electionline Weekly

June 7, 2018

June 7, 2018

In Focus This Week

I. In Focus This Week

States, counties prepare for changing threat environment
Many resources available to elections officials

By Matthew V. Masterson, senior cybersecurity advisor
U.S. Department of Homeland Security

In my role at the U.S. Election Assistance Commission (EAC) and now with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), I’ve been fortunate to travel the country, interact with state and county election officials, participate in trainings, and witness the advances that officials are making to manage the risks to elections.

While securing election systems isn’t new for election officials, the threat environment changed in 2016 with nation-state actors targeting election systems. The good news is that, election officials are natural risk managers who constantly ask themselves what could go wrong and plan to respond. My job is to ensure that the federal government provides them with all the necessary threat, vulnerability and risk information in order to make those plans and respond.

I’m incredibly encouraged by the willingness of election officials across the country to engage with DHS and form a partnership. So far, officials across 48 states are engaged with us on election security efforts in some way whether through the sharing of information, use of our services or incident planning.

Their participation has been essential in forming an Election Infrastructure Information Sharing and Analysis Center (EI-ISAC), a similar model to what is used in the financial and electricity sectors. This organization provides specific information on malicious cyber activity that could be targeting election infrastructure.

With over 700 members the EI-ISAC is growing fast! This organization is free for election officials to sign up to receive election-specific cybersecurity information. I encourage all state and local elections to sign up at https://learn.cisecurity.org/ei-isac-registration

State and local election officials are also readily leveraging the security services and assessments DHS provides. Whether it is scanning to make certain that the databases and websites are configured properly, or simply phishing training for members of their staff, the election community has embraced the resources DHS can provide as part of their multi-layered cybersecurity strategies.

For more information on the services DHS is providing to state and local officials go here: https://www.dhs.gov/publication/election-infrastructure-security-resource-guide

And this is not to say that states that are not using DHS services aren’t taking the threat seriously, quite the contrary. I’ve been around the country and seen how seriously election officials are taking the threat and how they are continuing to mature as IT managers on top of all the other hats they wear.

For instance, in Indiana they are implementing two-factor authentication on their databases and increasing monitoring. Florida is deploying cyber navigators to their local officials to help support them. Orange County, California just published a comprehensive election security playbook. Denver, Colorado works collaboratively with city IT officials to provide real time threat sharing.

Many are utilizing third-party vendors or in-house services. DHS’s free services are but one of a variety of options that election officials are using to help protect, detect and recover from cyber risks.

State and local governments own and administer elections in this country, and DHS is there to support their efforts. We’re learning how to best help this community to manage their risk. Election officials are making very real progress in improving the resilience of the election process. To effectively learn how to best provide support, we have formal partnership bodies with government and private sector representatives that allow us to convene, share information, and build consensus on how to ensure the security of elections going forward.

The Election Subsector Government Coordinating Council is a representative body of 24 state and local election officials, the EAC, and DHS. It’s no accident that this council is made up overwhelming of state and local officials. Recently that group developed a guidance to help election officials determine how to use recent funding to better secure systems. The great thing about this document, is that it was developed by the election community, informed by the assessments being performed by DHS, and supports broad initiatives to advance security in both the near-term and for elections to come.

The Sector Coordinating Council coordinates between government and private industry, including the major vendors in the election equipment and services market. Vendors on the Sector council are taking advantage of DHS cybersecurity services and information sharing. Recognizing their important role in the process election system providers have been engaged and active partners with DHS.

Sometimes, it seems that so much has changed since 2011 when I first started working on elections in Ohio, but the reality is, that election community has always faced challenges, and maturing the security of this sector is just the next one. Election security has become a national priority – but for election officials, security and contingency planning has always been a priority.

I am hopeful that now, this new national attention is leading to the additional support, resources and recognition of the hard work across this community. I can say that Homeland Security is committed to that goal, and. Reach out to our Election Task Force at ElectionTaskForce@hq.dhs.gov and let us know how DHS can help.

