critical infrastructure information, new election initiatives and tons of practical and meaningful election administration tools and resources including the newest innovations and ideas to help election officials as the 2020 presidential year quickly approaches. When: Aug. 17-24. Where: Orlando.

CTCL Post-Election Audits Online Series: The Center for Technology and Civic Life (CTCL) is launching a 3-course online series on Post-Election Audits, in partnership with Jennifer Morrell and the Center for Democracy and Technology (CDT). Whether you conduct traditional audits, risk-limiting audits, or none at all, this curriculum will empower you to conduct more rigorous post-election audits and boost public trust. Each 90 minute course costs $50 per attendee. Where: Online. When. Aug. 20-27.

Job Postings This Week

electionlineWeekly publishes election administration job postings each week as a free service to our readers. To have your job listed in the newsletter, please send a copy of the job description, including a web link to mmoretti@electionline.org.  Job postings must be received by 5pm on Wednesday in order to appear in the Thursday newsletter. Listings will run for three weeks or till the deadline listed in the posting.

Bilingual Resources and Marketing Specialist, Gwinnett County, Georgia —  Gwinnett County Voter Registration and Elections is responsible for planning and organizing all election voter-related activities and assist Gwinnett’s cities and special districts with election preparations. The division is comprised of staff that are proud to be part of a team that works together to assure that every vote counts. This position will be responsible for marketing and outreach for our Elections Division. The incumbent will create marketing material, work with community partners/organizations and conduct outreach related to Gwinnett County’s Election Division and the Bilingual Election Law (Sec. 203 of the Voting Rights Act). The incumbent must be proficient in oral, written and reading comprehension of the Spanish language. The primary responsibility for this position will be to educate and inform various community organizations, registered and prospective voters about election processes in both English and Spanish. The incumbent will also be required to set up and take down tables, display boards and various marketing materials for public events. Salary: $42,1620 $48,486. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Customer Support Consultant, Hart InterCivic— The Customer Support Consultant is responsible for providing application and hardware support to Hart InterCivic customers via telephone and email for all Hart InterCivic products.  The Support Consultant is also responsible for monitoring all requests to ensure efficient, effective resolution. The successful CSC will work directly with customers and other staff members. The position is responsible for responding to customer contacts, dealing with issues in a professional manner, providing technical direction to customers in a manner they can understand and being a customer advocate.  The CSC must have outstanding written and verbal communication skills. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Departmental Analyst, Michigan Secretary of State’s Office — The incumbent will provide training, guidance and policy interpretation to county, city, and township clerks statewide based on voter registration, Michigan Election Law, established election-related policies and procedures, and the eLearning Center. Assist with the coordination of Bureau of Elections (BOE) activities related to the planning, scheduling, development, revision, delivery and ongoing assessment of BOE training programs for over 1,600 election officials statewide. Assist in them supervision and administration of the election laws under the direction of the Secretary of State, Director of Elections and the Board of State Canvassers. Assist with regular statewide reporting projects, including the Provisional Ballot Report, Military and Overseas Voter Report, Post-Election Audit reports and other election-related requests and topics. Salary: $20.62 – $34.89 Hourly. Deadline: July 22. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Supervisor, Community Services, Gwinnett County, Georgia— The elections supervisor is responsible for supervising lower levels, overseeing the day-to-day management of the elections section and ensuring that the section operates in compliance with state and federal laws. The incumbent will read and interpret federal election laws, the Georgia constitution and statutes, secretary of state directives, county resolutions, and ordinances to ensure division compliance. This position is responsible for outreach/education programs including bilingual voter outreach, voter information development, and preparation of voting materials such as brochures, sample ballots, etc. The supervisor will also ensure that the programs and policies are being implemented and adjusted as necessary to ensure compliance with Section 203 of the Voting Rights Act.  Salary: $74,940-$88,055. Deadline: July 28. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Program Associate, Elections Policy, The Democracy Fund — Democracy Fund’s Elections team is seeking a Program Associate to promote and advocate for national issues in voting policy, particularly election law and election cybersecurity policy. This role presents a unique opportunity to blend philanthropy, policy development, and legislative advocacy. The successful candidate will be passionate about educating leaders, officials, and the public on the urgent need for election reform and the danger that attacks on the electoral process pose to our democracy. he Program Associate will focus on increasing the public’s trust in elections, improving election security, advancing policies and practices that make elections more accessible, and reducing attempts to change election law for partisan benefit. Day-to-day tasks will include grantmaking, policy work, advocacy, coalition and relationship building, thought leadership, and developing innovative approaches to reduce real or perceived threats to American elections. We are looking for candidates who are determined to help our democracy work better. Strong candidates will possess several years of experience working on voting or election policy and leading advocacy or legislative policy change. The successful candidate will have a track record of working well with others to get things done in a complex, fast-paced environment and will thrive as part of a small, highly collaborative team. The Program Associate will report to the Associate Director, Elections. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Program Director, National Voter Registration Day — We are seeking a Program Director to organize and rally key national partners around one of the most prominent and important civic holidays in the nation – National Voter Registration Day – held on the fourth Tuesday of every September. In 2020, we aim to break past years’ records and register over one million voters with the help of over 50 major national partners and 4,500 field partners. To do this we require a creative and entrepreneurial Program Director with sincere people skills and a passion for civic engagement and democracy. Salary: $68,000 and $76,000. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Project Manager, Hart InterCivic— Project Managers at Hart InterCivic are highly motivated “self-starters” who are enthusiastic about providing exceptional customer service. Working with other members of the Professional Services and Operations teams, the Project Manager directs activity, solves problems, and develops lasting and strong relationships with our customers. Hart InterCivic’s unique and industry known culture of innovation, transparency, and customer-centric focus creates an environment where team members will continually grow and be challenged to develop their careers. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Product Manager, Hart InterCivic — as Product Manager, you will join a team that is charged with product planning, design, and execution throughout the lifecycle of Hart’s products, in support of the company’s overall strategy and goals. This includes: gathering, validating, and prioritizing internal and external customer needs; documenting and communicating product and technical requirements; gathering market and competitive intelligence; supporting the certification, sales, and marketing teams. The Product Manager must possess a unique blend of business and technical savvy – with experience in elections technology or other government-oriented products preferred.  To succeed in this role, the ideal candidate must spend time in the market to understand its unique attributes; demonstrate competence with specialized hardware and software; and find innovative solutions for the broader market. The Product Manager plays a key role in helping others to understand the product positioning, key benefits, and target customer, as well as providing advanced subject matter expertise in using the company’s products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Research Scientist, MIT Election Data and Science Lab— MEDSL seeks a research scientist  to oversee the data science workflow of the lab’s election-related data collection, processing, and dissemination efforts.  MEDSL aims to improve the democratic experience for all U.S. voters by applying scientific principles to how elections are studied and administered. Responsibilities include assisting the director with designing and implementing research projects; gathering and analyzing data, designing research protocols, and documenting results; managing data science and quality control for the 2018 release of the Elections Performance Index (EPI); acquiring data from government sources and designing protocols to update indicators not provided by government sources; assisting with redistricting data collection/dissemination efforts; working with web designers to update EPI website and creating original content for MEDSL website; onboarding and monitoring the work of students/research support associates; tracking scholarship in the field of election science; and performing other data science/administrative/reporting duties as assigned. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Software Sales Specialist, VOTEC— VOTEC’s Sales Specialist is responsible for creating news sales with prospects and existing clients in targeted areas in the US. We are looking for an election professional comfortable using insight and consultative selling techniques to create interest that offers unique solutions on their operations, which link back to VOTEC’s solutions. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Marketplace

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In Focus This Week

July 11, 2019

July 11, 2019

In Focus This Week

Officials from vote-by-mail states gather for conference
First-of-its-kind conference focuses on lessons learned and future of ‘pajama voting’

By Lynn Bartels
Special to electionline

Oregon, Washington and Colorado are officially the nation’s three mail-in ballot states but Washington Secretary of State Kim Wyman says actually there are more.

“When 60 percent of your voters request an absentee ballot, you’re a mail ballot state, you just don’t know it yet,” she said.

Wyman was among the election officials who spoke at the three-day Western States Election Conference that began July 7 in Stevenson, Wash., at Skamania Lodge. Participants took in views of the stunning Columbia River Gorge in between plenty of talk about best practices of what some voters call “pajama voting.”

“It’s really nice to be in a room full of people who love mail ballots,” Wyman said.

The elections conference grew out of talks with Nancy Blankenship, clerk for Deschutes County, Ore., and Hillary Hall, clerk for Boulder County, Colo.

The conference grew out of talks between former Boulder County, Colo., Clerk Hillary Hall and Nancy Blankenship, clerk of Deschutes County, Ore., former president of the Oregon Association of County Clerks. Blankenship then recruited two fellow Oregon clerks, Lincoln County’s Dana Jenkins and Tillamook County’s Tassi O’Neal, who were involved several years ago when Oregon and Washington held a conference to discuss mail ballots.

“We’re super excited to be here,” Pam Anderson, executive director of the Colorado County Clerks Association, said when she kicked off the conference.

“We share a lot of similar things in our mail-in model. The question is where are we going next.”

Sessions dealt with a variety of topics, from voting for the disabled to ballot envelope design to cyber security.

Oregon clerks Jenkins and O’Neal, Wyman and Anderson provided the history of their state’s path to mail-in ballots, a move that has made them top among states in voter turnout. The Oregon clerks said along the way proposals at times failed because Democrats believed mail ballots would benefit Republicans and vice versa.

The difference and similarities of the systems were highlighted.

Oregon and Washington pay for postage, although there are concerns that postal closures and resignations of long-time postal workers could have an impact on ballot returns. Colorado does not, instead choosing to invest in 24-hour drop boxes that are emptied by county election workers on a regular basis.

Pam Anderson, the executive director of the Colorado County Clerks Association, center, is with Mark Neary, assistant secretary of state in Washington, and WA Secretary of State Kim Wyman.

Colorado also has a hybrid system, with clerks opening a required number of Voter Service and Polling Centers before the election. Coloradans can vote in person, register to vote, request a new ballot and such at those centers. The Colorado clerks at the conference were vocal about wanting to reduce the number of centers, especially in rural counties where they are not heavily utilized, driving up the costs to process the ballots.

During one exercise, election officials moved about the room and sat at tables with those whose counties have roughly the same number of voters. They shared best practices with each other and then with the entire room.

One of the themes that emerged, no matter the population of the county: Legislators don’t always take into account the expertise of election officials or their needs before passing bills.

Professor Paul Gronke, who teaches political science at Reed College in Portland, Ore., said it was eye-opening to find out that many county clerks not only conduct elections, but also might handle motor vehicle registrations or driver’s licenses, record documents, issue passports, take minutes for county commissioners and more.

Amber McReynolds, executive director of the National Vote at Home Institute, touted the West’s success when it comes to election innovation. She said some states offer no early voting and an excuse is required to vote absentee.

“Election policy must be about who votes, not who wins,” she said.

Matt Crane with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, said elections offices these days look like IT offices because of all the security.

Matt Crane, with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, discussed what his agency is focused on, including offering cyber security assistance for smaller counties that want help. And he talked about times have changed for local election officials.

“A typical county election office looks more like an IT office,” he said.

Blankenship and Hall, the Washington and Colorado clerks who first discussed the idea of a conference, said they were thrilled with the outcome.

Said Blankenship: “This, democracy, is such an important part of our daily life.”

“We’re still the new kids,” Hall said. “The idea was to get together with people who have been doing mail-in ballots for a while. My hope is that as more states adopt mail-in ballot we hold more conferences and learn from each other.”

One state moving to a mail-in ballot system is another Western neighbor, Utah. The state of Hawaii is also in the implementation queue.

The 2020 presidential election came up frequently but many local elected officials thought Secretary Wyman said it best when she mentioned school board races and other contests.

“This country is going to have a very high profile election next year,” she said, “but other elections matter just as much.”

(Lynn Bartels worked as a reporter for 35 years in New Mexico and Colorado before going to work for Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams in 2015. She now handles communications for various clients, including the Colorado County Clerks Association.)

Election Security Updates

By 225-184 vote, the House has approved the Securing America’s Federal Elections (SAFE) Act. would authorize $600 million for the Election Assistance Commission, which would be allocated to states to enhance their security ahead of 2020 and includes language that would ban voting machines from being connected to the internet and being produced in foreign countries. In addition to the $600 million, the bill would provide $175 million biannually for “sustainment” funds aimed at maintaining election infrastructure. It would also create a $5 million grant program administered by the National Science Foundation to research accessible paper ballot verification methods to address the needs of voters with disabilities and voters who speak English as their second language.

Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats, FBI Director Christopher Wray and other Administration security officials testified before Congress in two closed-door presentations this week. House Minority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., called the briefing helpful and said it reinforced the importance of remaining vigilant against outside threats to U.S. elections. According to The Associated Press, Virginia Sen. Mark Warner, said the FBI and other law enforcement “definitely upped their game in 2018, but the Russians and others will be back.” National security officials said in a statement Wednesday that election security is a top priority and that officials are taking a “whole-of-government approach” to securing the 2020 elections, along with state, local and private sector partners.

Despite the Administration’s admission that there is an ongoing threat to elections, Senators who participated in the closed-door session did not indicate they would do anything to move forward with election security legislation approved by the House.

“Federal involvement in the process, from our national security agencies, particularly the Department of Homeland Security, I think [it’s] added a significant element in 2018. And that will be even greater in 2020,” Sen. Roy Blount (R-Missouri) said according to Roll Call.

Blunt also said there’s general agreement that a paper backup for election systems is a key element of election security going forward.

“I think we’d all like to see every state move toward a paper ballot backup system where you’d have some piece of paper to count, if there was any question about the election count itself,” he told reporters after the briefing.

2019 Election Udpates

Two weeks after New  Yorkers went to the polls at least two races remain undecided. In Queens, a closely watched race for District Attorney is now under a recount. Following the initial vote count it appeared that Tiffany Caban had won, but following a count of provisional ballots candidate Melinda Katz was ahead by 20 ballots. The flip in results has some activists crying foul. The recount began on Tuesday and with more than 91,000 ballots to count by hand, it could be several weeks before there is an official result.

In the race for Watertown mayor it’s still unclear who will be on the ballot in November. Under city law, the top two vote getters move on to November. Problem is, there are two candidates tied for second place. “This is absolutely unprecedented,” Jude Seymour, the Republican Elections Commissioner for Jefferson County told WRVO. Because Watertown’s elections are governed by the city and not the state, there are no statutes in place for how to deal with a tie. An attorney for the city is recommending that all three candidates be placed on the November ballot.

Election News This Week

Update on PA Voting Equipment: Earlier this year Gov. Tom Wolf (D) required that all 67 Pennsylvania counties replace their voting equipment with a paper-based system. Wolf asked the Legislature for $75 million to help counties offset the costs. Last week, the Legislature approved a funding package of $90 million, but the legislation also included other provisions like eliminating straight-party voting. The bill also would have extended the absentee ballot deadline. The bill was approved mostly along party lines. Wolf vetoed the bill early this week saying that while he supported the funding portion of the measure he did not support the elimination of straight-party voting. According to PennLive, he also cited his objections to language inserted in the bill that would impose legislative review on any future action by the Department of State – which oversees the administration of elections statewide – to decertify Pennsylvania’s voting machines en masse. On Tuesday, Wolf announced that he is ordering a bond issue to help the counties cover the costs of the new voting machines. The bond issue would help counties recover up to 60 percent of their costs for new equipment.

The Maryland State Board of Elections will soon allow Marylanders registering to vote to choose “X” or “unspecified” for their gender on voter registration forms. According to The Baltimore Sun, the move comes as state Motor Vehicle Administration prepares to offer the third option for gender on driver’s licenses and state identification cards, in response to a new state law. The state’s elections board voted unanimously at its meeting last week to authorize the elections staff to make the necessary changes, David J. McManus Jr., the board chairman told The Sun. There was no opposition, and no one raised concerns, he said. Elections officials will continue to use the paper applications that they already have on hand, but the next batch that’s printed will include gender options of “F,” “M” and “X.” The online voter registration system is likely to be updated sooner, McManus said. “There’s no fiscal impact to it,” McManus said. “It’s just a form and we will add one little piece for it.”

An April Florida Supreme Court ruling means that constitutional officers in six counties will now be a partisan elected position including the supervisor of elections in Leon County. “It has been determined that the provisions in the Leon County Charter establishing non-partisan elections for the Supervisor of Elections have been rendered unenforceable by operation of law,” the Leon County Supervisor of Elections office said in a Wednesday email. Additionally, the opinion requires that elections supervisor candidates maintain their party affiliation for at least a year prior to qualifying. “I want to stress that although the Supervisor of Elections is now required to be elected by a partisan process, this office will continue to function in a wholly non-partisan manner as it always has been,” Leon County Supervisor of Elections Mark Earley said. .

The National Association of Secretaries of State (NASS) recently held their annual conference in Santa Fe, New Mexico and while there inducted the newest executive board. Leading NASS for the 2019-2020 term will be Iowa Secretary of State Paul Pate. In addition to Pate, Maggie Toulouse Oliver of New Mexico will serve as the president-elect, Kyle Ardoin of Louisiana will serve as treasurer and William Gardner of New Hampshire as secretary. “It is a tremendous honor to lead this bipartisan group of state election officials as we enter the 2020 election cycle. I’m thankful for their trust in me as we work together to share best practices and ensure clean and fair elections across the country,” Pate said.

Good News! In a recent interview with the Shreveport Times covering a variety of issues, Louisiana Secretary of State Kyle Ardoin said that the state will work to bring back it’s very popular Blue Dog “I Voted” stickers which were cut in 2018 due to budgetary reasons. “If the voters want stickers, well by gosh, we’re going to find a way to get those stickers,” Ardoin told the paper.

Personnel News: Rick Miller is retiring as the Frederick County, Virginia registrar of voters. He will be replace by Richard Venskoske. Donna Sharp has retired as the Hawkins County, Tennessee administrator of elections. Rusty Clark is stepping down as secretary of the Cherokee County, Oklahoma election board. Joyce Bradshaw is retiring after 25 years as the North Andover, Massachusetts town clerk. Melissa Morton is the new Charlottesville, Virginia registrar of voters. She replaces Rosanna Bencoach. Congratulations to Noble County, Indiana Clerk Shelly Mawhorter for being named clerk of the year. Mark Baserman has been appointed to the Holmes County, Ohio board of elections. Ann Arbor, Michigan City Clerk Jackie Beaudry has been named clerk of the year. Falls Church, Virginia Director of Elections Dave Bjerke has been sworn in for another term. The Washington County, Maryland BOE has a new member, Connie Mozingo and new attorney, Brian Kane. Pete Shapiro is the new chairman of the board of directors of HeadCount.

Research and Report Summaries

The U.S. Governmental Accountability Office released a report on voter registration list maintenance late last month. The report, Voter Registration: Information on Federal Enforcement Efforts and State and Local List Management, examines tools that state and local election officials use to maintain voter registration lists, which include Postal Service change of address forms and death records. The report also discusses the Department of Justice’s efforts to ensure compliance with the National Voter Registration Act and address election fraud from 2001 to 2017.

(Research and Report Summaries are written by David Kuennen.)

Legislative Updates

California: A bill requiring an audit of California’s Motor Voter program has died in a Senate committee.

Delaware: Gov. John Carney has signed House Bill 38 into law. Under the new early voting law, voters in The First State will be able to cast their ballots at polling places up to 10 days before Election Day.

Florida: Gov. Ron DeSantis (R) has signed a bill into law that would require felons released from prison to pay all required restitution before their voting rights are restored.

New Hampshire: Gov. Chris Sununu (R) has vetoed a bill that would have allowed for limited release of certain data in the state’s centralized voter registration database, pursuant to a court order when necessary “to protect the right to vote from infringement.”

New York: Sen. Joseph Addabbo has introduced a bill that would require all voting machines to notify voters if they have chosen a candidate listed on the ballot who has officially withdrawn from the race prior to election day. It would also allow the voter a chance to switch their vote, if they choose to do so.

North Carolina: The Senate has approved a bill that would eliminate a statewide absentee ballot request form that can be mass copied, filled out and turned in to local county boards. Instead, individual voters would have to write personal requests, as they used to do, to receive a ballot. The person fills out the ballot, gets witness signatures and sends it in an envelope.

Oregon: The Senate has approved a bill that will cover postage for ballots. Under the measure, ballot return envelopes would include pre-paid postage in the form of a “business reply mail” envelope. It means the ballots can be mailed from anywhere in the United States without needing a stamp. The bill now heads to the desk of Gov. Kate Brown, who has expressed strong support for the legislation.

Legal Updates

California: An indictment unsealed in Los Angeles charged nine people accused of participating in voting fraud schemes — in which homeless people were allegedly offered cash or cigarettes in exchange for forged signatures on initiative petitions and voter registration forms. According to NBC, Prosecutors have accused the group of 14 felonies for a variety of alleged acts during the 2016 and 2018 election cycles, including charges of circulating an initiative with forged or fictitious names, signing fictitious names, registering fictitious persons, and making payment for signatures, according to the indictment. None of the defendants faces all of the charges.

Florida: Arguing an omnibus elections bill signed by Gov. Ron DeSantis makes the case moot, lawyers for the state are asking a federal judge to throw out a lawsuit challenging how Florida elections officials handle mismatched signatures on mail-in and provisional ballots.

Also in Florida, Lawyers representing voting-rights and civil-rights groups, as well as more than a dozen Floridians who’ve been convicted of felonies, filed three lawsuits in federal court, immediately after Gov. Ron DeSantis signed into law an omnibus elections measure (SB 7066) that included the implementation of Amendment 4. The Southern Poverty Law Center filed a fourth lawsuit. The legal challenges, combined into one case by U.S. District Judge Mark Walker, allege the legislation unconstitutionally “creates two classes of citizens,” depending on their ability to pay financial obligations that many don’t even know about.

In documents filed this week, plaintiffs in a long-running dispute over campus early voting sites argued that language slipped into SB7066 that requires college campus early voting sites to have “sufficient non-permitted parking” will create an unconstitutional burden on young voters.

Georgia: U.S. District Judge Amy Totenberg  this week ordered election officials to allow computer experts to review databases used to configure ballots and tabulate votes. The ruling comes in a lawsuit by election integrity advocates who doubt the accuracy of the state’s voting machines.

According to The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, a lawsuit over rejected absentee ballots has been dismissed following the passage of House Bill 316 that will change how absentee ballots are reviewed. “The parties agree that the above-cited provisions make further litigation of this matter unnecessary,” according to a joint stipulation for dismissal last month.

Pennsylvania: Westmoreland County Judge Harry F. Small approved a new voter precinct plan for Upper Burrell that will more evenly divide the number of voters between the township’s two precincts.

Texas: Klaus Michael Adam, 77, a Killeen municipal election judge, was indicted by the Bell County Grand Jury on the charge of criminal attempt illegal voting.

Tech Thursday

Social Media: After a federal court ruled that the president could not block users from his Twitter account, Alabama Secretary of State John Merrill, who has also been sued by users that he has blocked, said that there is a key difference between his situation and the president’s. Merrill said that because he does not use @JohnHMerrill, the account he has been sued about, for official business the ruling against the president does not apply. “I do answer questions when people raise them and I have interacted with constituents when they initiated it,” Merrill said according to AL.com. “That’s responding to inquiries. That’s not me promoting something or introducing something for the first time from the office of the Secretary of State.” That’s a point of contention in the lawsuit filed against Merrill by the American Civil Liberties Union of Alabama on behalf of three blocked Twitter users. The plaintiffs claim Merrill does use the account for official business.

Opinions This Week

National Opinions: Election security, II, III | Student voters | SCOTUS rulings | U.S. Election Assistance Commission | Election officials

Arizona: Maricopa County, II, III

Connecticut: Suffrage

District of Columbia: Felon enfranchisement

Florida: Election security, II | Ex-felon voting rights, II | Election information | Early voting | Poll tax | 2000 election

Louisiana: Election reform

Maryland: Election security | Ex-felon voting rights

Massachusetts: Election day registration

Minnesota: Primaries

Nevada: Lines

New Hampshire: Election security

New Jersey: Vote buying

New Mexico: Election system

New York: Erie County | Election reform | Rensselaer County | Early voting | Election errors | Recount

Ohio: Election security

Oklahoma: Election security

Pennsylvania: Primaries | Election reform, II, III| Equipment costs, II

Washington: Voter registration | Election security

Upcoming Events

National Conference of State Legislatures: NCSL’s Legislative Summit will feature numerous elections-related sessions include several about redistricting, voter registration, infrastructure and the Census. And if that wasn’t enough, Dolly Parton will be one of the featured keynote speakers.  When: August 5-8. Where: Nashville.

Election Center 35th Annual National Conference: This year’s Conference attendees will be inspired and energized as we head into the final stretch of the 2019 Election year. We will share substantive elections issues including crucial critical infrastructure information, new election initiatives and tons of practical and meaningful election administration tools and resources including the newest innovations and ideas to help election officials as the 2020 presidential year quickly approaches. When: Aug. 17-24. Where: Orlando.

CTCL Post-Election Audits Online Series: The Center for Technology and Civic Life (CTCL) is launching a 3-course online series on Post-Election Audits, in partnership with Jennifer Morrell and the Center for Democracy and Technology (CDT). Whether you conduct traditional audits, risk-limiting audits, or none at all, this curriculum will empower you to conduct more rigorous post-election audits and boost public trust. Each 90 minute course costs $50 per attendee. Where: Online. When. Aug. 20-27.

Job Postings This Week

electionlineWeekly publishes election administration job postings each week as a free service to our readers. To have your job listed in the newsletter, please send a copy of the job description, including a web link to mmoretti@electionline.org.  Job postings must be received by 5pm on Wednesday in order to appear in the Thursday newsletter. Listings will run for three weeks or till the deadline listed in the posting.

Bilingual Resources and Marketing Specialist, Gwinnett County, Georgia —  Gwinnett County Voter Registration and Elections is responsible for planning and organizing all election voter-related activities and assist Gwinnett’s cities and special districts with election preparations. The division is comprised of staff that are proud to be part of a team that works together to assure that every vote counts. This position will be responsible for marketing and outreach for our Elections Division. The incumbent will create marketing material, work with community partners/organizations and conduct outreach related to Gwinnett County’s Election Division and the Bilingual Election Law (Sec. 203 of the Voting Rights Act). The incumbent must be proficient in oral, written and reading comprehension of the Spanish language. The primary responsibility for this position will be to educate and inform various community organizations, registered and prospective voters about election processes in both English and Spanish. The incumbent will also be required to set up and take down tables, display boards and various marketing materials for public events. Salary: $42,1620 $48,486. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Customer Support Consultant, Hart InterCivic— The Customer Support Consultant is responsible for providing application and hardware support to Hart InterCivic customers via telephone and email for all Hart InterCivic products.  The Support Consultant is also responsible for monitoring all requests to ensure efficient, effective resolution. The successful CSC will work directly with customers and other staff members. The position is responsible for responding to customer contacts, dealing with issues in a professional manner, providing technical direction to customers in a manner they can understand and being a customer advocate.  The CSC must have outstanding written and verbal communication skills. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Departmental Analyst, Michigan Secretary of State’s Office — The incumbent will provide training, guidance and policy interpretation to county, city, and township clerks statewide based on voter registration, Michigan Election Law, established election-related policies and procedures, and the eLearning Center. Assist with the coordination of Bureau of Elections (BOE) activities related to the planning, scheduling, development, revision, delivery and ongoing assessment of BOE training programs for over 1,600 election officials statewide. Assist in them supervision and administration of the election laws under the direction of the Secretary of State, Director of Elections and the Board of State Canvassers. Assist with regular statewide reporting projects, including the Provisional Ballot Report, Military and Overseas Voter Report, Post-Election Audit reports and other election-related requests and topics. Salary: $20.62 – $34.89 Hourly. Deadline: July 22. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Election Coordinator, Solano County, California— The Elections Coordinator is a supervisor who is charged with successfully overseeing a specific election function – this could be either Voter Registration, Vote by Mail, Candidate Services, or Poll Places/Poll Workers.  Each of the four Coordinators within our office are rotated every four years for cross-training and expanding job knowledge. Additional duties involve participating in developing, updating and implementing office procedures to comply with Federal and State laws; training staff and potentially poll workers; working with community stakeholders in achieving our mission; or coordinating the work of contractors that assist with our operation.  The Ideal candidates will have experience in conducting elections and supervising employees. Skills in Microsoft Office applications including Access and Excel; Geographic information systems such as ArcMap; or experience with web design and adobe software packages are beneficial. Salary: $33.41 – $40.61 hourly. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Lead Specialist, Douglas County, Colorado— The Elections Lead Specialist assists in the supervision and coordination of elections operations, staff, and election judges including voter services, mail ballot processing and the conduct of elections. The objective of this position is to perform a variety of functions and diverse support roles on a routine basis. Mail Ballot Processing responsibilities are prioritized over other duties during election cycles, which may increase or decrease dramatically depending on the Elections cycle. In the absence of the Operations Manager, assumes responsibility for front-line functions associated with elections operations. This is a highly visible position requiring exceptional leadership, organizational, and communication skills. Salary: $3,550-$4,438 monthly. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Election Specialist I, Douglas County, Colorado — This position is focused on routine customer service and general office/clerical support including data entry, communications, and processing mail. This is a support role capable of performing a variety of tasks, with problem solving abilities, managing multiple competing responsibilities and prioritizing to maintain a continuous flow of election office operations. This is a visible and crucial position requiring exceptional computer, customer service, and communication skills. This is a benefited part-time position and benefits are pro-rated to 30 hours per week. This is an open until filled posting, review of applications and interviews will begin immediately and continue until suitable candidates are selected. Salary: $16.40-$20.50/hourly. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Election Specialist II, Douglas County, Colorado— The Election Specialist II is responsible for routine support services related to temporary employees, training, Voter Service and Polling Centers, mail ballot processing, voter registration, and customer service. This position contributes to the department’s achievement of delivering efficient, transparent, fair and accurate elections as well as performs other projects as assigned. This position requires technical work in a lead role capable of performing a variety of complex tasks, with solving problem abilities, managing multiple competing tasks and prioritizing to maintain a continuous flow of operations and temporary support. This is a visible and crucial position requiring previous elections experience, and exceptional computer, customer service, and communication skills. Please note this position is posted as open until filled, review of applications will begin immediately and continue until a suitable candidate is selected. Salary: $3,214 – $4,017 Monthly. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Supervisor, Community Services, Gwinnett County, Georgia— The elections supervisor is responsible for supervising lower levels, overseeing the day-to-day management of the elections section and ensuring that the section operates in compliance with state and federal laws. The incumbent will read and interpret federal election laws, the Georgia constitution and statutes, secretary of state directives, county resolutions, and ordinances to ensure division compliance. This position is responsible for outreach/education programs including bilingual voter outreach, voter information development, and preparation of voting materials such as brochures, sample ballots, etc. The supervisor will also ensure that the programs and policies are being implemented and adjusted as necessary to ensure compliance with Section 203 of the Voting Rights Act.  Salary: $74,940-$88,055. Deadline: July 28. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Program Associate, Elections Policy, The Democracy Fund — Democracy Fund’s Elections team is seeking a Program Associate to promote and advocate for national issues in voting policy, particularly election law and election cybersecurity policy. This role presents a unique opportunity to blend philanthropy, policy development, and legislative advocacy. The successful candidate will be passionate about educating leaders, officials, and the public on the urgent need for election reform and the danger that attacks on the electoral process pose to our democracy. he Program Associate will focus on increasing the public’s trust in elections, improving election security, advancing policies and practices that make elections more accessible, and reducing attempts to change election law for partisan benefit. Day-to-day tasks will include grantmaking, policy work, advocacy, coalition and relationship building, thought leadership, and developing innovative approaches to reduce real or perceived threats to American elections. We are looking for candidates who are determined to help our democracy work better. Strong candidates will possess several years of experience working on voting or election policy and leading advocacy or legislative policy change. The successful candidate will have a track record of working well with others to get things done in a complex, fast-paced environment and will thrive as part of a small, highly collaborative team. The Program Associate will report to the Associate Director, Elections. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Program Director, National Voter Registration Day — We are seeking a Program Director to organize and rally key national partners around one of the most prominent and important civic holidays in the nation – National Voter Registration Day – held on the fourth Tuesday of every September. In 2020, we aim to break past years’ records and register over one million voters with the help of over 50 major national partners and 4,500 field partners. To do this we require a creative and entrepreneurial Program Director with sincere people skills and a passion for civic engagement and democracy. Salary: $68,000 and $76,000. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Project Manager, Hart InterCivic— Project Managers at Hart InterCivic are highly motivated “self-starters” who are enthusiastic about providing exceptional customer service. Working with other members of the Professional Services and Operations teams, the Project Manager directs activity, solves problems, and develops lasting and strong relationships with our customers. Hart InterCivic’s unique and industry known culture of innovation, transparency, and customer-centric focus creates an environment where team members will continually grow and be challenged to develop their careers. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Product Manager, Hart InterCivic — as Product Manager, you will join a team that is charged with product planning, design, and execution throughout the lifecycle of Hart’s products, in support of the company’s overall strategy and goals. This includes: gathering, validating, and prioritizing internal and external customer needs; documenting and communicating product and technical requirements; gathering market and competitive intelligence; supporting the certification, sales, and marketing teams. The Product Manager must possess a unique blend of business and technical savvy – with experience in elections technology or other government-oriented products preferred.  To succeed in this role, the ideal candidate must spend time in the market to understand its unique attributes; demonstrate competence with specialized hardware and software; and find innovative solutions for the broader market. The Product Manager plays a key role in helping others to understand the product positioning, key benefits, and target customer, as well as providing advanced subject matter expertise in using the company’s products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Research Scientist, MIT Election Data and Science Lab— MEDSL seeks a research scientist  to oversee the data science workflow of the lab’s election-related data collection, processing, and dissemination efforts.  MEDSL aims to improve the democratic experience for all U.S. voters by applying scientific principles to how elections are studied and administered. Responsibilities include assisting the director with designing and implementing research projects; gathering and analyzing data, designing research protocols, and documenting results; managing data science and quality control for the 2018 release of the Elections Performance Index (EPI); acquiring data from government sources and designing protocols to update indicators not provided by government sources; assisting with redistricting data collection/dissemination efforts; working with web designers to update EPI website and creating original content for MEDSL website; onboarding and monitoring the work of students/research support associates; tracking scholarship in the field of election science; and performing other data science/administrative/reporting duties as assigned. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here

Software Sales Specialist, VOTEC— VOTEC’s Sales Specialist is responsible for creating news sales with prospects and existing clients in targeted areas in the US. We are looking for an election professional comfortable using insight and consultative selling techniques to create interest that offers unique solutions on their operations, which link back to VOTEC’s solutions. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Tabulation and Technology Specialist, Nassau County Supervisor of Elections–This is a highly detailed administrative and technical professional position. This position will assist with all activities in the tabulation room pre and post-election, ensure quality assurance, and interact with all areas to improve processes. Assist with warehouse management to include overall management of all equipment and supplies used at the polling place. Prepare training materials and train election workers on voting equipment. Implementing measurement of results for future strategic planning. Special projects as assigned. This is an open until filled posting, review of applications and interviews will begin immediately and continue until a suitable candidate is selected. Salary: $16.67-$25.36/hourly. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Marketplace

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In Focus This Week

June 27, 2019

June 27, 2019

In Focus This Week

(Editor’s Note: Due to the 4th of July holiday, electionline Weekly will not publish next week and there will be no Daily News posting on July 4 and 5. Have happy and safe holiday.)

Stewards of Democracy
The views of American local election officials 

By Natalie Adona, Elections Senior Research and Learning Associate
The Democracy Fund

Local elections officials (LEOs) are the stewards of our democracy, but oftentimes they are left out of important conversations about the future of our elections nationwide. The LEOs from our survey are the chief elections officers in their local jurisdictions. Not to be confused with poll workers, the LEOs surveyed in our new report oversee local election processes and are responsible for ensuring the voting process is fair, free, and secure. Among their many responsibilities, LEOs execute the election laws in their state, make decisions that define the voter experience, and train the permanent and temporary employees that interact with the electorate.

It might be hard to imagine but (depending on how you count) between 7,000-10,000 local election officials manage the front line of elections in the United States. Despite their recognition as the people who run elections, LEOs are often left out of national conversations about reform and may not have a seat at the table when important policy decisions are made at the local, state, or federal levels—decisions that they alone will ultimately implement.

Stewards of Democracy: The Views of American Local Election Officials details the findings of the Democracy Fund-Reed College 2018 Survey of Local Election Officials (2018 LEO Survey), and is part of our effort to create a space for these stewards of democracy to be heard. The survey is designed to capture the collective experience of officials across the country, and to help us learn more about their perspectives on election administration, access, integrity, and reform. The results should be interpreted as a snapshot of opinion taken in the midst of a competitive midterm election.

More than 1,000 LEOs from across the country responded to our survey. Our survey respondents serve over 81 million registered voters. They manage offices with staffs of one or two in the smallest jurisdictions to over 1,000 employees in the largest (not including poll workers). Our hope is that this report will be the start of an ongoing attempt to elevate LEO’s voices in efforts to modernize and secure American elections.

The report breaks down the findings of the survey into four sections:

Meet Your Local Election Official – This section provides data on the professional and demographic profile of the typical LEO including LEO workload, years in service, pay, professional training and other demographic information.

Running the 2018 Election – This section covers findings on 2018 election preparedness including information on resources, staff, meeting the challenges of cybersecurity, and confidence in voter registration list security.

Voter-Centric Elections: Education and Outreach – This section discusses LEO attitudes regarding accessibility, including voter education and outreach.

Improving Elections Using New and Old Tools – This section focuses on the adoption of modernization and of technology, such as online voter registration and automatic voter registration systems to improve elections. It also covers our analysis of LEO opinions, in their own words, on how they think elections can be improved, including legislative and policy changes involving voting.

The bottom line is that all the LEOs we surveyed care deeply about their ability to administer elections in an accessible, efficient, and secure fashion. We were particularly moved by how our survey demonstrated LEOs’ dedication to a positive voter experience and to nonpartisan election administration. Respondents in our survey made it clear that they have and will continue to be good stewards of democracy—but resources, staffing, and coordination between state and local officials are areas of concern.

We plan to solicit LEO opinions again, at different times, using different lenses. We hope that our efforts encourage conversations and collaboration with LEOs and lead to reforms that best serve the American electorate—providing policymakers with invaluable insight into the makeup of the election administration field and its evolving needs as it hopefully becomes more diverse in the coming years.

 

EAVS 2018

2018 Election Administration and Voting Survey (EAVS)

The U.S. Election Assistance Commission (EAC) today released findings from the 2018 Election Administration and Voting Survey (EAVS), the most comprehensive source of state- and local jurisdiction-level data about election administration in the United States.

“For the last 15 years, the EAVS has played a vital role in helping election officials, policy makers and other election stakeholders identify trends, anticipate and respond to voter needs, and invest resources to improve election administration and the voter experience,” said EAC Chairwoman Christy McCormick. “This year, the EAC was pleased to make several notable improvements to improve the survey’s data quality and completeness and make the survey more accessible and useful to the election community.”

The EAC has taken multiple steps since 2016 to strengthen the EAVS. For example, EAVS Section F questions on voting equipment makes and models were redesigned, resulting in substantially improved data quality. The Statutory Overview was re-named the Policy Survey and given a new format to provide better context for understanding the EAVS data and make it easier to interpret the results and create comparisons across states. The EAC also introduced new questions within the Policy Survey relevant to cybersecurity, including on the functionality of statewide voter registration databases, online voter registration, election failsafe mechanisms, and post-election auditing.

“While election administration across the nation is largely decentralized, this report allows us to better understand election frameworks and operations in each state and most localities,” said Dr. Nichelle Williams, EAC Director of Research, who leads the EAVS. “It also depicts election administration trends over time, such as the increased usage of electronic poll books and increased rates of early in-person voting.”

The EAC contracted with Fors Marsh Group to conduct the survey. EAVS Section B, which concerned voting by military and overseas citizens, was administered in partnership with the Department of Defense’s Federal Voting Assistance Program (FVAP).

Some notable findings from the 2018 EAVS include:

Turnout

  • More than 120 million Americans, or 52 percent of the estimated Citizen Voting Age Population, voted in the 2018 Midterm Elections.
  • The nationwide turnout rate was 15.5 percentage points higher than in the 2014 Midterm Election, with some states reporting turnout levels that approached those of a typical Presidential Election.

Voter Registration

  • More than 211 million persons were reported as registered and eligible to vote in the 2018 Midterm Elections, an increase of 11 percent over the 2014 Midterm Elections.
  • Nearly 80 million voter registration applications were received between the 2016 and 2018 Federal Elections.
  • Departments of Motor Vehicles (DMVs) remained the most utilized method for voter registration and accounted for 45 percent of registrations, an increase of 33 percent over 2014.
  • Online voter registration is allowed in 39 states and territories, and accounted for 16 percent of registrations in 2018, a six-point increase over 2014. This represented a slight decrease from 2016, when 22 percent of registration applications were processed online.
  • Nearly half of states have some kind of policy allowing for same day voter registration and more than 800,000 same day registrations were processed during the 2018 Midterm Elections.

By-Mail and In-Person Early Voting

  • Voting in-person on Election Day remained the most-used mode of voting. More than half of voters cast their ballots in person on Election Day.
  • However, by-mail voting was used by a quarter of the electorate in 2018.
  • Nearly one-fifth voted at in-person early voting sites, a rate that more than doubled since the 2014 elections. In six states, more than half of ballots were cast at in-person early voting sites.

Military and Overseas Voting

  • More than 350,000 Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act (UOCAVA) voters participated in the 2018 Midterm Elections.
  • The number of ballots transmitted to UOCAVA voters increased by more than 50 percent over the 2014 Midterm Election.
  • Ballot transmission increasingly occurs electronically rather than through postal mail, while postal mail was the most common mode of ballot return.
  • Overall, five percent of ballots returned by UOCAVA voters were rejected, most commonly because they were received after state deadlines.

Polling Places and Poll Workers

  • Almost one-third of states have vote centers or allow voters to cast ballots at any polling place in their jurisdiction.
  • Recruiting adequate numbers of election workers continued to be a challenge for election officials. Nearly 70 percent of responding jurisdictions reporting that it was “very difficult” or “somewhat difficult” to obtain a sufficient number of election workers.

Election Technology

  • Nationwide, jurisdictions reported deploying 334,422 pieces of equipment to cast and tabulate votes in the 2018 Midterm Elections.
  • The most commonly-used equipment types are optical or digital scanners and Ballot Marking Devices (BMDs).
  • More than 90 percent of election jurisdictions use voting machines that produce some form of paper backup.
  • The usage of e-poll books among jurisdictions increased by nearly 50 percent between the 2014 and 2018 Midterm Elections. More than a quarter of all jurisdictions used electronic poll books in 2018.

Post-Election Auditing and Recounts

  • All states have a mechanism for conducting recounts to ensure that ballots were counted correctly.
  • Most states (78.2 percent) require some kind of post-election audit.
  • About half of states conduct election audits of voting machines every election.
  • Only twelve states do not require any type of election audit.

The EAC conducts the EAVS to meet its Help America Vote Act of 2002 mandate to serve as a national clearinghouse and resource for the compilation of information with respect to the administration of federal elections. Additionally, the EAVS fulfills EAC data collection requirements contained in both the National Voter Registration Act (NVRA) and the UOCAVA.

 

 

 

Election Security Updates

The House Administration Committee approved the Securing America’s Federal Elections Act in a 6-3 party-line vote. The bill, would establish cybersecurity safeguards, such as prohibiting machines from being connected to the internet in any way and outlawing voting machines from being manufactured in a foreign country. It also authorizes $600 million in funding for the Election Assistance Commission to give to states to increase security standards through the fiscal 2020 financial services and general government funding bill. The House Appropriations Committee approved that spending bill, with the election funds, earlier this month.

Over in the Senate, Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minnesota) the top Democrat on the Rules Committee tried to bring forward an election security bill, the Election Security Act. The bill would require a paper trail and would provide security grants to the state. The bill was blocked by Sen. James Lankford (R-Oklahoma) who has worked with Klobuchar on bipartisan elections legislation.

“I find myself at odds today with a partner in this … we have worked together in a very nonpartisan way to be able to resolve this issue. I think we still can resolve this and we can actually get a result, but a partisan proposal will not get us an end results where both parties come together and get to resolve this,” Lankford said from the Senate floor according to The Hill. 

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-California) announced this week that Congress will receive an election security briefing from administration officials in July.

“Next month we will take further steps to harden our democratic institutions against attacks, and on July 10 we will receive the all-member election security briefing we requested from the administration so we can continue to protect the American people,” Pelosi said during a press conference according to The Hill.

2020 Candidates on Election Issues

This week, as part of her platform, Democratic candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Massachusetts) released a plan that would create new standards for how federal elections are conducted.

As part of the proposal, intended to expand voting access and strengthen election security, Warren would create a new federal agency, the Secure Democracy Administration, the New York Times reports. She would replace every voting machine across the country with modern equipment and would require the use of a uniform federal ballot. She would also impose uniform standards on election rules, requiring all states to have automatic voter registration and same-day registration, early voting and voting by mail.