 

Primary Updates

II. Primary Updates

The 2018 version of “Super Tuesday” occurred this week with voters in eight states heading to the polls and mailboxes. The day was a mixed bag administratively with fairly smooth sailing in some states, minor glitches in others and major headaches in some too.

Alabama: Twenty-six counties in Alabama rolled out e-poll books for the first time this election and overall the new voter check-in system seemed to work well with poll workers. In Dothan, some voters were confused about new polling locations. There was a bit of a kerfuffle in Mobile when Rep. Barbara Drummond, who was on the ballot for re-election, went to the polling place to vote only to find out she had been removed from the rolls because she was dead. Turns out, her sister-in-law, who had passed away, had the same name. The chief clerk from Mobile happened to be the polling location and sorted out the problem. In exciting news, apparently there are new “I Voted” stickers in Alabama. The new stickers feature the stars and stripes in the shape of the state with the words “I Voted” on the stickers. And in the race for secretary of state, incumbent Republican John Merrill will face Democratic challenger Heather Milam.

California: With more registered voters than most states have residents, just about anything can happen in California on an election day. The two big stories out The Golden State this year was the roll out the state’s new vote-by-mail/vote center system and how more than 100,000 people were somehow left off the voter rolls in Los Angeles County.

Overall, the roll out of the new voting system seemed to work well, although some voters did express their sadness about no longer relying on neighborhood polling places. And in Sacramento County, some voters who showed up at old polling places wondered if the ballots they left would be counted.

In Los Angeles County, at 1,530 voting locations, 118,522 voters were left off the polls due to what Los Angeles Registrar-Recorder/County Clerk Dean Logan said was a printing error. Entire streets were left off the rolls and even California’s more notable residents were not immune. Logan appeared at a special hearing before the county board of supervisors on Wednesday.

There were a smattering of other problems throughout the state. In Tulare County, election results were delayed on Tuesday night. In Amador County, polling places ran out of ballots. A polling place was forced to relocate in Sonoma County due to wild fires. Voters in San Francisco faced long lines at some polling places. A San Diego polling place was briefly evacuated after a suspicious device was reported. Software glitches in San Mateo County forced some voters to use provisional ballots.

And although there are still a lot of ballots to be counted at press time, incumbent Secretary of state Alex Padilla (D) will face Mark Meuser (R) in November.

Iowa: The biggest pre-primary concern, the roll out of the state’s new voter ID law, turned out to be the least talked about issue of the day, although not everyone was happy about it. And several counties ran into a new problem with the law…left behind IDs. The biggest issue that some voters seemed to face on primary day was an anonymous text message with erroneous polling place information. It turns out the text messages were mistakenly sent by a campaign. A software glitch in Story County forced some voters to complete their voter eligibility forms manually. In Pottawattamie County, a water main break lead to a change in polling places for Council Bluffs voters. And in the race for secretary of state, incumbent Republican Paul Pate will face Democratic challenger Deidre DeJear.

Mississippi: Issues with a server kept two precincts in Oktibbeha County from being counted on election night, but other than that, it was a quiet primary day in Mississippi.

Montana: With a turnout of around 41 percent, the highest mid-term primary turnout since 1994, it was a more or less a smooth day. “What we do here is look for big problems, and we didn’t have them,” Secretary of state Corey Stapleton told KTVH. “We didn’t have any equipment failures; we didn’t have ballots that didn’t feed into the system. We were able to avoid some of the pitfalls from the past.”

New Jersey: Overall, it was a quiet day in The Garden State, but two issues stood out. First, in Hudson County, voting irregularities were reported at multiple voting locations in Hoboken with one polling place opening three hours late due to voting machine problems. And in Passaic County, a poll worker in the town of Wayne was arrested and charged with possession of heroin, being under the influence of a controlled substance, possession of paraphernalia and possession of narcotics in a motor vehicle

New Mexico: Slow, steady and routine are three words that were used to describe primary day in The Land of Enchantment. One thing that may have lead to a smooth election day were the number of early ballots cast this year. Colfax County did have to put back-up plans into place for some voters who had been evacuated due to the Ute Park Fire. In the race for secretary of state, incumbent Democrat Maggie Toulouse Oliver will face Republican challenger Johanna Cox. Both ran unopposed.