Election News This Week

This week, Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose launched a program that will enlist the help of community and social service groups to find inactive voters who are at risk of being removed from the state’s voter rolls. LaRose is asking all 88 county boards of elections to send the secretary’s office names for a “registration reset list” that will share with local organizations that work with populations vulnerable to being removed. “I want to partner with some of these community organizations that are, in many cases, better equipped than any government office to actually go out and find people in the communities, because they are local, on-the-ground, grassroots organizations,” LaRose told the Associated Press.

Well this isn’t lucky. As it currently stands, the Ohio 2020 primary will be March 17 and that has officials in Cleveland concerned because the city is known for its large and boisterous St. Patrick’s Day celebrations. Cuyahoga County elections officials noticed the date and have discussed internally the challenges it might create, Anthony Perlatti, director of the board of elections told The Cleveland Plain Dealer. “We haven’t put much thought into it because we’re kind of hoping it doesn’t happen,” Perlatti told the paper. Initial concerns include polling-place logistics — downtown polling places may have to be closed for logistical and security reasons. There are also concerns about drunk people and parking. “Voting probably will not be the first thing on many people’s minds that day,” Perlatti said. “They’re going to have their day planned out with friends and family, and maybe they’ll be able to squeeze voting in, but who knows.”

It’s not an “I Voted” sticker, but this is a fun story. A new law in Iowa requires county elections officials to print the county seal on vote-by-mail ballot envelopes. Problem is, not all counties have a seal. They may have a logo, but under Iowa code a seal is different and has different requirements. County Deputy Auditor Jenny Hillary told KCRG she spent about 10 weeks creating a seal with other county officials. She said, “I think a lot of other auditors thought they had a seal too and then when you start reading the Iowa code it says it’s supposed to have the word ‘county’ spelled out or abbreviated (and) the word ‘Iowa.'” An IT worker actually did the design work which saved the county the costs of contracting out the design. The county supervisors approved the seal this week and Hillary said she’s already sent ballots with the new seal to the printer.

Wooo! We’ll take a whole roll of these! The Manatee County Supervisor of Elections and State College of Florida’s Graphic Design Program teamed up to create a new “I Voted” sticker exclusively for the 2020 election year. Students from a graphic design class submitted their creations for Supervisor Mike Bennett’s review. “We will print more than 500,000 stickers for all three elections in 2020,” Bennett said according to the Herald Tribune. “SCF approached us last year asking for an opportunity to create a future ‘I Voted’ sticker. With 2020 being a presidential election year, we thought that would be the best time to showcase a student’s talents to Manatee County voters.”

Personnel News: Kendra Lane has been appointed co-director of elections for the state of Missouri. Sandra Milburn, training officer at the Kentucky state board of elections, will join the secretary of state’s election office as deputy chief election administrator. Wyoming Secretary of State Edward Buchanan will be on the job for a bit longer after he was passed over for a judgeship. Tonya Barnes is the new Pittsburg County, Oklahoma elections secretary. Lake County, Ohio elections board Chairman Dale Fellows has been awarded the 2019 Pat Wolfe Election Official of the Year Award by Secretary of State Frank LaRose. London Twp., Michigan Clerk Lisa M. Francis has reconsidered her resignation and will stay on the job until the end of her term. Election manager Melissa Morton is the new registrar of voters in Charlottesville, Virginia. Alabama Secretary of State John Merrill is running for the U.S. Senate.

In Memoriam: Former Belmont County, Ohio Elections Director Bill Shubat died on June 24. He was 61. Shubat retired from the board of elections in January after 24 years with the BOE. Before joining the Belmont County BOE, Shubat worked in the secretary of state’s office. “Fortunately for everybody in Belmont County who has an interest in a fair and accurate election process, he graciously agreed to begin working at the Board of Elections here in Belmont County,” BOE Member Michael Shaheen told the Times Leader. “He was always able to navigate the waters so as to be mindful of everyone’s political affiliations and allegiance while always keeping politics out of his job as a director of the board of elections. Board member Robert Quirk told the paper that Shubat was instrumental in instituting new security requirements after the 2016 election. “When he was in charge, there was a feeling that there were going to be no problems,” Quirk said. “You had a tremendous air of confidence … that we were going to get through the elections, and the elections would be fairly-run without difficulty.”

Legislative Updates

Arizona: The Maricopa County Board of Supervisors have approved a $6.1 million contract to update the county’s vote-counting system. The board also approved the creation of a new position, an executive director of elections, that will report the board and the county recorder.

California: The Assembly Elections and Redistricting Committee has approved ACA 6 by a 6 to 1 vote. Under the proposed legislation Californians would vote on an amendment that would allow those still on parole to regain their right to vote.

Delaware: Legislators in The First State are considering a bill that would drop the requirement that voters provide an excuse before being able to cast an absentee ballot.

Georgia: Georgia lawmakers are looking into the possibility of allowing some non-violent felony offenders to vote. The “Senate Study Committee on Revising Voting Rights for Nonviolent Felony Offenders” will review the current law and how it affects “reintegrating persons back into society,” according to a release from the state Senate.

Hawaii: Gov. David Ige has signed the all-mail elections bill into law as well as an automatic recount bill.

Massachusetts: Secretary of the Commonwealth William Galvin and Attorney General Maura Healey spoke to legislators about a bill that would allow for same-day registration.

Michigan: Gov. Gretchen Whitmer has signed Senate Bill 150 into law which includes $2.5 million for the secretary of state’s office to implement parts of the voter-approved Proposal 3. The bill includes $750,000 to implement automatic voter registration, $750,000 for education and training, $1 million for an absentee counter voting board and $500,000 for technology costs.

New Hampshire: The Senate is considering a bill that would end The Granite State’s participation in the Interstate Voter Registration Crosscheck. HB 315, which repeals New Hampshire’s participation in Crosscheck, does not specify a replacement, nor does it mandate the secretary of state even participate in any voter verification program.

New York: The Legislature has approved a bill that would include the SUNY and CUNY systems as voter registration locations under the state’s Motor Voter law.

North Carolina: The House has unanimously approved HB 19 which would allow counties to continue to use DRE voting machines through the next general election. The current deadline to switch to a paper-based system is December. The bill gives local elections officials the option of asking the State Board of Elections for a reprieve in purchasing new equipment.

Rhode Island: By a unanimous vote, the House has approved moving the state’s primary to the eighth Tuesday before the general election which would finally bring Rhode Island in compliance with federal election laws that require UOCAVA ballots to be mailed 45 days before a federal election.

The Legislature is considering a bill supported by the state board of elections that would place restrictions on write-ins. If approved, state and local boards would only be required to tally write-in votes for individuals who filed their notices of intent in advance.

Legal Updates

Arizona: The Arizona Libertarian Party is asking the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to determine how the vacancy left by Sen. John McCain will be filled. The plaintiffs want the court to order a special election to fill the seat.

Colorado: Gunnison County District Court Judge D. Cory Jackson has ruled that a lower court erred when it found Marie Rossmiller guilty of the misdemeanor charge of voting in the wrong precinct. He has sent the case back to the lower court for a new verdict.

Indiana: The National Election Defense Coalition is suing Indiana Secretary of State Connie Lawson alleging she’s violated state law in denying public record requests since September for her communications about election security with the National Association of Secretaries of State. The coalition argues that Lawson’s public statements have downplayed the vulnerability of election systems.

Iowa: Arguments began in Polk County District Court over House File 516 which was approved in 2017. The law was intended to “modernize election procedures and, with respect to voter verification, ensure the integrity of and instill public confidence in all elections in this state,” Matthew Gannon, an assistant attorney general, said during opening statements according to the Des Moines Register. Bruce Spiva, an attorney representing the plaintiffs, said during opening statements that the law “erects significant barriers,” particularly for voters who are young, elderly, poor, lacking education, minorities, women and Democrats. “There is no crisis that required this measure,” Spiva said according to the paper. “The state should not put unnecessary hurdles in front of the ballot box.”

Mississippi: Former Canton City Clerk Valerie Smith has pleaded guilty to violation of voter registration statues. She received one year of probation and was ordered to pay a fine to the county.

New Jersey: A federal grand jury has convicted longtime Hoboken political Frank Raia of vote-by-mail fraud in connection to the 2013 municipal elections.

Tech Thursday

Websites: Congratulations to the Bipartisan Policy Center and the launch of their redesigned website this week.

Washington: The State of Washington is moving forward with plans to use its new $9.5 million voter registration system — VoteWA — despite concerns expressed by some county elections officials that the system is not ready for prime time. During a test of the system earlier this year, counties found a host of problems such as missing apartment numbers and the systems inability to translate materials in the five required languages.  According to The Seattle Times, the secretary of state’s office said those problems have been solved, but some counties are still creating work arounds in preparation of the August 6 primary. Assistant Secretary of State Mark Neary, who is one of the project leaders that he understands counties might be nervous, but “I’m also confident in the VoteWA system and being able to conduct our primary,” Neary told the paper.

Opinions This Week

National Opinions: Vote-by-mail | Election security, II, III, IV, V | Automatic voter registration | Voting Rights Act, II | Voter suppression | Same day registration | Data

Florida: Voter suppression | Election security | Early voting

Georgia: Primary date

Illinois: Voter registration centers

Iowa: Suffrage

Kansas: Ranked choice voting

Missouri: Primaries

Montana: Secretary of state

New Hampshire: Voters with disabilities

New York: Election reform

North Carolina: Election security

North Dakota: Election process

Ohio: Election security

Pennsylvania: Suffrage

Washington: Paid postage

West Virginia: Automatic voter registration

Upcoming Events

National Association of Secretaries Of State — The National Association of Secretaries of State will hold their annual summer conference in late June, early July in New Mexico. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registrations. When: June 30-July 3. Where: Santa Fe, New Mexico.

International Association of Government Officials — “Educate-Elevate-Energize-Engage” is the theme of this year’s annual conference. The conference will include numerous education sessions and workshops as well as a visit to the NASA Houston Space Center. Where: Houston. When: July 11-17.

National Association of Counties — NACo’s 2019 Annual Conference will be held in Clark County (Las Vegas). Although the schedule and keynote speakers are still being hammered out there will be two symposiums on disaster management including an interactive roundtable. When: July 12-15. Where: Las Vegas.

National Association of State Election Directors — The NASED Summer Conference will be held in Austin, Texas, July 14-16, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Conference of State Legislatures: NCSL’s Legislative Summit will feature numerous elections-related sessions include several about redistricting, voter registration, infrastructure and the Census. And if that wasn’t enough, Dolly Parton will be one of the featured keynote speakers.  When: August 5-8. Where: Nashville.

Election Center 35th Annual National Conference: This year’s Conference attendees will be inspired and energized as we head into the final stretch of the 2019 Election year. We will share substantive elections issues including crucial critical infrastructure information, new election initiatives and tons of practical and meaningful election administration tools and resources including the newest innovations and ideas to help election officials as the 2020 presidential year quickly approaches. When: Aug. 17-24. Where: Orlando.

Job Postings This Week

electionlineWeekly publishes election administration job postings each week as a free service to our readers. To have your job listed in the newsletter, please send a copy of the job description, including a web link to mmoretti@electionline.org.  Job postings must be received by 5pm on Wednesday in order to appear in the Thursday newsletter. Listings will run for three weeks or till the deadline listed in the posting.

Bilingual Resources and Marketing Specialist, Gwinnett County, Georgia —  Gwinnett County Voter Registration and Elections is responsible for planning and organizing all election voter-related activities and assist Gwinnett’s cities and special districts with election preparations. The division is comprised of staff that are proud to be part of a team that works together to assure that every vote counts. This position will be responsible for marketing and outreach for our Elections Division. The incumbent will create marketing material, work with community partners/organizations and conduct outreach related to Gwinnett County’s Election Division and the Bilingual Election Law (Sec. 203 of the Voting Rights Act). The incumbent must be proficient in oral, written and reading comprehension of the Spanish language. The primary responsibility for this position will be to educate and inform various community organizations, registered and prospective voters about election processes in both English and Spanish. The incumbent will also be required to set up and take down tables, display boards and various marketing materials for public events. Salary: $42,1620 $48,486. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Business Analyst, Wisconsin Elections Commission — This position is responsible for understanding, applying, and documenting the Wisconsin Elections Commission’s operational requirements and IT development.  The Elections Business Analyst plays a critical role ensuring that business requirements are accurately translated into development tasks for the agency’s IT developers. The Business Analyst also ensures that IT development team needs are clearly conveyed to business team members. Finally, the Business Analyst ensures that IT development tasks are completely and accurately documented.  This position supports the WisVote statewide voter registration database, as well as other information systems used to facilitate elections in the State of Wisconsin. This position plays an important role in supporting the IT backbone of Wisconsin’s elections, ensuring that both election officials and voters have the tools necessary to conduct and participate in fair and secure elections. Salary: $54,080 and $68,640. Deadline: July 8. Application: For the complete listing and to apply, click here.

Customer Support Consultant, Hart InterCivic— The Customer Support Consultant is responsible for providing application and hardware support to Hart InterCivic customers via telephone and email for all Hart InterCivic products.  The Support Consultant is also responsible for monitoring all requests to ensure efficient, effective resolution. The successful CSC will work directly with customers and other staff members. The position is responsible for responding to customer contacts, dealing with issues in a professional manner, providing technical direction to customers in a manner they can understand and being a customer advocate.  The CSC must have outstanding written and verbal communication skills. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Election Coordinator, Solano County, California— The Elections Coordinator is a supervisor who is charged with successfully overseeing a specific election function – this could be either Voter Registration, Vote by Mail, Candidate Services, or Poll Places/Poll Workers.  Each of the four Coordinators within our office are rotated every four years for cross-training and expanding job knowledge. Additional duties involve participating in developing, updating and implementing office procedures to comply with Federal and State laws; training staff and potentially poll workers; working with community stakeholders in achieving our mission; or coordinating the work of contractors that assist with our operation.  The Ideal candidates will have experience in conducting elections and supervising employees. Skills in Microsoft Office applications including Access and Excel; Geographic information systems such as ArcMap; or experience with web design and adobe software packages are beneficial. Salary: $33.41 – $40.61 hourly. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Lead Specialist, Douglas County, Colorado— The Elections Lead Specialist assists in the supervision and coordination of elections operations, staff, and election judges including voter services, mail ballot processing and the conduct of elections. The objective of this position is to perform a variety of functions and diverse support roles on a routine basis. Mail Ballot Processing responsibilities are prioritized over other duties during election cycles, which may increase or decrease dramatically depending on the Elections cycle. In the absence of the Operations Manager, assumes responsibility for front-line functions associated with elections operations. This is a highly visible position requiring exceptional leadership, organizational, and communication skills. Salary: $3,550-$4,438 monthly. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Specialist, Wisconsin Elections Commission — This position functions as part of the elections administration team and is a resource for the public on election-related laws and procedures. The Elections Specialists regularly conduct public outreach, education, training, technical assistance workshops, seminars, and certification classes. This position is also responsible for core election administration tasks, including, but not limited to review of state and federal candidate ballot access documents, ballot design and review, and canvass of election results. This positions also works in, and provides services regarding, Wisconsin’s statewide voter registration system, which is a database of voter and election information as well as a primary tool for administration of elections in the state. This position is a contact for county and municipal clerks to provide customer service, training, and guidance in the administration of elections using WisVote. Salary: $17.96 and $29.62 per hour.  Deadline: July 7. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Election Specialist I, Douglas County, Colorado — This position is focused on routine customer service and general office/clerical support including data entry, communications, and processing mail. This is a support role capable of performing a variety of tasks, with problem solving abilities, managing multiple competing responsibilities and prioritizing to maintain a continuous flow of election office operations. This is a visible and crucial position requiring exceptional computer, customer service, and communication skills. This is a benefited part-time position and benefits are pro-rated to 30 hours per week. This is an open until filled posting, review of applications and interviews will begin immediately and continue until suitable candidates are selected. Salary: $16.40-$20.50/hourly. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Election Specialist II, Douglas County, Colorado— The Election Specialist II is responsible for routine support services related to temporary employees, training, Voter Service and Polling Centers, mail ballot processing, voter registration, and customer service. This position contributes to the department’s achievement of delivering efficient, transparent, fair and accurate elections as well as performs other projects as assigned. This position requires technical work in a lead role capable of performing a variety of complex tasks, with solving problem abilities, managing multiple competing tasks and prioritizing to maintain a continuous flow of operations and temporary support. This is a visible and crucial position requiring previous elections experience, and exceptional computer, customer service, and communication skills. Please note this position is posted as open until filled, review of applications will begin immediately and continue until a suitable candidate is selected. Salary: $3,214 – $4,017 Monthly. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Program Associate, Elections Policy, The Democracy Fund — Democracy Fund’s Elections team is seeking a Program Associate to promote and advocate for national issues in voting policy, particularly election law and election cybersecurity policy. This role presents a unique opportunity to blend philanthropy, policy development, and legislative advocacy. The successful candidate will be passionate about educating leaders, officials, and the public on the urgent need for election reform and the danger that attacks on the electoral process pose to our democracy. he Program Associate will focus on increasing the public’s trust in elections, improving election security, advancing policies and practices that make elections more accessible, and reducing attempts to change election law for partisan benefit. Day-to-day tasks will include grantmaking, policy work, advocacy, coalition and relationship building, thought leadership, and developing innovative approaches to reduce real or perceived threats to American elections. We are looking for candidates who are determined to help our democracy work better. Strong candidates will possess several years of experience working on voting or election policy and leading advocacy or legislative policy change. The successful candidate will have a track record of working well with others to get things done in a complex, fast-paced environment and will thrive as part of a small, highly collaborative team. The Program Associate will report to the Associate Director, Elections. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Project Manager, Hart InterCivic— Project Managers at Hart InterCivic are highly motivated “self-starters” who are enthusiastic about providing exceptional customer service. Working with other members of the Professional Services and Operations teams, the Project Manager directs activity, solves problems, and develops lasting and strong relationships with our customers. Hart InterCivic’s unique and industry known culture of innovation, transparency, and customer-centric focus creates an environment where team members will continually grow and be challenged to develop their careers. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Product Manager, Hart InterCivic — as Product Manager, you will join a team that is charged with product planning, design, and execution throughout the lifecycle of Hart’s products, in support of the company’s overall strategy and goals. This includes: gathering, validating, and prioritizing internal and external customer needs; documenting and communicating product and technical requirements; gathering market and competitive intelligence; supporting the certification, sales, and marketing teams. The Product Manager must possess a unique blend of business and technical savvy – with experience in elections technology or other government-oriented products preferred.  To succeed in this role, the ideal candidate must spend time in the market to understand its unique attributes; demonstrate competence with specialized hardware and software; and find innovative solutions for the broader market. The Product Manager plays a key role in helping others to understand the product positioning, key benefits, and target customer, as well as providing advanced subject matter expertise in using the company’s products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Research Scientist, MIT Election Data and Science Lab— MEDSL seeks a research scientist  to oversee the data science workflow of the lab’s election-related data collection, processing, and dissemination efforts.  MEDSL aims to improve the democratic experience for all U.S. voters by applying scientific principles to how elections are studied and administered. Responsibilities include assisting the director with designing and implementing research projects; gathering and analyzing data, designing research protocols, and documenting results; managing data science and quality control for the 2018 release of the Elections Performance Index (EPI); acquiring data from government sources and designing protocols to update indicators not provided by government sources; assisting with redistricting data collection/dissemination efforts; working with web designers to update EPI website and creating original content for MEDSL website; onboarding and monitoring the work of students/research support associates; tracking scholarship in the field of election science; and performing other data science/administrative/reporting duties as assigned. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Software Sales Specialist, VOTEC— VOTEC’s Sales Specialist is responsible for creating news sales with prospects and existing clients in targeted areas in the US. We are looking for an election professional comfortable using insight and consultative selling techniques to create interest that offers unique solutions on their operations, which link back to VOTEC’s solutions. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Marketplace

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In Focus This Week

June 20, 2019

June 20, 2019

In Focus This Week

Exit Interview: Elaine Manlove
Life’s a beach for outgoing Delaware elections commissioner

By M. Mindy Moretti
Electionline.org

For two decades, Elaine Manlove has worked in elections in Delaware. She started out as director of the Department of Elections in New Castle County for eight years and for the past 12 years she’s been The First State’s Election Commissioner. June 30th will be her last day.

“On behalf of the EAC, I want to congratulate Elaine Manlove on her retirement and thank her for her leadership and dedication to running excellent elections in Delaware,” said U.S. Election Assistance Commission Chairwoman Christy McCormick. “I also want to extend special thanks and appreciation for her service to the EAC Standards Board over many years. She will be missed and we wish her all the best in her next adventure!”

It was while Manlove was in office that Delaware set the wheels in motion for what many now call automatic voter registration. The state created a system that allows voters to have registration information transmitted in real-time from the Division of Motor Vehicles to each county elections office.

“Elaine and I have spent many years together in the wonderful world of election administration,” said Maryland Administrator of Elections Linda Lamone. “Throughout that time she has been a valued ally and neighbor. Elaine graciously worked with the Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration to help it move towards electronic transmission of voter registration data to the Maryland State Board of Elections.

During her tenure Delaware became second state to join ERIC and Manlove also served on the ERIC board.

In addition, Delaware recently implemented iVOTE.DE.GOV, a voter portal allowing citizens to complete voter registration applications online, update their voter registration information, request an absentee ballot, track that ballot once it has been returned and find who represents them as well as their polling place.

“We’ve all benefitted from the work Elaine did in Delaware and we’ve all enjoyed Elaine’s sharp sense of humor and joie de vivre,” said Keith Ingram, president of the National Association of State Election Directors and director of elections for the Texas secretary of state. “The voters of Delaware – and NASED – have been lucky to have her!”

Thanks for everything Elaine! We’ll miss you. Enjoy the beach!

Why have you decided to retire at this time?
First of all, I’m old and it’s time for someone else to take over.  My term ends in 2020, but I don’t think it’s fair to the next person to be on the learning curve in a Presidential Election year.  In addition, I have grandchildren and I would like to spend more time with them. Also, I live at the beach and never get to sit on the beach during the week!

What are you most proud of during your tenure as Delaware Election Commissioner?
I have a great IT team and because of them, we were able to solve a problem that I thought was unique to Delaware – not getting everything from DMV.  We developed what we call e-signature so that all voter registrations and declinations would come electronically from DMV to the Elections office in real time.  We saw it only as a solution to our problem and we never envisioned that it would morph into Automatic Voter Registration. I still think e-signature is better because voters have completed everything when they leave DMV.  We don’t have to send out follow up information which is an added expense and not always effective. On the e-signature platform, we built online voter registration and also eliminated all paper applications that come to our offices by scanning in the signed application and electronically linking it to the application in the system.  These changes dramatically improved the way we do business.

More recently, there was a huge task on my to-do list that had been on my radar for some time and was finally completed on my way out the door!  We purchased a new voting system, electronic poll books, a new absentee system and are moving our voter registration system from the state’s aging mainframe.  Delaware is no longer one of five states without a paper trail!!

With all due respect to Oregon, Delaware under your leadership really lead the way for automatic voter registration. What are your thoughts on how far we’ve come on AVR and how far we still have to go?
As I said, I believe Delaware was the frontrunner in AVR even if we don’t automatically register everyone.  Motor voter is federal law but we need to make it easy for everyone and that starts with DMV. DMV is the touch point for most citizens and it often seems like they are the point of contact for anything and everything that government needs to get to citizens.  I know e-signature makes it easier for the staff at DMV. It’s just a win-win: a cost saver, a time-saver, and a simple and efficient way to register citizens to vote. I would love to sit down with every DMV director in the country and explain that this makes it easier for their agencies.  The amazing DMV Director that worked with us saw that right away!

How would you recommend getting elections officials in smaller or more remote jurisdictions to get involved in the conversation of where modernization is going nationally?
I believe organizations like The Election Center are critical to smaller jurisdictions.  When I started in Elections 20 years ago, I knew absolutely nothing about how the election system worked.  I had been a political volunteer and my only involvement was getting “my team” to the polling place. I never thought about who hired those poll workers or how those machines got to the polling place.  I learned first from the team in my office, but then also from other election officials around the country. For instance, I copied Student Poll Workers from Connie Schmidt. I learned as much during lunchtime discussions at events as I did during the formal sessions.  Election officials are happy to share what works for them and I was happy to take what would work in Delaware.

Is there anything that you weren’t able to accomplish during your years of service that you wish you had?
I wish I had been able to upgrade more of the staff members in our offices.  Unfortunately, the world thinks we work only 2 days every other year. Our staffers no longer file papers – everything is electronic so a different skill-set is required.  I have worked on many upgrades but there are many more that need to be done.

If you could design the perfect elections system, what would it look like?
I think it would look like what Delaware just purchased.  We have always voted on a full-face ballot – first the old lever machines, then a full-faced DRE.  Our new system has a full-faced ballot as well as a paper trail. It’s the best of both worlds – no culture shock of handing a Delaware voter a piece of paper and telling them to fill in the circle!!  Also, electronic poll books have been on my wish list since the initial HAVA funding. We now have them!

Any words of advice for someone just getting started in the elections business?
Learn from those around you – first in your own office.  I was fortunate to start with a great team in New Castle County who were already ahead of the curve.  Also, interact with your peers. I learned so much from people who are doing my job in other states. It’s invaluable – no need to make mistakes that someone else already has!  And be open and honest with the press.

What’s next for you, other than sleep in in on Election Day?
It will be a little scary not to have firm deadlines!  I plan to spend much more time with my family, do more traveling and be able to sit on the beach and read a book whenever I want!  I do hope to keep in touch with my “Elections” friends. It’s been a way of life for me for 20 years and one I know I will miss!

 

Election Security Updates

Led by Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison, 22 Democratic state attorneys general sent a letter to the leaders from each party of the Senate Appropriations Committee and the Senate Rules Committee demanding that they work together to bolster election security in the states.

“Our state and local election officials are on the front-lines of the fight to protect our election infrastructure, but they lack the resources necessary to combat a sophisticated foreign adversary like Russia,” they wrote according to The Hill.

According to The Hill, the letter also asked that Congress “support the establishment of cybersecurity and audit standards for election systems,” and argued that the federal government needs to keep state election officials informed about suspected breaches and other security intelligence.

The war of words over election security legislation continued this week when Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-New York) called out Senate Majority Leader Mitch Mc Connell (R-Kentucky) for his failure to move any of the legislation forward.

“The Republican Senate, Leader McConnell just stands there and twiddles their thumbs and almost says, ‘Come on Putin, let it happen,’” said Schumer, who added that any leader in Congress who doesn’t work to protect the nation’s elections is “abdicating their responsibilities to our grand democracy.”

Schumer said that Democrats have a three-pronged strategy to get the legislation moving:

  • Press McConnell to allow debate on legislation that’s been introduced by holding standalone votes on those bills;
  • Press McConnell to allow votes on amendments for the 2020 defense policy bill; and
  • Push for election security funding as part of negotiations for a two-year deal to life spending ceilings.

Election News This Week

Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson (D) and Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose (R) are joining forces in a quest for civility. The freshman secretaries will work with the National Institute for Civil Discourse and co-chair a civility task force. At the upcoming National Association of Secretaries of State meeting they plan to invite other secretaries to join them. “Civility is not just about being nicer to each other. That’s part of it,” LaRose said according to The Columbus Dispatch. “But it’s about creating the opportunity to govern. … We want to lead the way and we want to encourage our fellow secretaries of state to lead the way in speaking out against misinformation and some of the partisan hyperbole around elections administration.” Secretaries of state who sign on to the task force will be able to decide how they pursue civility in their own state, but LaRose said he has some ideas, including offering reporters a chance to watch a mock election to better understand election security and running “mythbusting” operations that seek to dispel inaccurate claims about elections. “My hope is we can rise above the level of discourse our politics has oftentimes has sunk to and at the moment of this uniquely contentious presidential election cycle lead the way to collaboration and restoring the public’s faith in democracy,” Benson said according to the paper. No word yet though on whether the civility will be put aside for just a few hours on Nov. 30 when the Buckeyes take on the Wolverines on the gridiron.

It seems like just about every year in electionline Weekly’s annual In & Out list we make a joke about lever voting machines finally being out. Well, this year may finally be the last year we can make that joke because the town of Middletown, Connecticut has retired its last working lever voting machine. “The people who invented those must have been brilliant,” Bobby Russo who used to service the city’s lever-voting machines said to the Middletown Press. Like many of his generation, Russo looks fondly on the lever-voting machine days. “When they voted, and heard the bell go off, you would hear that ‘Bing!’ And they knew that they voted,” Russo said.

It is estimated that approximately 300,000 women in Utah who are eligible to voter aren’t registered. In recognition of the centennial celebration of Suffrage and the 150th anniversary of suffrage in Utah, the Utah League of Women Voters and Voterise have partnered together in effort to get 20,000 more women registered before the November 2020 election. The groups plan to recruit 1,000 ambassadors and train them in voter registration techniques.

Well this is certainly going to be featured in a future “Polling Place Profile” in electionline Weekly. The Barton County, Kansas commission recently approved to pave the parking lot at the Sheriff’s Firing Range so the building may be used as a polling place. When discussing the project, Commission Chairwoman Jennifer Schwartz confirmed that the firing range would not be used during voting times. And during the time of voting it would not be used as a firing range,” Commission Chairwoman Jennifer Schartz commented. “Exactly right,” County Clerk Donna Zimmerman said according to the Great Bend Tribune.

It’s not the heat, it’s the humidity! Or in the case of a polling place, in August, in Meridian, Mississippi it will be both if something isn’t done to fix the site’s air conditioning. “My poll workers almost had a heat stroke [in 2018],” said Election Commission Gloria Dancy. “It’s an emergency. That’s the reason I’m here today. I can’t ask these people to go in that building in August.” Supervisor Joe Norwood acknowledged the problem. “We have to do whatever we have to do — whether it’s moving in portable air conditioners (or) something of that nature, we’re going to make it happen.”

A hearty get well to Ionia County, Michigan Clerk Janae Cooper who broke her leg while riding a motorcycle.

Personnel News: Linda Lindberg, Arlington County, Virginia registrar since 2003 and with the office since 1994 is retiring. Maryanne Capasso is the new Lakehurst, New Jersey city clerk. Paul Lopez was officially declared the winner and is the new Denver clerk and recorder. Montana Secretary of State Corey Stapleton has announced that instead of running for governor he will instead run for the U.S. House. Delaware Gov. John Carney has recommended New Castle County Elections Director Anthony Albence to take over as the state election commissioner following the retirement of Commissioner Elaine Manlove. Washington County, Indiana Clerk Sarah Milligan has resigned.

Research and Report Summaries

The Congressional Research Service (CRS) released a report and accompanying “in-focus” brief on the U.S. Election Assistance Commission (EAC) last week. The report, The U.S. Election Assistance Commission: Overview and Selected Issues for Congress, provides an overview of the EAC’s duties, structure, and funding over time, as well as a brief history of the agency. The report further summarizes recent relevant legislative activity, including proposals to terminate the agency, expand its authority, and change the way it works, teeing up issues for the current Congress to consider.

CRS is a part of the Library of Congress, providing legislative research and analysis for congressional committees and Members of Congress. In September 2018, CRS began making its reports available to the public online.

The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights released a briefing report last week on collateral consequences imposed on persons with criminal convictions. The report, Collateral Consequences: The Crossroads of Punishment, Redemption, and the Effects on Communities, includes a chapter on voting and civic participation. The chapter explores policy variation on voting rights restoration among the states, estimates of those disenfranchised today and in recent years, the history of felony disenfranchisement in the country, arguments for and against the practice, and legal challenges.

The report’s recommendations relevant to election administration and policy include:

  • The United States Department of Justice should issue guidance sharing best practices related to collateral consequences of criminal convictions, clarifying at minimum the following points:
    1. States should consider restoration of the right to vote to all people who have been released from incarceration or are on probation/parole and are currently disenfranchised because of criminal convictions. Denying the right to vote does not serve the public safety or interest.
    2. States should notify people disenfranchised because of a criminal conviction when their right to vote is or can be restored, if restored automatically when that occurs, or what steps they must undertake to restore their right to vote. In states where the right to vote is restored upon release from incarceration or completion of supervision, an opportunity to register to vote and assistance to complete the process should be included as part of the completion of the exit process from prison, parole, or probation.

(Research and Report Summaries are written by David Kuennen.)

Legislative Updates

Louisiana: The Associated Press reports this week that what little money lawmakers had put aside to purchase new statewide voting equipment has been reshuffled and moved elsewhere in what the AP called “an election-year legislative scramble to boost spending on education, public safety and health care.” Lawmakers previously had put $2 million in state financing into a voting technology fund, as a down payment on a machine replacement expected to cost tens of millions of dollars, now even that money is gone. Work will begin anew in 2020 to find the funding.

Maine: Gov. Janet Mills has signed a bill into law that will allow for automatic voter registration. Maine will automatically register voters who do business with the Bureau of Motor Vehicles by 2022 under the bill, which has a one-time cost of $140,000 in federal funds.

Also in Maine, this week the House joined the Senate in approving a bill that would allow the state to expand the use of ranked choice voting to presidential primary and general elections.

Massachusetts: By an 11-2 vote, the Springfield City Council approved an ordinance that, if funded, would mean that postcards will be sent to all Springfield voters ahead of municipal elections to remind them of the upcoming election. Under the ordinance, registered voters will receive a city notice no later than 20 days prior to a municipal election that will include the date of the election, the polling location of the household, and the elective offices that will appear on the ballot. However, Mayor Domenic J. Sarno has vetoed the ordinance comparing to public campaign financing.

Nevada: Gov. Steve Sisolak has signed AB345 into law. The bill will implement same-day voter registration and allow counties to move to a vote center system if they choose to. The bill also moves forward automatic voter registration, which was approved by voters in 2018.

New Mexico: The Albuquerque city council has rejected a bill to amend a city ordinance to allow for the implementation of ranked choice voting. The vote was 5-4. That being said, voters will be asked in November if they want to move the city to a ranked choice system beginning in 2021.

New York: The Senate has approved a bill that would allow for automatic voter registration. The bill would make voter registration an “opt-out” option when interacting with state agencies and the Department of Motor Vehicles. The bill next moves to the full Assembly.

Oregon: Senate Bill 861 is on its way to the full Ways and Means Committee after a subcommittee approved it this week. Under the bill, the state would provide postage-paid return envelopes for all ballots.

Pennsylvania: The State Government Committee has advanced Senate Bill 422 that would create an election law advisory board that would identify statutory language that can be repealed or modified collaborating with agencies and political subdivisions to study election-related issues, studying new election technology, evaluating the electoral process, identifying best practices to ensure voting integrity and efficiency, publishing an annual report on the Pennsylvania Department of State’s website.

West Virginia: Although automatic voter registration was approved several years ago, there was never any money in place to implement it. Now the Legislature, by an 87-9 vote has approved Senate Bill 1015 that gives the secretary of state’s office authority to spend $1.5 million for technology improvements that will allow for AVR.

Legal Updates

Kansas: The ACLU of Kansas has filed a federal lawsuit challenging the state’s 250-foot buffer zone that bans electioneering near polling places during elections. The suit calls the ban unconstitutional.

Massachusetts: U.S. Magistrate Judge Donald Cabell approved a consent decree on a voting rights settlement reached last week that provided options to the city’s current electoral system for the city council and school committee.

Louisiana: Delores “Dee” Handy, 68 of Crowley has been accused by the state attorney general’s office of failing to “mark a ballot in the manner dictated by the when assisting” on two separate occasions.

New Hampshire: The Attorney General’s Office has cleared a mother being investigated for voter fraud because she helped her son with disabilities cast his ballot in 2016.

Also in New Hampshire,  Charles Cartier, Jr., 80, has been charged with knowingly casting ballots in both New Hampshire and in Massachusetts in 2016.

New York: By a 4-3 vote, the New York Court of Appeals has ruled that electronic images of ballots cast should not be accessible to the public through the state’s open record law.

Virginia: The Supreme Court ruled this week that Virginia’s House of Delegates — which has a Republican majority — lacks standing in a gerrymandering case that ruled voting districts in the state were drawn on racial motivations, and that remapping districts is constitutional.

Tech Thursday

Rhode Island: Secretary of State Nellie Gorbea recently announced that a contract has been awarded to Stonewall Solutions to build a new central voter registration system for the state. The current system was designed in 2005. The new system will cost about $520,000 to build and $60,000 to maintain.  

Opinions This Week

National Opinions: Election security, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII, VIII

California: Ranked choice voting

District of Columbia: Felon enfranchisement

Florida: Ex-felon voting rights

Hawaii: Vote by mail

Illinois: Voter registration centers

Louisiana: Election security

Nevada: Election security

New Mexico: Local election act

New York: Ballot lawsuit | Automatic voter registration

North Carolina: Election security, II

Ohio: Election security

Pennsylvania: Election security | Equipment costs | Election reform

Texas: Election dates

Virginia: Election security

Washington: Election security

Wisconsin: Early voting

Upcoming Events

Common Data Formats for Election Systems Webinar — We’ve been talking about common data formats for years, but what are they really? We will discuss the history of their development, benefits and potential use cases. We’ll also provide resources for implementation and how to get started. When: June 21, 12:30 EDT. Where: Online

U.S. Election Assistance Election Data Summit — The U.S. Election Assistance Commission invites you to attend the 2019 Election Data Summit. The event coincides with the release of the 2018 Election Administration and Voting Survey (EAVS) and will feature expert speakers examining how to use data to help America vote. The day’s keynote speakers and panel discussions will include a look at data within the newly released biennial EAVS survey, as well as broader panel conversations covering issues such as how data can be used to address election security, improve voter registration, modernize election management systems, and enact best practices for serving voters covered under the Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting (UOCAVA) Act. Attendees are strongly encouraged to register in advance and arrive on time in order to guarantee entry. The EAC will accommodate as many registrants as possible, but due to strict room occupancy limits, preregistration may not necessarily guarantee entry if the room is at capacity. This event will also be livestreamed at www.eac.gov. When: June 27, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Where: Russel Senate Office Building; Room 301

National Association of Secretaries Of State — The National Association of Secretaries of State will hold their annual summer conference in late June, early July in New Mexico. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registrations. When: June 30-July 3. Where: Santa Fe, New Mexico.

International Association of Government Officials — “Educate-Elevate-Energize-Engage” is the theme of this year’s annual conference. The conference will include numerous education sessions and workshops as well as a visit to the NASA Houston Space Center. Where: Houston. When: July 11-17.

National Association of Counties — NACo’s 2019 Annual Conference will be held in Clark County (Las Vegas). Although the schedule and keynote speakers are still being hammered out there will be two symposiums on disaster management including an interactive roundtable. When: July 12-15. Where: Las Vegas.

National Association of State Election Directors — The NASED Summer Conference will be held in Austin, Texas, July 14-16, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Conference of State Legislatures: NCSL’s Legislative Summit will feature numerous elections-related sessions include several about redistricting, voter registration, infrastructure and the Census. And if that wasn’t enough, Dolly Parton will be one of the featured keynote speakers.  When: August 5-8. Where: Nashville.

Election Center 35th Annual National Conference: This year’s Conference attendees will be inspired and energized as we head into the final stretch of the 2019 Election year. We will share substantive elections issues including crucial critical infrastructure information, new election initiatives and tons of practical and meaningful election administration tools and resources including the newest innovations and ideas to help election officials as the 2020 presidential year quickly approaches. When: Aug. 17-24. Where: Orlando.

Job Postings This Week

electionlineWeekly publishes election administration job postings each week as a free service to our readers. To have your job listed in the newsletter, please send a copy of the job description, including a web link to mmoretti@electionline.org.  Job postings must be received by 5pm on Wednesday in order to appear in the Thursday newsletter. Listings will run for three weeks or till the deadline listed in the posting.

Bilingual Resources and Marketing Specialist, Gwinnett County, Georgia —  Gwinnett County Voter Registration and Elections is responsible for planning and organizing all election voter-related activities and assist Gwinnett’s cities and special districts with election preparations. The division is comprised of staff that are proud to be part of a team that works together to assure that every vote counts. This position will be responsible for marketing and outreach for our Elections Division. The incumbent will create marketing material, work with community partners/organizations and conduct outreach related to Gwinnett County’s Election Division and the Bilingual Election Law (Sec. 203 of the Voting Rights Act). The incumbent must be proficient in oral, written and reading comprehension of the Spanish language. The primary responsibility for this position will be to educate and inform various community organizations, registered and prospective voters about election processes in both English and Spanish. The incumbent will also be required to set up and take down tables, display boards and various marketing materials for public events. Salary: $42,1620 $48,486. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Business Analyst, Wisconsin Elections Commission — This position is responsible for understanding, applying, and documenting the Wisconsin Elections Commission’s operational requirements and IT development.  The Elections Business Analyst plays a critical role ensuring that business requirements are accurately translated into development tasks for the agency’s IT developers. The Business Analyst also ensures that IT development team needs are clearly conveyed to business team members. Finally, the Business Analyst ensures that IT development tasks are completely and accurately documented.  This position supports the WisVote statewide voter registration database, as well as other information systems used to facilitate elections in the State of Wisconsin.  This position plays an important role in supporting the IT backbone of Wisconsin’s elections, ensuring that both election officials and voters have the tools necessary to conduct and participate in fair and secure elections. Salary: $54,080 and $68,640. Deadline: July 8. Application: For the complete listing and to apply, click here.

Communications Coordinator/Assistant, Boulder County, Colorado— assist Communications Specialist with various duties for the Clerk & Recorder office. The bulk of this time will focus on the work of the Elections Division; however, individual will assist in some tasks and communication campaigns that cover Motor Vehicle and Recording divisions. Description of Work: This is an hourly, non-benefited position funded now through early December 2020. Ideal candidate can work between 18-30 / hours week. Hours/days are flexible to work around school or other existing work schedule. Occasional weekend or evening support may be needed.The ideal candidate will have strong communications skills, familiarity with WordPress or similar website editing platforms, have a positive attitude, be able to take initiative, and be relatively outgoing. Great position for anyone interested in elections who is a junior, senior, recent graduate or graduate student in communications, marketing, journalism, political science, or related field. This is an hourly. non-benefited position and is expected to end in December 2020. Work hours are flexible and will average 18 to 30 per week. The position works out of Boulder. Salary: $18-$20/hour. Deadline: June 24. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Customer Support Consultant, Hart InterCivic— The Customer Support Consultant is responsible for providing application and hardware support to Hart InterCivic customers via telephone and email for all Hart InterCivic products.  The Support Consultant is also responsible for monitoring all requests to ensure efficient, effective resolution. The successful CSC will work directly with customers and other staff members. The position is responsible for responding to customer contacts, dealing with issues in a professional manner, providing technical direction to customers in a manner they can understand and being a customer advocate.  The CSC must have outstanding written and verbal communication skills. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Election Coordinator, Solano County, California— The Elections Coordinator is a supervisor who is charged with successfully overseeing a specific election function – this could be either Voter Registration, Vote by Mail, Candidate Services, or Poll Places/Poll Workers.  Each of the four Coordinators within our office are rotated every four years for cross-training and expanding job knowledge. Additional duties involve participating in developing, updating and implementing office procedures to comply with Federal and State laws; training staff and potentially poll workers; working with community stakeholders in achieving our mission; or coordinating the work of contractors that assist with our operation.  The Ideal candidates will have experience in conducting elections and supervising employees. Skills in Microsoft Office applications including Access and Excel; Geographic information systems such as ArcMap; or experience with web design and adobe software packages are beneficial. Salary: $33.41 – $40.61 hourly. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Lead Specialist, Douglas County, Colorado— The Elections Lead Specialist assists in the supervision and coordination of elections operations, staff, and election judges including voter services, mail ballot processing and the conduct of elections. The objective of this position is to perform a variety of functions and diverse support roles on a routine basis. Mail Ballot Processing responsibilities are prioritized over other duties during election cycles, which may increase or decrease dramatically depending on the Elections cycle. In the absence of the Operations Manager, assumes responsibility for front-line functions associated with elections operations. This is a highly visible position requiring exceptional leadership, organizational, and communication skills. Salary: $3,550-$4,438 monthly. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Specialist, Anoka County, Minnesota — Transparent and accurate elections that allow for the genuine expression of the will of the voters are the bedrock of our democracy. The Anoka County Office of Elections and Voter Registration works closely with local jurisdictions to administer elections with integrity, ensuring all eligible voters can register to vote and cast their ballot through an efficient and credible process. The Elections Specialist who joins the Anoka County Elections team will play a critical role supporting the planning, preparation and execution of core election functions, including voter registration, absentee voting and election day activities. The ideal candidate will be familiar with and comfortable using technology. This team player will demonstrate flexibility and an ability to adjust priorities on short notice. The Elections Specialist will have a strong sense of quality customer service and must engage voters, candidates and other stakeholders in a nonpartisan and respectful manner. This full-time, benefit-eligible position is located at the Anoka County Government Center. Salary: $19.10 – $19.67 Hourly. Deadline: June 24. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Specialist, Wisconsin Elections Commission — This position functions as part of the elections administration team and is a resource for the public on election-related laws and procedures. The Elections Specialists regularly conduct public outreach, education, training, technical assistance workshops, seminars, and certification classes. This position is also responsible for core election administration tasks, including, but not limited to review of state and federal candidate ballot access documents, ballot design and review, and canvass of election results. This positions also works in, and provides services regarding, Wisconsin’s statewide voter registration system, which is a database of voter and election information as well as a primary tool for administration of elections in the state. This position is a contact for county and municipal clerks to provide customer service, training, and guidance in the administration of elections using WisVote. Salary: $17.96 and $29.62 per hour. Deadline: July 7. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Election Specialist I, Douglas County, Colorado — This position is focused on routine customer service and general office/clerical support including data entry, communications, and processing mail. This is a support role capable of performing a variety of tasks, with problem solving abilities, managing multiple competing responsibilities and prioritizing to maintain a continuous flow of election office operations. This is a visible and crucial position requiring exceptional computer, customer service, and communication skills. This is a benefited part-time position and benefits are pro-rated to 30 hours per week. This is an open until filled posting, review of applications and interviews will begin immediately and continue until suitable candidates are selected. Salary: $16.40-$20.50/hourly. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Election Specialist II, Douglas County, Colorado— The Election Specialist II is responsible for routine support services related to temporary employees, training, Voter Service and Polling Centers, mail ballot processing, voter registration, and customer service. This position contributes to the department’s achievement of delivering efficient, transparent, fair and accurate elections as well as performs other projects as assigned. This position requires technical work in a lead role capable of performing a variety of complex tasks, with solving problem abilities, managing multiple competing tasks and prioritizing to maintain a continuous flow of operations and temporary support. This is a visible and crucial position requiring previous elections experience, and exceptional computer, customer service, and communication skills. Please note this position is posted as open until filled, review of applications will begin immediately and continue until a suitable candidate is selected. Salary: $3,214 – $4,017 Monthly. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Project Manager, Hart InterCivic— Project Managers at Hart InterCivic are highly motivated “self-starters” who are enthusiastic about providing exceptional customer service. Working with other members of the Professional Services and Operations teams, the Project Manager directs activity, solves problems, and develops lasting and strong relationships with our customers. Hart InterCivic’s unique and industry known culture of innovation, transparency, and customer-centric focus creates an environment where team members will continually grow and be challenged to develop their careers. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Product Manager, Hart InterCivic — as Product Manager, you will join a team that is charged with product planning, design, and execution throughout the lifecycle of Hart’s products, in support of the company’s overall strategy and goals. This includes: gathering, validating, and prioritizing internal and external customer needs; documenting and communicating product and technical requirements; gathering market and competitive intelligence; supporting the certification, sales, and marketing teams. The Product Manager must possess a unique blend of business and technical savvy – with experience in elections technology or other government-oriented products preferred.  To succeed in this role, the ideal candidate must spend time in the market to understand its unique attributes; demonstrate competence with specialized hardware and software; and find innovative solutions for the broader market. The Product Manager plays a key role in helping others to understand the product positioning, key benefits, and target customer, as well as providing advanced subject matter expertise in using the company’s products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Research Scientist, MIT Election Data and Science Lab— MEDSL seeks a research scientist  to oversee the data science workflow of the lab’s election-related data collection, processing, and dissemination efforts.  MEDSL aims to improve the democratic experience for all U.S. voters by applying scientific principles to how elections are studied and administered. Responsibilities include assisting the director with designing and implementing research projects; gathering and analyzing data, designing research protocols, and documenting results; managing data science and quality control for the 2018 release of the Elections Performance Index (EPI); acquiring data from government sources and designing protocols to update indicators not provided by government sources; assisting with redistricting data collection/dissemination efforts; working with web designers to update EPI website and creating original content for MEDSL website; onboarding and monitoring the work of students/research support associates; tracking scholarship in the field of election science; and performing other data science/administrative/reporting duties as assigned. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Software Sales Specialist, VOTEC— VOTEC’s Sales Specialist is responsible for creating news sales with prospects and existing clients in targeted areas in the US. We are looking for an election professional comfortable using insight and consultative selling techniques to create interest that offers unique solutions on their operations, which link back to VOTEC’s solutions. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Marketplace