South Dakota: While Alabama saw a smooth roll out of e-poll books on Tuesday, things were anything but smooth for several South Dakota counties using the devices including Brown, Hughes, Hyde, Pennington, Sully, and Yankton. The problems forced polls to stay open late in several jurisdictions. Secretary of State Shatel Krebs, who lost her primary bid for U.S. representative issued a statement saying that the e-poll book problem was not statewide and that it was an issue between the individual counties and the vendor.

Election News This Week

III. Election News This Week

New Louisiana Secretary of State Kyle Ardoin said this week, that it could cost up to $60 million to replace the state’s 10,000 aging voting machines. Unlike most states where individual counties purchase and control voting machines, in Louisiana the state owns all the voting machines. According to Ardoin, between federal funds and money budgeted there is only about $10 million available. The state will receive oral presentations from three firms next week with the goal to replace the voting machines by 2020.

Perhaps this is where some of our holiday cards have gone. Last month, the New York City Board of Elections received two packages of near 2,000 pieces of First Class mail from the U.S. Postal Service that included hundreds of absentee ballots that should have been counted in the November 2017 election. According to WNYC, on package contained 533 absentee ballots postmarked on November 7 which should have been counted. Another package contained 280 ballots that were received after Election Day. “For some undetermined reason, some baskets of mail that were bound to the New York City Board of Elections were put off to the side at the Brooklyn processing facility and eventually discovered, and upon discovery, delivered to the Board of Elections,” New York City Board of Elections Executive Michael Ryan said. In a letter to the NYCBOE, the Postal Service alleges that there was an agreement for the BOE to come pick up the ballots.

With less than a week to go till Maine’s roll out of ranked-choice voting, Maine Public Radio reporter Steve Mistler joined several voters as they filled out their absentee ballot using the new system. Mistler noted the voters seemed less confused about the new voting system than they did about the referendum question about whether or not to keep the new system in place. It’s an interesting listen about how people are making their choices with the new system.

Oregon Secretary of State Dennis Richardson announced this week that he was diagnosed with brain cancer in May and is currently undergoing treatment. “We caught it early. I have a treatment plan in place, and I have an exceptional support system here at work and at home,” Richardson wrote in a newsletter to constituents. In a video on Facebook, Richardson said: “I’m on the job. I’m going to continue. I absolutely will fulfill my responsibilities.” He promised to keep the public updated on his prognosis. We here at electionline would like to wish the secretary good luck in his battle.

Personnel News: Jevon Williams has been sworn in as a member of the St. Croix, USVI elections board. Cameron Sasnett has been fired as the Fairfax County, Virginia general registrar. Thomas A. Nichols has been voted to another four-year term as the Republican St. Lawrence County, New York elections commissioner. Incumbent Minnesota Secretary of State Steve Simon received the DFL endorsement at the party’s nominating convention. Challenger Josh Zakim has received the Democratic endorsement for Massachusetts secretary of state at the party’s nominating convention. Orange County, New York Board of Elections Democratic Commissioner Susan Bahren is retiring on July 6 after 29 years on the job. Diane Ferguson is the new Columbia County, Arkansas clerk. Pat Gabrione is retiring as assistant director of the Lake County, Indiana election and registration board.

Legislative Updates

IV. Legislative Updates

Louisiana: Gov. John Bel Edwards has signed legislation into law that will automatically restore the voting rights to ex-felons five years after they are released from prison. Approximately 2,000 will receive their voting rights right away.

New Mexico: The Las Cruces city council voted this week to use the ranked-choice voting system for local elections beginning in late 2019.

Pennsylvania: State Rep. Kevin Boyle has introduced a bill that would establish the first Saturday and Sunday in November as voting days.