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In Focus This Week

June 13, 2019

June 13, 2019

In Focus This Week

2019 elections legislation in review
With many Legislatures now done, what happened in 2019

By M. Mindy Moretti
Electionline.org

Although there’s no catchy Alice Cooper song to mark the season, many state Legislatures have finished or are finishing up their work for 2019.

It was a busy year for election legislation with thousands of bills being filed. Bills covered everything from ex-felon voting rights to voter ID to same day registration to what to wear the polls and whether or not you can bring a weapon with you, not matter what you’re wearing.

While some state Legislatures are still in session and there are others that don’t adjourn, we thought now would be a good time to take a look at some of the elections legislation that was on the table this year.  This is just a snapshot of what was happening in the states this year. It’s always good to bookmark the State Elections Legislation Database brought you by our good friends at the National Conference of State Legislatures.

Voter Registration

The TN Legislature put limitations on 3rd-party voter reg groups.

Automatic voter registration. Election day registration. Same day registration. Limits on third-party voter registration groups. There were countless bills regarding some aspect of voter registration this year. After Republican lawmakers threatened a filibuster, a bill that would have allowed automatic voter registration in Connecticut failed at the end of the session. A bill in Kansas for same day registration never got past the committee level. Maine is poised to become the 18th state to allow automatic voter registration. The Nevada Legislature has approved same day registration. In New Mexico, Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham has signed Senate Bill 672 into law that allows for election day registration. The New York Senate is currently considering automatic voter registration.  Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose is working with legislative Republicans and Democrats on automatic voter registration. A bill in South Carolina that would have extended the voter registration deadline initially passed the House before ultimately failing. The voter registration-related bill that probably generated the most headlines this year was in Tennessee where the governor has now signed a bill into law that will criminalize elements of the third-party voter registration process. The Utah Legislature has designated February 14 at Women’s Voter Registration Day.  Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam vetoed a bill that would have required people assisting others to sign up to vote to provide their own information on the paper registration forms.

Vote At Home

Hawaii will move to a vote by mail system in 2020.

Paid postage, all vote-by-mail elections, uniform bar code usage and signature cures were just some of the vote at home legislation that was considered this year. The California Assembly has approved a bill that will cover the cost of return postage for all mail ballots. District of Columbia Councilmember Brianne Nadeau (D-Ward One) has introduced a bill that will send a mail ballot to every voter in DC and, at press time, would keep Election Day precinct-based polling places. Following issues with signatures in the 2018 election, the Florida Legislature has approved a bill that will allow vote at home voters to cure their signatures if a problem is discovered at the supervisor of elections office. Beginning in 2020, Hawaii will become a vote-by-mail state. In Iowa, all counties are required to pay for and use the same barcode system so mail ballots are treated equally statewide. Kansas Gov. Laura Kelly has signed a bill that requires election officials to notify voters before their mail-in ballots are thrown out because of signature problems. Lawmakers in Pennsylvania are currently considering a bill that would allow voters in the commonwealth to cast their ballot by mail. Lawmakers in Oregon are considering postage-paid vote at home ballots. Following in the footsteps of King County, the Washington Legislature has approved a bill that will provide postage-paid return envelopes to voters. In Wyoming, a bill that was supported by the county clerks and would have allowed counties to choose to vote-by-mail failed.

Ranked Choice Voting

The MD Assembly denied Montgomery County’s push for ranked choice.

Following Maine’s successful deployment of ranked choice voting in 2018, a number of state Legislatures considered bills that would mirror Maine’s, but none of those bills really gained much traction. The states include Hawaii,  New Hampshire, New Jersey, Vermont, Virginia and Wyoming. Although Maine successfully used ranked choice in 2018, efforts to expand the voting system to more elections did not have enough support to move forward. In Maryland, one bill that would allowed the city of Baltimore to use ranked choice voting was pulled and another bill that would have allowed Montgomery County to use the system failed in the General Assembly. It should be noted that while RCV didn’t have a successful year at the state level, a number of local jurisdictions considered moving to a ranked system.

 

 

Ex-Felon Voting Rights

The Iowa Legislature failed to enfranchise ex-felons this year.

It was a big year for voting rights for those formerly incarcerated and even for those awaiting trial. Arkansas will now allow restore the voting rights to formerly incarcerated children after they finish their sentence and parole.  In the District of Columbia, where the city council remains in session, Robert White (I-At-Large) has introduced a bill that would allow District residents serving time in federal prisons to cast a ballot. Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis has signed a bill into law that would require ex-felons to pay all fines and fees before their rights may be restored.  In Illinois, SB2090, which is awaiting the governor’s signature, would allow anyone who is being held, but not yet convicted, to cast a ballot. It would also allow a county with a population of more than 3 million to set up a temporary polling place in a county jail. Despite support from the governor and overwhelming support from the public, a bill in Iowa that would have lifted the permanent ban on voting rights for ex-felons failed. Lawmakers in Kentucky are still considering a bill that would lift the permanent ban on voting rights for ex-felons. Efforts in Louisiana to change the voting rights for parolees and probationers went nowhere this year. At least 18 bills were filed in Mississippi that would have reformed felony voting rights restoration and none of them advanced. Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak signed AB431 into law. The new law restores voting rights to ex-felons upon release from prison, not at the end of their sentence.  An amendment that would have automatically restored the voting rights of those released from incarceration in Virginia failed along party lines. In Washington, Gov. Jay Inslee signed legislation into law that streamlines the process and notification requirements to felons of their voting rights and the restoration of those rights.

Voter ID

The NC Legislature made it easier for students to vote this year.

There was a time when the voter ID subhead was jam-packed with news, but not really this year. In Louisiana, a bill has been approved that will allow military IDs to serve as a form of ID to vote. In Maine, a move to require photo ID to vote never made it out of committee. North Carolina’s General Assembly approved legislation that would make it easier for student IDs also serve as voter IDs. The Pennsylvania Legislature, which remains in session, is considering a bill that require an ID vote, although it is not a strict photo ID bill. A bill that would have allowed Virginia residents to use out-of-state college IDs in order to vote failed again.

 

Election Security Updates

The National Governors Association announced last week the six states that will participate in the organization’s latest cybersecurity policy academy.

Officials from Arizona, Hawaii, Idaho, Minnesota, Nevada and Virginia will spend the next six months studying election security to come up with plans and practices to protect the integrity of their voting systems ahead of the 2020 presidential election.

The 2019 academy will focus more closely on issues related to election security, from building protections around voter registration databases to developing better communications between agencies. Participants will include governors’ office staffers, election directors and statewide cabinet agencies, the NGA said.

After being accused of being a one-man roadblock to election security legislation, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Kentucky) said this week that the Senate will have an election security briefing.

“We intend to have a briefing on election security,” McConnell told reporters during a weekly press conference according to The Hill, all the while not responding to questions about whether the upper chamber will take up any election security legislation.

Reps. Jim Himes, D-Connecticut, and John Ratcliffe, R-Texas introduced new legislation that would establish election interference as a Federal crime. The bipartisan bill, dubbed the Defending the Integrity of Voting Systems Act, would make it a Federal crime to hack a voting system used in a Federal election.

Sens. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minnesota) and Ron Wyden (D-Oregon) have written a letter to FBI Director Christopher Wray demanding answers from the agency on its response to Russia’s attempts to have VR Systems during the 2016 presidential election. According to The Hill, the senators questioned the FBI on whether it had investigated those machines for attempted hacking, and also how the FBI is ensuring that local and state election officials “feel comfortable reporting potential cybersecurity incidents” to authorities. The senators have given Wray until July 12 to respond.

2019 Election Updates

Maine: A lack of power didn’t stop Eliot Town Clerk Wendy Rawski from tabulating ballots following this week’s election. Using emergency lights from the fire department and a few camping lantern, Rawski was able to tabulate the ballots after they were cast on Tuesday.

New Jersey: The Union County board of elections discovered three uncounted provisional ballots while organizing polling place supply bags. Two of the ballots should have been counted and one was from a voter who was not registered. The ballots were added to the tally which did not alter the results.

Pennsylvania: It didn’t make national headlines, but as we point out, there are tied elections every voting cycle and this year has been no different. There were four tied races in Mercer County which were all decided this week by drawing numbered ping pong balls from a bag. Whoever chose the #1 ping pong ball was the winner. “It’s kind of weird, but you have to determine it somehow so I guess it’s the way it is,” candidate Mark Skidmore told WYTV.

Virginia: Voters headed the polls in the commonwealth this week and while the biggest story was low voter turnout, there were a handful of isolated issues. In Roanoke, voters had to cast provisional ballots for about two hours when issues with laptop computers prevent poll workers from checking in voters. The problem was discovered just before 6 a.m. when the polls opened and a fix was deployed to all precincts by 9:30 a.m. Redistricting approved by a panel of federal judges earlier this year caused some issues for voters in Yorktown who showed up at the wrong polling places or simply couldn’t figure out where to vote after reviewing new maps. “It’s not a happy election,” Judy Ruston, chief election officer for one polling place in Hampton City told the Virginia Pilot. Ruston said many would-be voters left confused and frustrated. Chesterfield County, which split five precincts experienced issues as well.

Election News This Week

In November 2018, the Camp Fire destroyed several communities in Butte County, California including the town of Paradise. According to the Enterprise Record, the fire was the deadliest and most destructive wildfire in California history with 85 lives lost, 19,000 structures destroyed and 14,000 families displaced. Since the fire, Butte County Clerk-Recorder, Registrar of Voters Candace Grubb and her staff have worked tirelessly to keep track of residents not only for voter registration purposes, but also vital records. Now with 19,000 displaced voters, Grubb is seeking to opt into the California Voter’s Choice Act which will allow the county to move to vote centers and mail ballots in time for the March 2020 primary. The county will have 13 vote centers and every voter will receive a mail ballot with a return-postage paid envelope.

Lessons learned. A lot of counties are going to have old voting equipment to get rid of in the coming months so consider this a cautionary tale. Licking County, Ohio offered its old AccuVote-TSx machines on GovDeals.com and the Columbus Dispatch bought a lot of them and gave them to area high schools to see what their engineering students could do with them. According the paper, while the actual elections software was removed before the sale, the units were otherwise functional. Students were easily able to access administrator functions without access cards and they had access to an internal activity log. That being said, as engineering teacher Greg King pointed out, “To tamper with a statewide election, it would take a lot of resources and a pretty sophisticated organization or somebody on the inside.” Following inquiries from The Dispatch, Secretary of State Frank LaRose’s office issued an advisory to county election officials reminding them of disposal requirements. “Under no circumstances should a voting machine be sold to someone who’s not an authorized user,” said LaRose.

Mythbusters for Elections? Republican Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich is hiring four staff members to investigate voter fraud in The Copper State. “Consider us the `MythBusters’ of election fraud claims and rumors,” Ryan Anderson, a spokesman for Brnovich told KTAR. “If there is fraud, let’s investigate it, let’s prosecute it and work to eradicate it,” Anderson said. “If there’s not fraud, then let’s give the public the confidence they deserve in their elections.” While voter advocacy groups thing the money — $530,00 — would be better spent elsewhere, Democratic election officials, including Secretary of State Katie Hobbs see it as a chance to boost confidence in elections. “If this unit will help maintain the integrity of Arizona’s elections and election systems, then I am all for it,” Maricopa County Recorder Adrian Fontes said in a statement.

Mybusters for Elections, Part II. This week, Paco County, Florida Supervisor of Elections Brian Corely sent a letter voters — which he also shared on social media — urging his voters to be aware of possible cybersecurity threats ahead of next year’s election and how misinformation can easily spread on social media. He urged voters to be vigilant to misinformation and to think twice and even contact his office before sharing something questionable on social media. “There were an untold number of Americans who unknowingly helped perpetuate some of the half-truths and outright lies by retweeting something or sharing something they saw on social media. We just want to have the policy if you see something, say something,” Corely said.

Who dunnit? According to Wicked Local, on May 13, Maynard on May 13, Town Clerk Michelle Sokolowski discovered that a basket by the clerk’s window, where she routinely places paperwork was missing. The paperwork included voter registration cards that had been submitted to the town clerk’s office to be logged into their computer database and the paperwork filed. The police were called and video reviewed and the police have concluded that the missing paperwork was the result of a clerical or custodian error and not a criminal act.

Congratulations to Brevard County, Florida Supervisor of Elections Lori Scott and her team for raising more than $3,000 for Project HUNGER. The money will go toward the Feed & Read summer program for children. “As a mother, I am very passionate about helping children in need,” Scott told the Viera Voice. “We are honored this money will make a difference in the lives of children in our community.”

Personnel News: Eneida Tavares is the new interim head of the Boston Elections Department. She replaces Dion Irish who is moving to the city’s inspectional services department. Former Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams has been named a “Leader of Democracy” by the League of Women Voters of Colorado. Diane Olmer is resigning as the Platte County, Nebraska election commissioner after 23 years on the job. Former Daviess County Clerk David “Oz” Osborne has resigned from the Kentucky board of elections after only one meeting. Bill Luther has been appointed to the Arkansas state election commission.

In Memoriam: Raniero “Renny” Travisano who served one term as Middlesex County, New Jersey clerk has died. He was 82.

Legislative Updates

Maine: By a 19-14 party-line vote, the Senate has a approved a bill that would make Maine the 18th state to institute automatic voter registration. The bill, which is backed by Secretary of state Matt Dunlap would automatically register residents doing business with the Bureau of Motor Vehicles.

Also in Maine, the House has vote against a bill (85-61) that would have allowed municipalities to prohibit guns from polling places. The bill would have allowed towns, counties and school boards to adopt their own policies with regard to banning “the carrying of dangerous weapons” at polling places. The Senate also rejected the bill.

New Hampshire: The Senate has approved HB 106 which would essentially repeal HB1264 that was approved last year. The new bill eliminates the requirement that eligible voters register their cars and obtain a New Hampshire’s driver’s license in order to register to vote.

New York: Under legislation currently being considered, the presidential preference primary would be held on April 28.

Oregon: The House has approved Senate Bill 670 that would prevent elections officials from putting their name on voters’ pamphlets, ballot return envelopes or any other printed materials included with the ballot during the elections in which they are a candidate. The bill goes back to the Senate for the approval of an amendment.

The Oregon Voting Rights Act (House Bill 3310) was approved by the Senate 28-0. The bill puts Oregon in line with the Voting Rights Act of 1965 by ensuring there is a local and community-driven process to ensure protected classes have equal opportunity to elect candidates of their choice.

Legal Updates

California: The ACLU is suing the Fresno County clerk for removing a Unitarian church as a polling place in response to a complaint about their Black Lives Matter banner. The lawsuit says county clerk Brandi Orth asked church leadership to remove the banner and when they refused, she moved the polling place to a different church.

Michigan: Genesee County Circuit Judge Joseph J. Farah has signed a temporary restraining order preventing the city clerk’s office from printing the August primary ballots until Farah can determine if the candidates filed proper paperwork.

New Hampshire: Todd Krysiak, 36 of Alton has been charged with voting twice in the 2016 election. According to state prosecutors Krysiak voted in his hometown as well as in Leominster, Massachusetts.

According to the Valley News, Dee Milliken is under investigation by the state’s attorney general for voter fraud after she helped her son, who has cerebral palsy and a seizure condition, cast his ballot in 2018. “I’m still in shock. All weekend, that’s what I’ve been thinking about,” Milliken told the paper. “Do you have to have a certain IQ to vote? What about if you have a stroke or Alzheimer’s?”

New Mexico: Eight district attorneys from across New Mexico are asking the New Mexico Supreme Court to strike down a provision of House Bill 407 which calls for aligning elections for district attorneys to the gubernatorial election cycle. A writ of mandamus was filed June 8 against Secretary of State Maggie Toulouse-Oliver. “We appreciate the Secretary of State’s Office working with us to try to find a solution to the problem created by HB 407 outside of litigation,” DA John Sugg told the Alamogodo Daily News. “After reviewing the relevant case law, we have concluded that a petition for writ of mandamus is the appropriate legal mechanism to address the unconstitutional provision of HB 407.”

North Carolina: Terrell Graham, 31, of Goldsboro, and David Williams, 55, also of Goldsboro, have been charged with corruptly taking the oath prescribed to voters. Keymonti Winn-Hocutt, 19, of New Bern is charged with corruptly taking the oath prescribed to voters and double voting.

Virginia: Cameron Sasnett, former head of Fairfax County’s elections division who was fired in 2018 is suing the county’s electoral board for $750,000. According to WTOP, the lawsuit alleges that the electoral board intentionally violated Virginia law by wrongfully firing Sasnett over disagreements about state election law and elections policies. Additionally, Sasnett,drug distribution charges filed against Cameron Sasnett last year were dropped by prosecutors last week, apparently due to his cooperation with a broader investigation.

Tech Thursday

Tech Companies: Voatz, a mobile-focused voting and citizen engagement platform,  has raised $7 million in Series A funding led by Medici Ventures and Techstars with participation from Urban Innovation Fund and Oakhouse Partners. The company plans to leverage the funds to enhance the accessibility and usability of its technology, and to grow its security footprint as it launches new pilot programs with states, cities and select international jurisdictions.

Vendors: According to TechCrunch, ES&S has said that it will no longer sell paperless voting machines. ES&S chief executive Tom Burt confirmed the news in an op-ed in Roll Call where he also called on Congress to approve legislation mandating a stronger election machine testing program.

Illinois: The State Board of Elections has launched a redesigned website that optimizes site access for cellphones and tablets.

New York: The New York State Board of Elections has approved three vendors to provide e-poll books to counties to help implement early voting at vote centers. The companies are KNOWiNK, Robis, and Tenex.

South Carolina: The state Election Commission announced this week a $51 million deal with ES&S provide the state with voting machines that will include a paper ballot. The deal includes more than 13,000 new voting machines to be used statewide. “There can be no question as to the accuracy of the election,” John Wells, chairman of the state Election Commission said according The Post and Courier. However not everyone was happy with the choice including the League of Women Voters. “We think it was a mistake,” Christe McCoy-Lawrence, co-president of the SCLWV told the paper. “Putting a computer between the voter and his ballot is not necessary.”

Opinions This Week

National Opinions: Election security, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII | Paper ballots | Voter suppression, II | Voter access | Vote at home

Alabama: Turnout

Florida: Bilingual election materials | Election security

Maine: Ranked choice voting

New Hampshire: Turnout | Election legislation, II

New York: Automatic voter registration | Ranked choice voting, II

Pennsylvania: Election reform

Virginia: Election security

Texas: Suffrage | Secretary of state, II | List maintenance, II, III

Washington: Election costs

Upcoming Events

Common Data Formats for Election Systems Webinar — We’ve been talking about common data formats for years, but what are they really? We will discuss the history of their development, benefits and potential use cases. We’ll also provide resources for implementation and how to get started. When: June 21, 12:30 EDT. Where: Online

U.S. Election Assistance Election Data Summit — The U.S. Election Assistance Commission invites you to attend the 2019 Election Data Summit. The event coincides with the release of the 2018 Election Administration and Voting Survey (EAVS) and will feature expert speakers examining how to use data to help America vote. The day’s keynote speakers and panel discussions will include a look at data within the newly released biennial EAVS survey, as well as broader panel conversations covering issues such as how data can be used to address election security, improve voter registration, modernize election management systems, and enact best practices for serving voters covered under the Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting (UOCAVA) Act. Attendees are strongly encouraged to register in advance and arrive on time in order to guarantee entry. The EAC will accommodate as many registrants as possible, but due to strict room occupancy limits, preregistration may not necessarily guarantee entry if the room is at capacity. This event will also be livestreamed at www.eac.gov. When: June 27, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Where: Russel Senate Office Building; Room 301

National Association of Secretaries Of State — The National Association of Secretaries of State will hold their annual summer conference in late June, early July in New Mexico. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registrations. When: June 30-July 3. Where: Santa Fe, New Mexico.

International Association of Government Officials — “Educate-Elevate-Energize-Engage” is the theme of this year’s annual conference. The conference will include numerous education sessions and workshops as well as a visit to the NASA Houston Space Center. Where: Houston. When: July 11-17.

National Association of Counties — NACo’s 2019 Annual Conference will be held in Clark County (Las Vegas). Although the schedule and keynote speakers are still being hammered out there will be two symposiums on disaster management including an interactive roundtable. When: July 12-15. Where: Las Vegas.

National Association of State Election Directors — The NASED Summer Conference will be held in Austin, Texas, July 14-16, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Conference of State Legislatures: NCSL’s Legislative Summit will feature numerous elections-related sessions include several about redistricting, voter registration, infrastructure and the Census. And if that wasn’t enough, Dolly Parton will be one of the featured keynote speakers.  When: August 5-8. Where: Nashville.

Election Center 35th Annual National Conference: This year’s Conference attendees will be inspired and energized as we head into the final stretch of the 2019 Election year. We will share substantive elections issues including crucial critical infrastructure information, new election initiatives and tons of practical and meaningful election administration tools and resources including the newest innovations and ideas to help election officials as the 2020 presidential year quickly approaches. When: Aug. 17-24. Where: Orlando.

Job Postings This Week

electionlineWeekly publishes election administration job postings each week as a free service to our readers. To have your job listed in the newsletter, please send a copy of the job description, including a web link to mmoretti@electionline.org.  Job postings must be received by 5pm on Wednesday in order to appear in the Thursday newsletter. Listings will run for three weeks or till the deadline listed in the posting.

Bilingual Resources and Marketing Specialist, Gwinnett County, Georgia —  Gwinnett County Voter Registration and Elections is responsible for planning and organizing all election voter-related activities and assist Gwinnett’s cities and special districts with election preparations. The division is comprised of staff that are proud to be part of a team that works together to assure that every vote counts. This position will be responsible for marketing and outreach for our Elections Division. The incumbent will create marketing material, work with community partners/organizations and conduct outreach related to Gwinnett County’s Election Division and the Bilingual Election Law (Sec. 203 of the Voting Rights Act). The incumbent must be proficient in oral, written and reading comprehension of the Spanish language. The primary responsibility for this position will be to educate and inform various community organizations, registered and prospective voters about election processes in both English and Spanish. The incumbent will also be required to set up and take down tables, display boards and various marketing materials for public events. Salary: $42,1620 $48,486. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Communications Coordinator/Assistant, Boulder County, Colorado— assist Communications Specialist with various duties for the Clerk & Recorder office. The bulk of this time will focus on the work of the Elections Division; however, individual will assist in some tasks and communication campaigns that cover Motor Vehicle and Recording divisions. Description of Work: This is an hourly, non-benefited position funded now through early December 2020. Ideal candidate can work between 18-30 / hours week. Hours/days are flexible to work around school or other existing work schedule. Occasional weekend or evening support may be needed.The ideal candidate will have strong communications skills, familiarity with WordPress or similar website editing platforms, have a positive attitude, be able to take initiative, and be relatively outgoing. Great position for anyone interested in elections who is a junior, senior, recent graduate or graduate student in communications, marketing, journalism, political science, or related field. This is an hourly. non-benefited position and is expected to end in December 2020. Work hours are flexible and will average 18 to 30 per week. The position works out of Boulder. Salary: $18-$20/hour. Deadline: June 24. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Customer Support Consultant, Hart InterCivic— The Customer Support Consultant is responsible for providing application and hardware support to Hart InterCivic customers via telephone and email for all Hart InterCivic products.  The Support Consultant is also responsible for monitoring all requests to ensure efficient, effective resolution. The successful CSC will work directly with customers and other staff members. The position is responsible for responding to customer contacts, dealing with issues in a professional manner, providing technical direction to customers in a manner they can understand and being a customer advocate.  The CSC must have outstanding written and verbal communication skills. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Deputy Director, Center for Election Innovation & Research— the Deputy Director will report to the Executive Director and have a broad range of responsibilities designed to support CEIR’s mission. In this position, the Deputy Director will play an integral role in the development and execution of CEIR’s programming, strategic communications, and continued growth as an organization. This is an excellent opportunity for an experienced and highly motivated individual who wants to make a substantial, positive, nonpartisan impact on elections and American democracy. The Deputy Director’s primary workplace will be CEIR’s Washington, DC office. The Deputy Director also must be available for business travel as needed. CEIR believes that working alongside and understanding the diverse mix of people who are affected by elections and American democracy is key to achieving our mission. That’s why we’re proud to be an equal opportunity employer committed to creating a diverse, non-discriminatory work environment. We recruit, employ, train, compensate, and promote regardless of race, religion, color, national origin, sex, disability, age, veteran status, and other protected status as required by applicable law. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Election Clerk 2, Pierce County, Washington – This position primarily involves data entry and processing of voter registration transactions, with moderate to heavy customer service interactions (phone and in-person) for 4-5 weeks prior to an election. Maintain voter registration/elections database. Key and update voter registration information from paper forms, Department of Licensing and on-line submittals. Register new voters, updates voter addresses and researches voter registration records. Provide customer service information at the front counter and over the telephone. Understand content, intent, and applicability of the Revised Code of Washington (RCW) and the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) as they apply to election activities. Coordinate, perform, and complete multiple duties and assignments concurrently and in a timely manner. Process records using the state voter registration database. Issue ballots to voters. Respond to customers using the PC Elections email account. Assist on special projects. Research voters’ records to ensure proper counting of ballots. Assist Election Specialists as assigned. Provide information for candidates regarding candidate filing. Perform essential voter registration functions of an Election Clerk 1. Communicate effectively verbally and in writing to audiences of various social, cultural, ethnic, educational and economic backgrounds Other duties as assigned. Salary: $24.41 – $30.55 Hourly. Deadline: June 16. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Election Coordinator, Solano County, California— The Elections Coordinator is a supervisor who is charged with successfully overseeing a specific election function – this could be either Voter Registration, Vote by Mail, Candidate Services, or Poll Places/Poll Workers.  Each of the four Coordinators within our office are rotated every four years for cross-training and expanding job knowledge. Additional duties involve participating in developing, updating and implementing office procedures to comply with Federal and State laws; training staff and potentially poll workers; working with community stakeholders in achieving our mission; or coordinating the work of contractors that assist with our operation.  The Ideal candidates will have experience in conducting elections and supervising employees. Skills in Microsoft Office applications including Access and Excel; Geographic information systems such as ArcMap; or experience with web design and adobe software packages are beneficial. Salary: $33.41 – $40.61 hourly. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Lead Specialist, Douglas County, Colorado— The Elections Lead Specialist assists in the supervision and coordination of elections operations, staff, and election judges including voter services, mail ballot processing and the conduct of elections. The objective of this position is to perform a variety of functions and diverse support roles on a routine basis. Mail Ballot Processing responsibilities are prioritized over other duties during election cycles, which may increase or decrease dramatically depending on the Elections cycle. In the absence of the Operations Manager, assumes responsibility for front-line functions associated with elections operations. This is a highly visible position requiring exceptional leadership, organizational, and communication skills. Salary: $3,550-$4,438 monthly. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Specialist, Anoka County, Minnesota — Transparent and accurate elections that allow for the genuine expression of the will of the voters are the bedrock of our democracy. The Anoka County Office of Elections and Voter Registration works closely with local jurisdictions to administer elections with integrity, ensuring all eligible voters can register to vote and cast their ballot through an efficient and credible process. The Elections Specialist who joins the Anoka County Elections team will play a critical role supporting the planning, preparation and execution of core election functions, including voter registration, absentee voting and election day activities. The ideal candidate will be familiar with and comfortable using technology. This team player will demonstrate flexibility and an ability to adjust priorities on short notice. The Elections Specialist will have a strong sense of quality customer service and must engage voters, candidates and other stakeholders in a nonpartisan and respectful manner. This full-time, benefit-eligible position is located at the Anoka County Government Center. Salary: $19.10 – $19.67 Hourly. Deadline: June 24. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Election Specialist I, Douglas County, Colorado — This position is focused on routine customer service and general office/clerical support including data entry, communications, and processing mail. This is a support role capable of performing a variety of tasks, with problem solving abilities, managing multiple competing responsibilities and prioritizing to maintain a continuous flow of election office operations. This is a visible and crucial position requiring exceptional computer, customer service, and communication skills. This is a benefited part-time position and benefits are pro-rated to 30 hours per week. This is an open until filled posting, review of applications and interviews will begin immediately and continue until suitable candidates are selected. Salary: $16.40-$20.50/hourly. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Election Specialist II, Douglas County, Colorado— The Election Specialist II is responsible for routine support services related to temporary employees, training, Voter Service and Polling Centers, mail ballot processing, voter registration, and customer service. This position contributes to the department’s achievement of delivering efficient, transparent, fair and accurate elections as well as performs other projects as assigned. This position requires technical work in a lead role capable of performing a variety of complex tasks, with solving problem abilities, managing multiple competing tasks and prioritizing to maintain a continuous flow of operations and temporary support. This is a visible and crucial position requiring previous elections experience, and exceptional computer, customer service, and communication skills. Please note this position is posted as open until filled, review of applications will begin immediately and continue until a suitable candidate is selected. Salary: $3,214 – $4,017 Monthly. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Executive Director, State Democracy Project— The inaugural Executive Director will provide the strategic and forward-thinking leadership needed to take our vision and make it a reality. With an eye to deepening relationships and taking bold action, the ED will ensure that the SDP works in genuine ongoing partnership with the dozens of national and state organizations that actively participate in the project. The ED will also organize and utilize the talent, resources, and relationships critical for near-term wins on structural democracy reforms.This position will report to the Board of Directors, which is comprised of coalition partner representatives. It will be the ED’s responsibility to manage all that comes with establishing a startup based on a coalitional model. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

IT Support Specialist, Collier County, Florida— The IT Support Specialist works closely with IT staff to provide technical support and assistance to all staff located within the Supervisor of Elections office. This person will work with a wide variety of elections industry specific technologies to include hardware, software, programming, printers, and applications. In addition, this person will be providing support and assistance for non-election industry networking technology to include workstations, servers, printers, etc. The primary areas of responsibility for the IT Department include Network and associated Infrastructure, Hardware and Software Support, Database Administration, Daily Backup and Recovery, Disaster Recovery, Voting Equipment and Related Technologies to include Ballot Design and Tabulation, a variety of Programs, and Geographic Information Systems. The IT Support Specialist’s duties include hardware support including but not limited to, file servers (virtual and physical), storage (SAN and NAS), workstations (desktops and laptops), switches, printers, and scanners (image and barcode). Support also includes all election related equipment. Software support includes software applications for both election and non-election related software products. Applications include but are not limited to a variety of Microsoft applications (Windows 7 & 10, SQL, Access, Excel, Outlook, Power Point, Projects, Visio, Word), Adobe products (Acrobat, Reader) Photo Shop, as well as industry specific voter registration software. Other responsibilities include a variety of administrative tasks such as reports and logs. Accuracy and attention to detail is crucial. Salary: $45,000 – $60,000 annually. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Program Officer: Elections and Political Processes — The National Democratic Institute for International Affairs (NDI) seeks a Program Officer to join its Election and Political Processes Team and work with NDI’s regional teams, country teams, local partners, and international partners to advance electoral integrity, promote accountability and encourage citizen engagement in electoral processes. The Program Officer will work with other members of the Election and Political Processes Team to support: country-level programs, which involve citizen election monitoring (including parallel vote tabulations (PVTs)); international election observation efforts; international workshops, academies and conferences; and global initiatives, including, for example, the Open Election Data Initiative (OEDI). This position is based in Washington, DC and will require periodic travel. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Project Manager, Hart InterCivic— Project Managers at Hart InterCivic are highly motivated “self-starters” who are enthusiastic about providing exceptional customer service. Working with other members of the Professional Services and Operations teams, the Project Manager directs activity, solves problems, and develops lasting and strong relationships with our customers. Hart InterCivic’s unique and industry known culture of innovation, transparency, and customer-centric focus creates an environment where team members will continually grow and be challenged to develop their careers. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Policy & Data Research Analyst, New York City Campaign Finance Board— The New York City Campaign Finance Board seeks a Policy & Data Research Analyst to perform original research to help inform the agency’s policy and program choices on campaign finance and voting. This position will report to the Deputy Director of Public Affairs. Responsibilities:  Under the direction of the Deputy Director of Public Affairs, design and perform analysis of campaign finance records, elections and voter participation data; Research policy and legislative issues related to campaign finance, voter participation, and election administration in New York City and New York State; Assist in preparing reports and policy briefs on campaign finance and election performance; and work with Public Affairs staff to create policy recommendations to improve the public matching funds program, voter participation, and election administration. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Product Manager, Hart InterCivic — as Product Manager, you will join a team that is charged with product planning, design, and execution throughout the lifecycle of Hart’s products, in support of the company’s overall strategy and goals. This includes: gathering, validating, and prioritizing internal and external customer needs; documenting and communicating product and technical requirements; gathering market and competitive intelligence; supporting the certification, sales, and marketing teams. The Product Manager must possess a unique blend of business and technical savvy – with experience in elections technology or other government-oriented products preferred.  To succeed in this role, the ideal candidate must spend time in the market to understand its unique attributes; demonstrate competence with specialized hardware and software; and find innovative solutions for the broader market. The Product Manager plays a key role in helping others to understand the product positioning, key benefits, and target customer, as well as providing advanced subject matter expertise in using the company’s products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Red Team Independent Contractor, Galois— Galois seeks an experienced Red Team Lead with red teaming and/or CTF experience of purported secure systems that include custom hardware to play a pivotal role in fulfilling our mission to make trustworthy critical systems. The role will be responsible for the strategic and tactical direction of a small team dedicated to red team activities. The team is responsible for developing threat simulation services, threat research, structured attack development, vulnerability research and exploit development/testing, scripting and controlled exploitation of hardware and software vulnerabilities. The scope of the position also requires understanding a complex cyber-physical system architecture to develop a precise threat model, red teaming framing, and win conditions for both the DEF CON exercises. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Research Scientist, MIT Election Data and Science Lab— MEDSL seeks a research scientist  to oversee the data science workflow of the lab’s election-related data collection, processing, and dissemination efforts.  MEDSL aims to improve the democratic experience for all U.S. voters by applying scientific principles to how elections are studied and administered. Responsibilities include assisting the director with designing and implementing research projects; gathering and analyzing data, designing research protocols, and documenting results; managing data science and quality control for the 2018 release of the Elections Performance Index (EPI); acquiring data from government sources and designing protocols to update indicators not provided by government sources; assisting with redistricting data collection/dissemination efforts; working with web designers to update EPI website and creating original content for MEDSL website; onboarding and monitoring the work of students/research support associates; tracking scholarship in the field of election science; and performing other data science/administrative/reporting duties as assigned. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Software Sales Specialist, VOTEC— VOTEC’s Sales Specialist is responsible for creating news sales with prospects and existing clients in targeted areas in the US. We are looking for an election professional comfortable using insight and consultative selling techniques to create interest that offers unique solutions on their operations, which link back to VOTEC’s solutions. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Technical Bid Specialist, Scytl — The Technical Bid Specialist is an essential member of the sales team, supporting business development initiatives as well as providing support to the Marketing department. Based in our Tampa Florida, offices, the Technical Bid Specialist is in charge of managing the coordination, completion and handover of tender proposals for our clients and prospects. This is a key position with a great deal of involvement in the sales process and a decisive influence in the achievement of each deal. To be able to perform this task, the Technical Bid Specialist needs to possess a solid technical background, outstanding writing capabilities and proven experience in pre-sales or consulting endeavors, always facing the client and having to put together complex IT proposals or projects. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

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In Focus This Week

June 6, 2019

June 6, 2019

In Focus This Week

What Suffrage means to me
The nation’s top female elections officials talk about Suffrage

By M. Mindy Moretti
electionline.org

One hundred years ago this week, the Senate approved the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution that would ultimately give women the right to vote.

After the June 4, 1919 passage (the House approved it two weeks prior) it took 16 months to get three-fourths of the states to ratify the Amendment.

Wisconsin is credited with being first and it was Tennessee that pushed the needle over the line for ratification on August 26, 1920.

Interestingly, several states — Alabama, Delaware, Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, South Carolina and Virginia — rejected the 19th Amendment initially, but eventually ratified the Amendment after it was law with Mississippi being last in 1984.

During the next 16 months we’ll be highlighting the Suffrage movement in different ways, including last week’s look at three exhibits celebrating the centennial.

This week, we asked the highest ranking female election official in each state what Suffrage means to them. The responses come from large and small states, from both coasts and the Heartland. We heard from Democrats, Republicans and some whose party affiliation we have don’t even know! It’s a fascinating read and we really hope that you will enjoy it as much as we did.

Thank you to everyone who responded.

Alaska
Gail Fenumiai, director, Division of Elections
I cannot imagine not having the right to vote.  It is the core of our nation’s democracy. I am thankful for the courageous and wonderful women who fought hard for this precious right.  As an election official, it is hard for me to comprehend barring individuals from voting. It is our job to ensure that we never forget their struggles and continue to strive to remove barriers to voting and provide equal access for all.

 

Arizona
Katie Hobbs, secretary of state
In August of 2018, during the suffrage celebrations, I was a candidate for Secretary of State. The moment I realized that I would (hopefully) be in the office for the 100th anniversary was profound. The magnitude of what this anniversary means, how far we have come, and the opportunity to be in a position to help create a meaningful celebration gave me chills. Arizona has been a state where women lead, and I am grateful to all the women who paved the way for me. I also feel an incredible sense of responsibility to continue to be vigilant and protect access to our elections for everyone who is eligible. My daughter will be able to vote for the first time in 2020, during the 19th Amendment Centennial. She represents the next generation of voters who will share their stories to ensure future generations never take this right for granted.

Arkansas
Leslie Bellamy, director
I think especially for me as an election official the fight for the passage of our 19th Amendment has not only provided me a right to voice my opinion through casting my ballot, but a career path I am passionate about.  I started in elections over 20 years ago as a Voter Registration clerk, and will end my state career as Director of Elections for the state of Arkansas. The suffrage movement has provided a path where I can participate in legislative changes to carry on the movement of not being denied the right to a voice.  I continue to utilize my experience to work in legislative sessions and training sessions to protect the democratic process with the evolving industry.

California
Jana Lean, chief of elections
The hundred year anniversary of women gaining the right to vote reminds me that not so long ago in history, women were suppressed and marginalized in our society. We have made huge strides, but we are again at a crossroads where the rights of women are being threatened.

I believe it is not just our civic duty to let our voices be heard through the ballot box, but it is a moral imperative to protect the rights of all of the women who will follow us. It is our time to continue the impressive work of the Suffragettes that paved the way for us today.

Respectful discourse, the peaceful transition of power, and fair representation is the foundation our county was built on. I think we should honor the anniversary of women gaining the right to vote by continuing the fight for free and fair elections for everyone!

Colorado
Jena Griswold, secretary of state
The significance of the 19th Amendment’s 100th anniversary is both historic and an important reminder that we must continue to strive for access to our democracy. Because of the suffragists who advocated to expand the right to vote to women, Colorado became the second state to allow women to vote in 1893. On this anniversary of women across our country gaining that right, we must commit to ensuring, as a nation, that every eligible voter can have their voice heard in our elections. Together, we can build a democracy that all Americans can believe in.

Connecticut
Denise Merrill, secretary of state
The movement for women’s suffrage is a testament of the power of direct action to expand democracy. Not just a reminder of the laws that were changed, I plan to use this centennial anniversary as a reminder of what is possible when ordinary people organize in the name of justice. And, although we celebrate the end of the denial of the right to vote on the basis of sex, it’s important to also remember that it was only a first step towards universal suffrage and equality of the sexes, and it left out women of color almost entirely.

We should celebrate the hundredth anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment as more than a single event, and instead celebrate it as the introductory chapter in the long stories of women’s equality and voting rights alike. We will mark the centennial, but we will also use it to remember the work that remains. It is a promise to remain committed to that work until it is complete.

Delaware
Elaine Manlove, election commissioner
While I’ve never seen myself as a “feminist”, voting is not something I take for granted.  I am thankful to the women who went before me and fought for all of us to have this right. There should have never been a fight!  If we are governed by the law, we should be able to vote on those who make those laws.

 

District of Columbia
Alice Miller, executive director
Having worked in elections for most of my career, this 100th anniversary of suffrage resonates with me for a number of professional and personal reasons. As women throughout the District of Columbia occupy an increasing number of elected offices both locally and nationwide, and occupy other high level positions of authority, enfranchising voters of all genders is vitally important for the protection of accurate representation in our city. As the mother of a daughter, I am committed to ensuring that the next generation of voters and candidates in the District of Columbia feels that their electoral process is available and accessible to them regardless of their race, gender, or national origin. On this historically significant anniversary, it is my hope that we continue to make progress so that all District voters feel they can participate in our elections.

Florida
Laurel M. Lee, secretary of state
Next year marks the 100th anniversary of the passage of the 19th amendment, which provided women the right to vote. The suffragist movement was a long and difficult battle, but it was fought with the utter and absolute conviction that women should be full and equal citizens with the right to participate in our democracy.

These women, and the men who supported them, paved the way not just for our future, but also for the future of our children and the many generations to come. Now, nearly 100 years later, women continue to help shape the trajectory of our nation and our world through their leadership.

I’m thankful for those women who led the way 100-plus years ago because without them, women would not have the rights and privileges of citizenship that we enjoy today.

We honor them by continuing to be leaders in our communities, our state and our world and by fully participating in our democracy.

Indiana
Connie Lawson, secretary of state
100 years ago, the 19th Amendment was passed by Congress, and American women won the right to vote. After decades of civic exclusion and political irrelevance, hundreds of thousands of women were finally handed enfranchisement at the ballot box.