Legal Updates

V. Legal Updates

Arizona: Secretary of State Michele Reagan and Maricopa County Recorder Adrian Fontes have reached a settlement with the United Latin American Citizens which had sued over the state’s two-tiered voter registration system. Under the proposed settlement, voters will still need to be citizens to vote in state elections, but will no longer have to provide proof of citizenship with their application. Their citizenship status will be checked automatically by the state against the Department of Motor Vehicles database.

Georgia: The clock is ticking on a lawsuit filed in July of 2017 that would force the state to use all paper ballots in the November 2018 election. According to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, the plaintiffs, a group of election integrity activists and voters, say the courts need to step in to safeguard democracy in Georgia. Legislation to replace the state’s electronic voting machines failed to pass at the Georgia Capitol this year, and tech experts have repeatedly shown how malware could change election results.

Indiana: According to The Indiana Lawyer, Chief Judge Theresa Springmann recently certified a class of roughly 150 individuals who were held in the Allen County Jail on November 8, 2016. This paves the way for the inmates to sue the county sheriff for failing to provide them with a way to cast their ballot.

Maryland: Anne Arundel County Circuit Court Judge William Mulford rule against a Democratic candidate for governor who wanted ballots reprinted to include her name after her running mate died. According to The Sun, Mulford said he didn’t believe there was time to reprint ballots for the June 26 primary. He also said another potential remedy to apply stickers to ballots to show the change without adequate testing could gum up voting machines and potentially cause “havoc.”

New Jersey: Superior Court Assignment Judge Stuart Minkowitz ruled that a Morris County town with a large Hispanic population did not have to provide ballots or other election materials in Spanish for the June primary. Minkowitz ruled that director of the U.S. Census Bureau— not Morris County Clerk Ann Grossi— must determine the percentage of English-proficient Latino voters in Dover and whether the official ballot should be bilingual.

Tennessee: The Knox County board has settled a lawsuit with the Galesburg Election Commission. The election commission filed the suit after the county failed to pay the commission’s executive director and assistant director the amount commission had set.

Texas: The 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has temporarily block a lower court’s order that would have forced the state to implement online voter registration for Texas drivers.

Tech Thursday

VI. Tech Thursday

Cybersecurity: Synack announced Tuesday its offering free crowdsourced remote penetration testing services to state and local governments until November. Synack co-founder Jay Kaplan told CyberScoop the idea came together after a series of meetings with government officials, including top executives at the Department of Homeland Security, that discussed how the private sector could be doing more to ward off digital meddling. After Synack’s services are completed, states and localities can harden their systems based on the test’s results.

California: Yolo County debuted new interactive maps on the county’s elections website this week. The map is a pilot project partnering the elections office with esri, a mapping software and spatial data analytics technology company. Users will be able to click on individual precincts throughout the city and county to view exact vote counts for seven races.

Maryland: The Maryland State Board of Elections had to temporarily pull down the state’s online voter registration system this week on registration deadline day. The system was taken offline after reports slow response on the site.

Opinions This Week

VII. Opinions This Week

National Opinions: Ranked-choice voting | Voter suppression | Voter registration | Ex-felon voting rights

California: Poll workers | Voting at the polls |Voter apathy | Ranked choice voting

Florida: Broward County | Cybersecurity

Iowa: Voter ID, II, III | Turnout

Kentucky: Write-ins

Louisiana: Secretary of state race

Maine: Ranked-choice voting, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII

Massachusetts: Secretary of state race

New Hampshire: Student voting | Election legislation

New Jersey: Paper ballots

Ohio: Voting system | Ranked-choice voting

Pennsylvania: Youth voter registration

South Carolina: Voting system

Texas: Motor voter

Utah: Voting rights

Upcoming Events

VIII. Upcoming Events

Cybersecurity Online Training Series — The Center for Technology and Civic Life (CTCL) is partnering with the Center for Democracy and Technology (CDT) to deliver a new cybersecurity training series designed for election officials this July. The series will include 3 courses that will empower your election office to manage cyber threats and communicate with the public about cybersecurity.  After completing the series, you’ll have more confidence to safeguard against and respond to cyber threats in your election office. When: July 10, July 24 and July 31. Where: Online.

Election Data Summit — The U.S. Election Assistance Commission and Pennsylvania Department of State will host an Election Data Summit at the Community College of Philadelphia. The gathering will take place prior to the National Association of Secretaries of State (NASS) and National Association of State Election Directors (NASED) summer conferences in Philadelphia. This unique summit will bring together some of the nation’s most respected election data experts to examine ways election officials can use all types of data to improve processes and inform decision making. Each of the summit’s four panels will focus on a distinct aspect of the election cycle and explore different sources for election data, including voter registration databases, electronic poll books, voting equipment, and post-election audits. This event is open to the public and the media. RSVPs are required and space is limited. Additional information regarding speakers is forthcoming. When: July 12. Where: Philadelphia

NASS 2018 Summer Conference — Mark your calendars now for the National Association of Secretaries of State 2018 summer conference in the City of Brotherly Love. Check back soon for more information about the agenda. When: July 13-16. Where: Philadelphia.

2018 NASED Summer Meeting — Mark your calendars now for the National Association of State Election Directors’ 2018 summer meeting in the City of Brotherly Love. Check back soon for more information about the agenda. When: July 13-16. Where: Philadelphia.

NACo Annual Conference and Exposition — Mark your calendars now for the National Association of Counties Annual Conference and Exposition in Music City. Check back soon for more information about the agenda. When: July 13-16. Where: Nashville, Tennessee.

2018 iGo Annual Conference — Mark your calendars now for the International Association of Government Officials 2018 Annual Conference in The Biggest Little City in the World! Check back soon for more information about the agenda. When: July 16-21. Where: Reno, Nevada.

Election Sciences Reform and Administration (ESRA) — The conference brings together political scientists and other experts in election administration to develop rigorous empirical approaches to the study of how law and administrative procedures affect the quality of elections in the United States. Participants will identify major questions in the field, share new insights, foster collaboration between election administrators and election scientists, and connect senior and junior scholars. When: July 26 and 27. Where: University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Job Postings This Week

IX. Job Postings This Week
electionlineWeekly publishes election administration job postings each week as a free service to our readers. To have your job listed in the newsletter, please send a copy of the job description, including a web link to mmoretti@electionline.org. Job postings must be received by 5pm on Wednesday in order to appear in the Thursday newsletter. Listings will run for three weeks or till the deadline listed in the posting.