It is striking how recently these changes took place. My mother was born only a short while after ratification, and in my younger days I spoke with many relatives and family friends who could recall this seismic change. Furthermore, if we are painfully honest with ourselves, some women were still denied the right to vote until 1965, simply because of their skin color.

So often we accept the twists of history as inevitable fact, but these rights came only after many years of fighting and perseverance. It is often said, correctly, that we stand on the shoulders of giants. I pray we never take our electoral equality for granted.

Iowa
Christy Wilson, deputy secretary of state
It is a huge honor for me to work in elections in a state that has historically been a leader in voting rights and remains that way today. Iowa was the first state to elect a woman to public office, the first state to appoint a female to the bar and one of the first states to allow women to vote. Iowan Carrie Chapman Catt was a national leader in the women’s suffrage movement.

Today, we’re one of the few states that has online voter registration, same day voter registration, early voting and no-fault absentee voting. We strive every day to encourage and help all Iowans to register to vote and participate in elections. Our country has come a long way in the last 100 years and this centennial anniversary is a great reminder that we are a government of the people, by the people and for the people.

Kentucky
Alison Lundergan Grimes, secretary of state
“The right is ours, have it we must, use it we will,” said Elizabeth Cady Stanton.  This echoes in my head every time I enter our Capitol.

As Secretary of State, I’ve worked hard to ensure all eligible citizens have access to our ballot box and vote.  Sadly, the struggle which began 100 years ago to ensure the basic inalienable rights of women, continues today.

Suffrage describes a moment in time where a movement for equality began.  Personally, I’m reminded of my grandmothers. They saw the right to vote be realized.

While women can now get an education, own property, vote, hold office, get a job and practice our faith – equality doesn’t exist.  As long as “firsts” continue – like being the first statewide elected official to have a child in office – the movement is not finished and little girls everywhere rely on our fortitude to stand up and speak out.

Maryland
Linda Lamone, administrator of elections
Every election makes history, but the 1920 election in Maryland was indeed historic. A special session of the Maryland legislature was held on September 20 – 22, 1920. The result was a bill that granted Maryland women the right to register and to vote. I cannot tell you the number of women that cast a vote at the November 9, 1920 General Election, but 1,288,931 Maryland women cast a vote in the 2018 General Election!

Thus, while we celebrate the anniversary of an action by a body of men that changed a law, we also celebrate and recognize the powerful and determined women that sacrificed so much to make this happen. Countless women across the country spent years attending secret meetings, organized, protested and went to jail all to gain the right to vote.

It may be difficult for us to understand the complexity, time and overall effort that it took to made this change around the country, especially without today’s methods of communication and ability to get a message out. No website, no email, no social media.

An interesting side effect of the historical legal change was the impact it had on election administration. It is clear from a review of the 1920 Maryland legislation that the legislators were aware that they also had to address what would be required to implement a change to the voting process. For example, they added extra days for the Registration Boards to sit, added polling places to accommodate more voters, added clerical employees at the boards of elections, added a new requirement to record the sex of the applicants in the registration records, and increased the compensation of poll workers and clerks of registration (by no more than $2.00).

We read so often that voter turnout is not what we would like it to be. It is disheartening to think of the sacrifices and difficulties that it took to gain the right to vote by half of our population and yet so few take advantage of the franchise.

Thank you so much to those pioneering women who made it possible for me to vote and to run the elections for the State of Maryland.

Massachusetts
Michelle Tassinari, director and legal counsel, Elections Division
As we approach the 100th anniversary of woman’s suffrage, I have spent a great deal of time thinking about the current state of women’s rights in our country.  I have great admiration for the suffragists who successfully fought for the rights of women 100 years ago. While we gained the right to vote, there is still more to do to achieve true equality for all.  A century ago, brave, strong women took to the streets during difficult times in our country’s history. The fight for women’s suffrage lasted for decades and finally achieved victory, which was just one of the first steps toward women’s equality. We must never forget those who came before us and who fought for our rights. I am proud to be a woman working in elections and using my position to help make sure all who are eligible can exercise their right to vote.

Michigan
Jocelyn Benson, secretary of state
With courage and perseverance, suffragists fought and organized for the right to vote. These trailblazing women brought America closer to the promises of its founding with the passage of the 19th amendment. But as history teaches us, the fight for equality wasn’t over then and isn’t over today. It took 50 more years to expand the right to vote to African Americans and people of color. Now, 100 years after the suffrage movement and 50 years after the civil rights movement, it’s on all of us to continue in the footsteps of the trailblazers who came before us. Our democracy is at its best when all voices are heard. At a moment when women are still underrepresented in industries from sports to business to politics, we must continue to use our votes and our voices to advocate for a seat at every table where decisions are made.

Missouri
Chrissy Peters, director of elections
The celebration of the 100th anniversary of woman’s right to suffrage is an important time of history that should be reflected on with great admiration. I am thankful for my right to vote and reflect with gratitude the hard battles of those before us. I bring my young daughters with me when I cast my ballot. Personally for me, this is leading by example so that my daughters understand the importance of our right, privilege and opportunity to have our voices heard.

 

Nevada
Barbara Cegavske, secretary of state
Voting is both a privilege and a responsibility that all citizens must take seriously. I am fortunate to have always lived in a time when women have been afforded the opportunity to vote. To mark 100 years of Women’s Suffrage while serving as Nevada’s third female Secretary of State will be a special honor for me and I am extremely proud to join women across the country in celebrating this important milestone in 2020!

 

New Jersey
Tahesha Way, secretary of state
Every right we cherish as Americans is secured with the ballot box. Thanks to the leadership of women like New Jersey’s own Alice Paul, the right to vote was legally extended to women 100 years ago. While African American women like me were still prevented from exercising this right many years after 1920, the 19th Amendment nonetheless made this country fairer, opening doors for women to participate more broadly in public life and service. It is the knowledge of this history which underscores my commitment to an open democracy that ensures and maximizes ballot access for all American citizens.

New Mexico
Maggie Toulouse Oliver, secretary of state
The victory of women’s suffrage is a powerfully inspiring example of civic change that has deeply shaped my personal and public life. It’s incredible to be alive for the 100th anniversary and to be able to reflect on the advances that have been made toward fulfilling America’s democratic promise and opening the franchise to all eligible voters. But part of that reflection is to know the work is not done. The victory of women’s suffrage in America should serve as a reminder that many communities still face barriers to the ballot box and that efforts at voter suppression are not gone, but have simply taken on new forms. I draw inspiration from the pioneers of women’s suffrage in America everyday as I look for ways to expand voting rights and civic participation and I hope the 100th anniversary inspires a new generation to do the same.

Ohio
Amanda Grandjean, director of elections and deputy assistant secretary of state
“There will never be complete equality until women themselves help to make the laws and elect the lawmakers.” As we consider the powerful words of Susan B. Anthony, we are reminded why the right of women and men to vote equally in elections is unassailable. It’s about tried and true representation in our democratic republic. One hundred years, relative to the duration of our nation’s history, is not a long time for women to be a part of our nation’s democratic process. We’ve broken glass ceilings since then, but there are still quite a few more that need shattered. It’s my hope that women across Ohio and the nation will do far more than use this anniversary as a time to celebrate – instead, use it as a call to action. Get engaged. Get involved. Be a part of the process that our sisters fought so bravely for. Our time is now.

Oregon
Bev Clarno, secretary of state
Woman’s suffrage is such an important but relatively unknown part of our history. Here in Oregon, women were given the right to vote in 1912, eight years before the 19th amendment was ratified. In 2020 we will be celebrating the 100 year anniversary of that historic amendment, and I am so honored that I will be serving as Oregon’s Secretary of State during the centennial celebration.

I often think of my mother, who was alive when women didn’t have the vote, and knew firsthand what it meant to finally be able to vote. I think about myself, as an 83 year old woman serving in public office. 100 years ago I would not have had this opportunity, and I am so grateful for all the women, and men, who fought so hard so that I could have this right today.

Pennsylvania
Kathy Boockvar, secretary of state
As we approach the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, guaranteeing women’s constitutional right to vote, 100 years feels like a blink of an eye. What might be most shocking is how long it took to get there – 144 years after this democracy was founded – plus decades thereafter while the struggle continued for so many.

As Pennsylvania’s chief election official, the magnitude of our – my – responsibility to nurture, protect, and defend this right cannot be overstated.

It has been a long, devastating road to suffrage for all. We committed unspeakable atrocities to our own, and overwhelming numbers of lives were indelibly altered, and lost, in pursuit of voting rights. We must honor the sacrifices of all who brought us to this point by ensuring that no eligible voter is disenfranchised.  We must commit every fiber of our being to ensuring we never let such atrocities happen on our soil again.

Rhode Island
Nellie Gorbea, secretary of state
As Rhode Island’s Secretary of State, I’ve seen firsthand that bringing people with different viewpoints and experiences to the table is how we get our best public policies.

The passage of the 19th Amendment was a watershed moment in that regard. Women obviously bring different perspectives than men and since being enfranchised, our voices have contributed to some of the biggest policy changes over the last century.

While there is still much work to be done to make sure all citizens have a voice in government, today I reflect on the things we’re seeing that our mothers and grandmothers could never have imagined. I think about what our daughters will see, and I am hopeful.

I encourage voters to remember that the single act of casting a ballot is fundamental to making government work for all people.

South Carolina
Marci Andino, executive director
The 100th Anniversary of Women’s Suffrage is an important milestone in the history of our country. Over the course of a century, women have not only gained the right to vote, but they register and vote in greater numbers than men, are elected to public offices and run elections in many states and local jurisdictions. We’ve come a long way in a hundred years!

As a young girl, I remember standing in a long line with my mother so she could register to vote. Little did I know at the time, making it easier for people to register to vote would become a passion of mine. I’ve spent most of my professional career working to ensure that all eligible citizens have the opportunity to register to vote and to participate in fair and impartial elections. Those are more than just words to me – I am honored to serve as the chief state election official for the State of South Carolina and I’m very grateful to the women before me.

South Dakota
Kea Warne, deputy secretary of state
In my capacity as the director of South Dakota elections I have the honor of ensuring that elections are run with integrity and that all citizens have the ability to vote if they so choose. It is difficult for me to imagine, but not that long ago women in our country were not given an equal voice. Women’s suffrage was obtained 100 years ago, a blink of an eye in the span of history. The Dakota Territory almost passed women’s right to vote in 1872 and had several near misses after that including attempts from the legendary Susan B. Anthony. All those efforts failed until 1918 when we were finally given the right to vote in state elections, and the 19th Amendment to the constitution was passed in 1919. Now, 100 years later we have had female state legislators, female representatives in Congress, female constitutional officers, a lieutenant governor and now finally, governor. We also have a woman in charge of the State’s elections, a responsibility I take great pride in and I wouldn’t be here if it wasn’t for the efforts of so many, not so very long ago.

U.S. Virgin Islands
Caroline Fawkes, supervisor of elections
Women’s suffrage refers to the right of women to participate in democratic processes through voting on the same basis as men. I agree with the view that women gained the right to vote due to their contributions to the war, since I too have served in the military for over thirty-two years.

Women persevered and endured great hardships to ensure the granting of rights that many today take for granted. In the words of Margaret Mead, “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world.”

As the Supervisor of Elections, it’s great to see now when the polls open women and men stand next to each other and cast a vote that holds the same importance. In addition, the number of women elected in 2018 shows that more women are participating in the political process. This victory was not only for women, but for democracy and the principle of equality upon which our great nation was founded.

Washington
Kim Wyman, secretary of state
I believe the act of voting is the most sacred right we hold as Americans. As I reflect on the suffragists who sacrificed so much to give women the right to vote and worked relentlessly to pass the 19th Amendment, I think about the strong, influential women in my life. Women like my mom, my grandmothers, my aunts, and mentors who taught me the importance of civic engagement. They took time to learn about the candidates and issues before voting. I saw their “I Voted” stickers. They served on election boards. Their actions made me see the importance of my vote. They are the reason why I have not missed voting in an election since turning 18. These women gave me the courage to become an election administrator 25 years ago and now I am honored to have the responsibility of protecting the voting rights of every Washington citizen.

West Virginia
Brittany Westfall, elections director
Being raised by a single mother, it is difficult for me to imagine a time when women were forced to depend on men not only for finances, but also for their voices. On this 100th Anniversary of Women’s Suffrage, I tried to imagine how it felt to stand in line at the polling place, only to be turned away. I tried to imagine the courage it took to rally, lobby, and vote, even when that meant jail time. I am grateful to the women who realized how valuable the right to vote would be for their daughters and granddaughters. Without their courage, I know that I would not have the life I have today or the honor of working with 134 women election administrators. As women in elections, I hope we continue their journey by ensuring no voter is ever again turned away based on sex, religion, or race.

Wisconsin
Meagan Wolfe, administrator
In 1919, Wisconsin was the first state to ratify the 19th amendment granting women an equal right to vote.  In 2019, it was my great honor and privilege to be confirmed as Wisconsin’s first female chief election official. My hope is to continue Wisconsin’s long tradition of fostering a fair and thriving democracy and being a leader in the administration of elections.

Election Security Updates

On May 30 , President Donald J. Trump seemingly called for paper ballots nationwide.

“Going to good ol’ fashioned paper in this modern age is the way to do it,” the president told reporters at the White House.

A House Appropriations subcommittee approved a bill that includes $600 million in funding for the Election Assistance Commission (EAC) meant for states to bolster election security, with the money specifically earmarked for states to buy voting systems with “voter-verified paper ballots.”

In a new report from the Inspector General, the IG says staff shortages are making it difficult for the Department of Homeland Security to coordinate with states on securing the nation’s election infrastructure. “Additional staff could enhance DHS’ ability to provide technical assistance and outreach to state and local election officials during elections,” the report stated.

2020 Candidates on the Issues

Democratic candidate Beto O’Rourke announced his plans this week for improving America’s election system. The plan includes a goal to register more than 50 million people by 2024 and increase vote turnout to 65 percent of eligible voters. In addition, O’Rourke wants to make Election Day a federal holiday, allow automatic and same-day registration nationwide, abolish voter ID requirements and enact legislation that establishes independent redistricting commissions.

2019 Election Updates

New Jersey: Primary day in New Jersey was relatively quiet although it certainly started out with a bang when a car being driven by a poll worker in Totawa crashed into the fire station that was being used as a polling place. Neither the driver nor anyone else at the site was hurt and the polling place opened on time and voting was not interrupted. In Camden County, with ballots still arriving today, vote-by-mail was on pace to significantly eclipse ballots cast in person on election day.

South Dakota: Rapid City and Pennington County voters experienced some issues when attempting to cast a ballot this week. A paving project in Rapid City caused delays for voters trying to access a polling location. Signs were added by construction workers, but it took longer for some voters to access the site. “There were a lot of angry people at 7 a.m.” when the voting opened, poll worker Mary Mertes told the Rapid City Journal. She said people were having to park on and walk up the hill to reach the polling site. Construction crews did not leave the site for the day until 5 p.m. “We wondered if it was poor planning or voting suppression,” voter Clark Jones told the paper. For other voters, it was a problem on the City of Rapid City’s website that caused polling place issues. The city’s list of polling places was incorrect on the website. The mistake was caught by mid-day and fixed.

Election News This Week

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has agreed to conduct an inspection of election equipment used in Durham County, North Carolina in 2016. E-poll books in use on Election Day in Durham County repeatedly told voters that they had already cast a ballot when they had not and the county was forced to take the e-poll books out of service and move to traditional paper rolls. It was revealed in 2017 that the e-poll book vendor—VR Systems—had been a target of Russian interference. “This support may help to provide a better understanding of previous issues and help to secure the 2020 elections,” Sara Sendek, a DHS spokesperson told NPR. She added that the agency “has no information that there is any previous or ongoing issues regarding elections systems” in the state.

Oops! Flint Mayor Karen Weaver’s proposed $55.6 million budget, which is set to begin July 1, does not include $280,000 to fund 400 election workers for the August 6 primary. “They erroneously left the $280,000 out,” Flint City Clerk Inez Brown said at a budget hearing according to MichiganLive. “This is a mistake that they’ve made. The funding isn’t included in the books they’ve presented.” Deputy Chief Finance Officer, Tamar Lewis said the finance department is trying to fix the mistake. “We’re trying to find the money for the election workers,” Lewis told MLive. “We’re pulling from different departments to get that.”

In November 2020, in addition to president, federal, state and local races, voters in Nevada will be deciding on a ballot measure that if successful would create a declaration of voters’ rights within the state’s constitution. According to Ballotpedia News the measure would provide registered voters with other constitutional rights, including:

  • to have questions about voting procedures answered and have voting procedures posted in a visible location at the polling place;
  • to vote without intimidation, threats, or coercion;
  • to vote during any early-voting period or on election day if the voter is in line at the time polls close;
  • to return a spoiled ballot and receive a replacement ballot;
  • to request assistance in voting if necessary;
  • to a sample ballot “which is accurate, informative and delivered in a timely manner;”
  • to receive instruction on how to use voting equipment;
  • to equal access to the elections system without discrimination, including on the basis of “race, age, disability, military service, employment or overseas residence.”
  • to a “uniform, statewide standard for counting and recounting all votes accurately;” and
  • to have “complaints about elections and election contests resolved fairly, accurately and efficiently.”

The NFL is going for two in its efforts respond to the debate about protests of injustice and police violence. It was announced this week that the organization had awarded a $100,000 grant to the Louisiana-based group VOTE. According to The New Orleans Advocate, Norris Henderson, VOTE’s executive director, said the group intends to use the money on a statewide push to register former inmates to vote. The campaign is made possible by a new state law that allows people who have been out of prison for five years to cast ballots even if they remain on probation and parole.

Cheers! Independence Brewing in Austin, Texas is rolling out Freak Power, a blood-orange hefeweizen that takes its name from Hunter S. Thompson’s campaign for sheriff. Brewery employees will be deputized as volunteer voter registrars for Travis County and the brewery will also hold a voter registration drive. “With Freak Power, we sought to create something that ignites enthusiasm the way Hunter S. Thompson did back in 1970,” Independence’s president and co-founder Amy Cartwright said in a news release.

Personnel News: Ed Shafer has retired from the Marion County, Ohio board of elections after 30 years with the board. Kim Barbetta is the new Brooke County, West Virginia clerk. Cecelia “Cooky” Borths is the new Charlevoix County, Michigan clerk. Cliff Dressel has been sworn in as the new chief deputy registrar of voters in St. Mary Parish, Louisiana. Neera Bahl has been appointed to the Cobb County, Georgia board of elections. Former South Dakota Secretary of State Shantel Krebs is now the chairwoman of Miss America. Mitch Ceasar, former Democrat chair, has filed to run for Broward County supervisor of elections.

Research and Report Summaries

Stanford University’s Cyber Policy Center released a report on securing U.S. elections this week. Edited by former U.S. Ambassador to Russia Michael McFaul, the report, Securing American Elections: Prescriptions for Enhancing the Integrity and Independence of the 2020 U.S. Presidential Election and Beyond, discusses Russia’s actions and intentions in 2016, strengthening U.S. election infrastructure, regulating online political advertising by foreign nationals and governments, combatting disinformation, and deterring foreign interference, among other topics. The report offers 45 policy recommendations, including several regarding election administration and policy:

  • Require that all vote-counting systems provide a voter-verified paper audit trail.
  • Require risk-limited auditing for all elections.
  • Assess the security of computerized election-related systems in an adversarial manner.
  • Commit regular funding streams to strengthen the cybersecurity posture of the election infrastructure.
  • Retain the designation of election infrastructure as critical infrastructure.

The Open Source Election Technology Institute released a position paper on election technology certification last week. The paper, Rethinking Election Technology Certification: New Cybersecurity Threats Require New Thinking on Testing and Certification, examines the existing framework for testing and certifying voting systems and early thinking on creating a framework for testing and certifying other types of election technology, such as electronic pollbooks, election night reporting, and voter registration systems.

Nonprofit VOTE released a report on new voter engagement by non-profit organizations last week. The report, Engaging New Voters: If Nonprofits Don’t, Who Will?, finds that young adults, low-income, Hispanic, and Asian communities participate in elections at lower rates than other socio-economic and demographic groups. To support such voters in the 2018 elections, Nonprofit VOTE worked with 64 nonprofits in 6 states, engaging more than 22,500 voters through mailers, text messages, and live phone calls. Those engaged by the program were 11 percent more likely to vote than demographically matched registered voters who were not engaged.

All Voting is Local released a report on provisional ballot usage in Ohio last week. The report, Rejected: How the Provisional Ballot System in Franklin County, Ohio Fails Voters, finds that voters in Franklin County – particularly black, low-income, and young voters – cast a disproportionate number of provisional ballots compared to the statewide electorate. The report recommends increased poll worker training and recruitment, and expanded voter education in the county.

(Research and Report Summaries are written by David Kuennen.)

Legislative Updates

California: Under Assembly Bill 1036 the secretary of state would be required to upgrade governing county voter outreach programs and would be encouraged to provide additional support to counties with the lowest voter registration rates. The bill also establishes a High School Voter Education Pilot Program in Yolo County. The pilot allows county officials to conduct student government elections using voting machines and custom ballots in order to teach youth how to vote and encourage future voter participation.

Connecticut: An effort to approve a bill, backed by Secretary of State Denise Merrill, that would automatically register residents to vote fell victim to the threat of a filibuster in the waning hours of the legislative session.

District of Columbia: Councilmember Robert White (I At-large) has introduced legislation that will repeal a 1955 law which disenfranchises District residents upon their conviction. While DC automatically restores the rights of felons once they are released from incarceration, the new bill would allow those still serving time to cast a ballot.

Also in D.C. Councilmember Brianne Nadeau (D-Ward One) has introduced a bill that would send a mail ballot to every registered voter in the District. The legislation leaves in place precinct-based voting on Election Day and leaves it up to the DC Board of Elections on how to deal with early voting sites/days.

Illinois: Under Senate Bill 2090, the voting rights of those in jail will be expanded. A person in jail awaiting trial would be able to cast a ballot, county jails with a population greater than 3 million residents would have a polling place in the jail and a person leaving jail or prison would be given a voter registration application and information on the voting rights.

Louisiana: By a unanimous vote, the Senate has approve a bill that will allow voters to use a military ID as a form of ID in order to cast a ballot.

Maine: The House has approved a bill that would create a system of automatic voter registration at the state’s Bureau of Motor Vehicles.

Massachusetts: The city of Springfield has given initial approval to a city-sponsored get out the vote effort. Under the proposed ordinance, the city will pay to send out postcards and robocalls reminding voters of upcoming local elections.

Nevada: Gov. Steve Sisolak (D) has vetoed a bill that would have included Nevada in the National Popular Vote compact.

Also in Nevada, in the closing hours of the 2019 session, the Senate approved a bill that will allow for same-day voter registration.

New Hampshire: The Senate voted 14-10 along party lines to approve a bill that will essentially repeal a 2017 law requiring additional documentation from voters who register within 30 days of an election.

By a 13 to 11 vote, the Senate approved a bill that will allow for no-excuse absentee voting.

The House has defeated a bill that would have prohibited secretary of state candidates from making political contributions.

New Mexico: The Albuquerque city council has decided not to take up whether or not to move the city to a system of ranked choice voting and instead is considering having it added to an upcoming ballot to give residents a chance to decide.

North Carolina: Gov. Roy Cooper (D) has signed a bill into law that alters the rules on how student and government employee ID cards can qualify as voter ID cards.

Pennsylvania: The Senate has approved a bill that would move local elections in Ronda to even-numbered years.

Under House Bill 1579, voters in Pennsylvania would have to show some form of ID, including a bank statement or government check, in order to cast a ballot.

Oregon: The House has approved Senate Bill 870 by a 37-22 vote. If signed into law, the bill will include Oregon in the National Popular Vote compact.

Rhode Island: A bill proposed by Secretary of State Nellie Gorbea that would remove birth dates from the list of publicly available voter data has been sent back to the Judiciary Committee for further review.

Vermont: The Legislature did not take action on proposed charter amendments in Montpelier and Brattleboro. The Montpelier amendment would allow noncitizens to vote in local elections and the Brattleboro amendment would lower the voting age to 16 in local elections.

Legal Updates

Georgia: U.S. District Judge Steve Jones has rejected the state’s motion to dismiss a lawsuit brought by voting advocates alleging far-reaching voting problems last year during the gubernatorial election.

Indiana: The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit has vacated a consent decree reached between Common Cause Indiana, the Indianapolis NAACP and the Marion County Election Board. The agreement, which was approved for U.S. District Court Judge Sarah Evans Baker called for adding more early voting sites. In the appeal,  state AG argued that the federal court acted against the public’s interest by interfering in the administration of elections. While this was all going on in court, the county moved to a vote center system which made the entire case more or less moot.

Michigan: The Eastpointe city council this week announced a settlement in a federal lawsuit over the rights of black voters. Through a four-year consent decree, the city will become the first in the state to use a ranked choice voting system.

This week, Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson announced plans for a college-age get out the vote effort which is expected to help resolve a lawsuit filed by the College Democrats last year. According The Detroit News, Initial steps include the creation of a website dedicated to advice for first-time voters and college students, a written update for local clerks in college towns suggesting voter registration drives and more frequent deployment of a mobile SOS office to campuses.

Mississippi: Four African-American voters have filed a lawsuit against Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann and the state GOP accusing the state of violating the 14th and 15th Amendment as well as a section of the Voting Rights Act. “Absent court intervention, the challenged provisions will continue to infringe upon the constitutional and statutory rights of African American voters in Mississippi, dilute African American votes and violate the one-person, one-vote principle in the upcoming general election and in every statewide election for years to come,” the complaint Mississippi read.

Pennsylvania: Oral arguments were heard this week in a lawsuit filed by a group of voters who claim they were disenfranchised saying that the state’s earlier deadline for absentee ballots is unconstitutional.

Tennessee: Attorney General Herbert Slatery is asking a federal judge is asking a federal judge to dismiss the lawsuit brought against the state’s new voter registration law which penalizes third-party registration groups. In his filings Slatery argued that the law has not taken effect yet so claims in the lawsuit are moot.

Washington: The Washington State Association of Counties has indicated that it will be filing suit against the state in the coming days for what they are calling an unfunded mandate requiring counties to provide at least one ballot dropbox in every city and town within their jurisdiction.

Tech Thursday

Websites: Congratulations to the National Association of Secretaries of State (NASS) for receiving a silver award from the Horizon International Award competition for the association’s recently redesigned website. An international panel of judges, consisting of industry professionals with diverse backgrounds, evaluated categories ranging from online advertising to mobile applications. The 2018 winning entries showcase the industry’s best interactive media solutions, including: websites, mobile applications, print media, interactive displays, public exhibits, online advertising, video, email and more.

Opinions This Week

National Opinions: Election reform | Voter registration, II | Election security, II, III | 2020 | Suffrage, II, III, IV | Voter data

California: Vote centers

Connecticut: Early voting

Florida: 2018 election | Election security

Indiana: Voting rights | Turnout

Michigan: Vote-by-mail

Missouri: HR 1

Nevada: Turnout

New Mexico: Ranked choice voting

New York: Automatic voter registration

Pennsylvania: Election security

Texas: Voter ID | Secretary of state, II | List maintenance | Voting equipment

Virginia: Election security

Wisconsin: Suffrage

Upcoming Events

Common Data Formats for Election Systems Webinar — We’ve been talking about common data formats for years, but what are they really? We will discuss the history of their development, benefits and potential use cases. We’ll also provide resources for implementation and how to get started. When: June 21, 12:30 EDT. Where: Online

National Association of Secretaries Of State — The National Association of Secretaries of State will hold their annual summer conference in late June, early July in New Mexico. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registrations. When: June 30-July 3. Where: Santa Fe, New Mexico.

International Association of Government Officials — “Educate-Elevate-Energize-Engage” is the theme of this year’s annual conference. The conference will include numerous education sessions and workshops as well as a visit to the NASA Houston Space Center. Where: Houston. When: July 11-17.

National Association of Counties — NACo’s 2019 Annual Conference will be held in Clark County (Las Vegas). Although the schedule and keynote speakers are still being hammered out there will be two symposiums on disaster management including an interactive roundtable. When: July 12-15. Where: Las Vegas.

National Association of State Election Directors — The NASED Summer Conference will be held in Austin, Texas, July 14-16, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Conference of State Legislatures: NCSL’s Legislative Summit will feature numerous elections-related sessions include several about redistricting, voter registration, infrastructure and the Census. And if that wasn’t enough, Dolly Parton will be one of the featured keynote speakers.  When: August 5-8. Where: Nashville.

Election Center 35th Annual National Conference: This year’s Conference attendees will be inspired and energized as we head into the final stretch of the 2019 Election year. We will share substantive elections issues including crucial critical infrastructure information, new election initiatives and tons of practical and meaningful election administration tools and resources including the newest innovations and ideas to help election officials as the 2020 presidential year quickly approaches. When: Aug. 17-24. Where: Orlando.

Job Postings This Week

electionlineWeekly publishes election administration job postings each week as a free service to our readers. To have your job listed in the newsletter, please send a copy of the job description, including a web link to mmoretti@electionline.org.  Job postings must be received by 5pm on Wednesday in order to appear in the Thursday newsletter. Listings will run for three weeks or till the deadline listed in the posting.

Bilingual Resources and Marketing Specialist, Gwinnett County, Georgia —  Gwinnett County Voter Registration and Elections is responsible for planning and organizing all election voter-related activities and assist Gwinnett’s cities and special districts with election preparations. The division is comprised of staff that are proud to be part of a team that works together to assure that every vote counts. This position will be responsible for marketing and outreach for our Elections Division. The incumbent will create marketing material, work with community partners/organizations and conduct outreach related to Gwinnett County’s Election Division and the Bilingual Election Law (Sec. 203 of the Voting Rights Act). The incumbent must be proficient in oral, written and reading comprehension of the Spanish language. The primary responsibility for this position will be to educate and inform various community organizations, registered and prospective voters about election processes in both English and Spanish. The incumbent will also be required to set up and take down tables, display boards and various marketing materials for public events. Salary: $42,1620 $48,486. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Customer Support Consultant, Hart InterCivic— The Customer Support Consultant is responsible for providing application and hardware support to Hart InterCivic customers via telephone and email for all Hart InterCivic products.  The Support Consultant is also responsible for monitoring all requests to ensure efficient, effective resolution. The successful CSC will work directly with customers and other staff members. The position is responsible for responding to customer contacts, dealing with issues in a professional manner, providing technical direction to customers in a manner they can understand and being a customer advocate.  The CSC must have outstanding written and verbal communication skills. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Deputy Director, Center for Election Innovation & Research— the Deputy Director will report to the Executive Director and have a broad range of responsibilities designed to support CEIR’s mission. In this position, the Deputy Director will play an integral role in the development and execution of CEIR’s programming, strategic communications, and continued growth as an organization. This is an excellent opportunity for an experienced and highly motivated individual who wants to make a substantial, positive, nonpartisan impact on elections and American democracy. The Deputy Director’s primary workplace will be CEIR’s Washington, DC office. The Deputy Director also must be available for business travel as needed. CEIR believes that working alongside and understanding the diverse mix of people who are affected by elections and American democracy is key to achieving our mission. That’s why we’re proud to be an equal opportunity employer committed to creating a diverse, non-discriminatory work environment. We recruit, employ, train, compensate, and promote regardless of race, religion, color, national origin, sex, disability, age, veteran status, and other protected status as required by applicable law. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Director of Elections/General Registrar, Stafford County, Virginia — this is a four-year term position appointed by the Electoral Board with a starting date of July 1, 2019 and an end date of June 30, 2023. Multiple terms are allowed. The Stafford County Electoral Board is seeking a Director of Elections/General Registrar to provide professional and technical leadership to the Office of The General Registrar and manage the planning, overseeing, and administering of voter registration and elections in Stafford County’s 28 precincts for our 95,000 registered voters. The Director is responsible for ensuring the necessary resources are acquired and in place to maintain the list of registered voters and assure elections are well-prepared and conducted in an accurate, efficient, and transparent manner. Salary: $100k-$108 DOQ. Deadline: June 9. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Election Clerk 2, Pierce County, Washington – This position primarily involves data entry and processing of voter registration transactions, with moderate to heavy customer service interactions (phone and in-person) for 4-5 weeks prior to an election. Maintain voter registration/elections database. Key and update voter registration information from paper forms, Department of Licensing and on-line submittals. Register new voters, updates voter addresses and researches voter registration records. Provide customer service information at the front counter and over the telephone. Understand content, intent, and applicability of the Revised Code of Washington (RCW) and the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) as they apply to election activities. Coordinate, perform, and complete multiple duties and assignments concurrently and in a timely manner. Process records using the state voter registration database. Issue ballots to voters. Respond to customers using the PC Elections email account. Assist on special projects. Research voters’ records to ensure proper counting of ballots. Assist Election Specialists as assigned. Provide information for candidates regarding candidate filing. Perform essential voter registration functions of an Election Clerk 1. Communicate effectively verbally and in writing to audiences of various social, cultural, ethnic, educational and economic backgrounds Other duties as assigned. Salary: $24.41 – $30.55 Hourly. Deadline: June 16. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Election Coordinator, Solano County, California— The Elections Coordinator is a supervisor who is charged with successfully overseeing a specific election function – this could be either Voter Registration, Vote by Mail, Candidate Services, or Poll Places/Poll Workers.  Each of the four Coordinators within our office are rotated every four years for cross-training and expanding job knowledge. Additional duties involve participating in developing, updating and implementing office procedures to comply with Federal and State laws; training staff and potentially poll workers; working with community stakeholders in achieving our mission; or coordinating the work of contractors that assist with our operation.  The Ideal candidates will have experience in conducting elections and supervising employees. Skills in Microsoft Office applications including Access and Excel; Geographic information systems such as ArcMap; or experience with web design and adobe software packages are beneficial. Salary: $33.41 – $40.61 hourly. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Director, Coconino County, Arizona— Under general direction performs work of unusual difficulty directing the strategic and operational functions of the Elections Department; performs related work as assigned. Typical Duties: In partnership with the Board of Supervisors, County Recorder and County Manager, determines the goals, objectives, and operational priorities of the Elections Division. Under limited supervision plans, organizes, coordinates and directs election administration functions for which the County has responsibility. Coordinates Elections Division activities with the Voter Registration Division. Develops and revises procedures, forms, schedules and policies for the preparation and conduct of elections. Ensures all voting procedures are in compliance with Arizona State Statutes, Arizona Secretary of State’s Election Procedures manual and federal statutes. Remains current of changes in election methods, election information management systems and voting hardware and software.  Ensures quality control of all aspects of elections. Develops and manages the division’s budget. Responsible for review and oversight of contracts with vendors. Hires, supervises, evaluates and disciplines staff. Prepares and updates records and reports. Responsible for retention of election materials in accordance with the state retention schedule. Coordinates with state, cities, towns, and special districts for election services though Intergovernmental Agreements. Responsible for all candidate filing activities for people running for county elected offices. Ensures the necessary information and forms are available to candidates and political committees and that candidate and committee filings are maintained in accordance with all applicable laws. Responsible for campaign finance and financial disclosure filing activities to ensure that all required deadlines are met and reports are maintained in accordance with all applicable laws. Coordinates county, state, federal and jurisdictional ballot orders, layout and proofing along with ordering and distribution of regular and early ballots. Responsible for ensuring that ballots are designed to meet 100% accuracy of content and statutory requirements. Ensures that ballots are printed, delivered and tested and meet all necessary and legal deadlines. Responsible for the security, auditing and accountability of all election materials and equipment. Responsible for the accurate programming and maintenance of elections programs, electronic pollbooks and tabulation units. Responsible for activating and deactivating cellular or WiFi services for electronic pollbooks, including testing reception from every voting location in the county prior to every election. Responsible for internal and public logic and accuracy testing of all the voting equipment. Responsible for acquiring and maintaining all election equipment and materials needed for conduct of elections. Responsible for the development and conduct of training for all election personnel, including election board workers. Responsible for identifying and contracting with the voting locations for all early and Election Day voting. Ensures all voting locations comply with Federal law and the Americans with Disabilities Act. Responsible for all ballot tabulation activities. Verifies elections results and distributes reports to the Board of Supervisors and other. jurisdictions for post-election canvassing. Responsible for the conduct of the post-election hand audit. Supervises the filing, archiving, disposal or destruction of election materials in compliance with applicable laws, rules and regulations. Salary: $87,161.00 – $100,235.00 Annually. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Lead Specialist, Douglas County, Colorado— The Elections Lead Specialist assists in the supervision and coordination of elections operations, staff, and election judges including voter services, mail ballot processing and the conduct of elections. The objective of this position is to perform a variety of functions and diverse support roles on a routine basis. Mail Ballot Processing responsibilities are prioritized over other duties during election cycles, which may increase or decrease dramatically depending on the Elections cycle. In the absence of the Operations Manager, assumes responsibility for front-line functions associated with elections operations. This is a highly visible position requiring exceptional leadership, organizational, and communication skills. Salary: $3,550-$4,438 monthly. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Election Specialist I, Douglas County, Colorado — This position is focused on routine customer service and general office/clerical support including data entry, communications, and processing mail. This is a support role capable of performing a variety of tasks, with problem solving abilities, managing multiple competing responsibilities and prioritizing to maintain a continuous flow of election office operations. This is a visible and crucial position requiring exceptional computer, customer service, and communication skills. This is a benefited part-time position and benefits are pro-rated to 30 hours per week. This is an open until filled posting, review of applications and interviews will begin immediately and continue until suitable candidates are selected. Salary: $16.40-$20.50/hourly. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Election Specialist II, Douglas County, Colorado— The Election Specialist II is responsible for routine support services related to temporary employees, training, Voter Service and Polling Centers, mail ballot processing, voter registration, and customer service. This position contributes to the department’s achievement of delivering efficient, transparent, fair and accurate elections as well as performs other projects as assigned. This position requires technical work in a lead role capable of performing a variety of complex tasks, with solving problem abilities, managing multiple competing tasks and prioritizing to maintain a continuous flow of operations and temporary support. This is a visible and crucial position requiring previous elections experience, and exceptional computer, customer service, and communication skills. Please note this position is posted as open until filled, review of applications will begin immediately and continue until a suitable candidate is selected. Salary: $3,214 – $4,017 Monthly. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Executive Director, State Democracy Project— The inaugural Executive Director will provide the strategic and forward-thinking leadership needed to take our vision and make it a reality. With an eye to deepening relationships and taking bold action, the ED will ensure that the SDP works in genuine ongoing partnership with the dozens of national and state organizations that actively participate in the project. The ED will also organize and utilize the talent, resources, and relationships critical for near-term wins on structural democracy reforms.This position will report to the Board of Directors, which is comprised of coalition partner representatives. It will be the ED’s responsibility to manage all that comes with establishing a startup based on a coalitional model. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

IT Support Specialist, Collier County, Florida— The IT Support Specialist works closely with IT staff to provide technical support and assistance to all staff located within the Supervisor of Elections office. This person will work with a wide variety of elections industry specific technologies to include hardware, software, programming, printers, and applications. In addition, this person will be providing support and assistance for non-election industry networking technology to include workstations, servers, printers, etc. The primary areas of responsibility for the IT Department include Network and associated Infrastructure, Hardware and Software Support, Database Administration, Daily Backup and Recovery, Disaster Recovery, Voting Equipment and Related Technologies to include Ballot Design and Tabulation, a variety of Programs, and Geographic Information Systems. The IT Support Specialist’s duties include hardware support including but not limited to, file servers (virtual and physical), storage (SAN and NAS), workstations (desktops and laptops), switches, printers, and scanners (image and barcode). Support also includes all election related equipment. Software support includes software applications for both election and non-election related software products. Applications include but are not limited to a variety of Microsoft applications (Windows 7 & 10, SQL, Access, Excel, Outlook, Power Point, Projects, Visio, Word), Adobe products (Acrobat, Reader) Photo Shop, as well as industry specific voter registration software. Other responsibilities include a variety of administrative tasks such as reports and logs. Accuracy and attention to detail is crucial. Salary: $45,000 – $60,000 annually. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Program Officer: Elections and Political Processes — The National Democratic Institute for International Affairs (NDI) seeks a Program Officer to join its Election and Political Processes Team and work with NDI’s regional teams, country teams, local partners, and international partners to advance electoral integrity, promote accountability and encourage citizen engagement in electoral processes. The Program Officer will work with other members of the Election and Political Processes Team to support: country-level programs, which involve citizen election monitoring (including parallel vote tabulations (PVTs)); international election observation efforts; international workshops, academies and conferences; and global initiatives, including, for example, the Open Election Data Initiative (OEDI). This position is based in Washington, DC and will require periodic travel. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Project Manager, Hart InterCivic— Project Managers at Hart InterCivic are highly motivated “self-starters” who are enthusiastic about providing exceptional customer service. Working with other members of the Professional Services and Operations teams, the Project Manager directs activity, solves problems, and develops lasting and strong relationships with our customers. Hart InterCivic’s unique and industry known culture of innovation, transparency, and customer-centric focus creates an environment where team members will continually grow and be challenged to develop their careers. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Policy & Data Research Analyst, New York City Campaign Finance Board— The New York City Campaign Finance Board seeks a Policy & Data Research Analyst to perform original research to help inform the agency’s policy and program choices on campaign finance and voting. This position will report to the Deputy Director of Public Affairs. Responsibilities:  Under the direction of the Deputy Director of Public Affairs, design and perform analysis of campaign finance records, elections and voter participation data; Research policy and legislative issues related to campaign finance, voter participation, and election administration in New York City and New York State; Assist in preparing reports and policy briefs on campaign finance and election performance; and work with Public Affairs staff to create policy recommendations to improve the public matching funds program, voter participation, and election administration. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Product Manager, Hart InterCivic — as Product Manager, you will join a team that is charged with product planning, design, and execution throughout the lifecycle of Hart’s products, in support of the company’s overall strategy and goals. This includes: gathering, validating, and prioritizing internal and external customer needs; documenting and communicating product and technical requirements; gathering market and competitive intelligence; supporting the certification, sales, and marketing teams. The Product Manager must possess a unique blend of business and technical savvy – with experience in elections technology or other government-oriented products preferred.  To succeed in this role, the ideal candidate must spend time in the market to understand its unique attributes; demonstrate competence with specialized hardware and software; and find innovative solutions for the broader market. The Product Manager plays a key role in helping others to understand the product positioning, key benefits, and target customer, as well as providing advanced subject matter expertise in using the company’s products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Red Team Independent Contractor, Galois— Galois seeks an experienced Red Team Lead with red teaming and/or CTF experience of purported secure systems that include custom hardware to play a pivotal role in fulfilling our mission to make trustworthy critical systems. The role will be responsible for the strategic and tactical direction of a small team dedicated to red team activities. The team is responsible for developing threat simulation services, threat research, structured attack development, vulnerability research and exploit development/testing, scripting and controlled exploitation of hardware and software vulnerabilities. The scope of the position also requires understanding a complex cyber-physical system architecture to develop a precise threat model, red teaming framing, and win conditions for both the DEF CON exercises. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Research Scientist, MIT Election Data and Science Lab— MEDSL seeks a research scientist  to oversee the data science workflow of the lab’s election-related data collection, processing, and dissemination efforts.  MEDSL aims to improve the democratic experience for all U.S. voters by applying scientific principles to how elections are studied and administered. Responsibilities include assisting the director with designing and implementing research projects; gathering and analyzing data, designing research protocols, and documenting results; managing data science and quality control for the 2018 release of the Elections Performance Index (EPI); acquiring data from government sources and designing protocols to update indicators not provided by government sources; assisting with redistricting data collection/dissemination efforts; working with web designers to update EPI website and creating original content for MEDSL website; onboarding and monitoring the work of students/research support associates; tracking scholarship in the field of election science; and performing other data science/administrative/reporting duties as assigned. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Senior Research Program Specialist, U.S. Election Assistance Commission — The primary purpose of this position is to serve as the Senior Research Program Specialist for assigned research-related matters within the U.S. Election Assistance Commission’s (EAC) mission. The incumbent assists the Director for Research with administering and maintaining various research contracts and studies undertaken by the U.S. Election Assistance Commission and with the tasks related to the creation of new research studies and products. The incumbent also assists the Director of Research and other staff in maintaining relationships with stakeholders and represents EAC to state and federal legislative groups, advocacy groups, the elections community and other agencies as assigned; and performs related work on various issues pertaining to elections. Salary $61,926-$99,545. Deadline: June 7. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Software Sales Specialist, VOTEC— VOTEC’s Sales Specialist is responsible for creating news sales with prospects and existing clients in targeted areas in the US. We are looking for an election professional comfortable using insight and consultative selling techniques to create interest that offers unique solutions on their operations, which link back to VOTEC’s solutions. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Technical Bid Specialist, Scytl — The Technical Bid Specialist is an essential member of the sales team, supporting business development initiatives as well as providing support to the Marketing department. Based in our Tampa Florida, offices, the Technical Bid Specialist is in charge of managing the coordination, completion and handover of tender proposals for our clients and prospects. This is a key position with a great deal of involvement in the sales process and a decisive influence in the achievement of each deal. To be able to perform this task, the Technical Bid Specialist needs to possess a solid technical background, outstanding writing capabilities and proven experience in pre-sales or consulting endeavors, always facing the client and having to put together complex IT proposals or projects. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Marketplace

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