Civic Data Research Fellow, Center for Technology and Civic Life — “What’s on my ballot?” is the number one question that voters look for online – but the answer to that question is harder to find than you might think. With nearly 8,000 offices responsible for running elections in America, the basic information that voters need to participate in elections is often poorly formatted and hard to find – if it’s online at all. At the Center for Technology and Civic Life, we think all voters should be able to find this information online, and we need your help! In 2016, our ballot data reached between one-third and one-half of all voters in the country, and we expect 2018 to be even bigger. We’re looking for a set of 2018 Civic Data Fellows to help us standardize the nation’s ballot information, so that all Americans can find information about what will be on their ballot in November. Civic Data Fellows will work closely with our Research Associates and Director of Civic Data to collect and standardize information about candidates and referenda from across the country. If you love democracy, researching obscure facts, and turning chaos into order, this is the job for you! Salary: $48,000. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Data Analysis & Outreach Fellow, Center for Technology and Civic Life— CTCL has conducted extensive research on the demographics of power in the United States through its partnership with the Reflective Democracy Campaign. Our groundbreaking analyses of the race and gender of elected officials and candidates across the country has been featured in national news and has shaped the way we talk about representation in the US. We’re looking to add a full-time Fellow to help make our data even more useful, so that the information and insights it contains can better be used to make our government more modern and reflective. Working with the Director of Civic Data and our external partners, the Data Analysis & Outreach Fellow will focus on improving, analyzing, and growing the use of our Reflective Democracy dataset. Examples of responsibilities include: Data research & analysis, data visualization and reporting, and organizing and outreach. Salary: $50,000-$60,000. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Data Manager, The New York City Campaign Finance Board — the New York City Campaign Finance Board seeks a Data Manager to collect and maintain data related to voter participation, election administration, and campaign finance and serve as the agency’s Open Data Coordinator. This position will report to the Deputy Director of Public Affairs. Responsibilities include: Maintain and document data management policies and practices for Public Affairs; Serve as the agency’s Open Data Coordinator and ensure compliance with the NYC Open Data Law; Manage acquisition and collection of data both internally and from external sources; Evaluate federal, state, local, and community data sources to incorporate into internal data research; Oversee data entry with the Document Processing Unit and ensure quality assurance of all internally-collected voting data; Create visualizations and dashboards from campaign finance and voting data; Work with Public Affairs and agency staff to supply data for decision-making or project needs; Assist in developing an overall data strategy. Salary: $65,000-$75,000. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Data Quality Assurance Fellow, Center for Technology and Civic Life — CTCL’s Civic Data team creates and maintains nationwide datasets of candidate and elected officials, working with partners to ensure that everyone in America can answer basic questions about our democracy. Creating the datasets that power some of the most powerful civic information tools available is hard work. Consistently ensuring that these datasets are the best they can be is even harder. We’re looking for someone with a love of democracy (and a borderline-scary eye for detail) to help maintain and improve the civic information we and our partners provide to the public. Working with the Director of Civic Data, the Data Quality Assurance Fellow will work with our own data and with our partners to ensure the completeness and accuracy of the civic information available online. Examples of responsibilities include: Verifying civic information; sourcing political geographies; and implementing internal quality control systems. Salary: $50,000. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Operations Manager, Douglas County, Colorado— the Elections Operations Manager  plans and conducts all functions associated with the operations of the Elections Division of the Clerk and Recorder’s Office in collaboration with the Deputy of Elections, including: oversight of responsibilities within the elections office and Voter Service and Polling Centers, coaching and supervision of staff; creation and enforcement of policies, procedures, and state and federal statutes and regulations ; creation and execution of strategic and tactical plans for operating successful elections; coordination of election functions with entities participating in a County election or conducting their own election; managing election assets; and. Coordinates with and assists other Clerk & Recorder Divisions as needed. Salary: $5,266-$7,899/month. Deadline: June 24. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections and Voter Services Manager, Montana Secretary of State’s Office — this position serves as the Manager of the Elections and Voter Services Division and reports to the Elections and Voter Services Director for the Office of the Secretary of State.  This position is responsible for ensuring the integrity of elections, aligning resources with the strategic direction of the Elections and Voter Services Division, interpreting state election laws and ensuring implementation uniformly throughout the state, and interpreting, analyzing, drawing conclusions, identifying trends, and presenting voting data. This position supervises three positions within the Division and is responsible for all aspects of performance management. Salary: $75,000. Deadline: Open until filled: Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Embedded System Software Engineer, Clear Ballot — Clear Ballot is looking for a talented Software Engineer who wants to bring their technical skills to bear on a hugely consequential problem. The successful candidate will build and enhance full software stack of highly available applications using primarily Python that interface with front-end web applications implemented in JavaScript and HTML5.  The application software deploys on OEM based hardware, with optical scanner, battery backup, and full touchscreen UI, running a custom configured version of Linux OS. The ideal candidate should have strong technical skills, solid understanding of developing for embedded systems, a good working knowledge of the Linux architecture, and software integration with OEM hardware devices. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build and enhance a platform that is changing the elections industry. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Field Sales Director, Hart InterCivic — the Field Sales Director works primarily on the road and from a home office when he/she is not on business travel. The Field Sales Director is responsible for creating news sales with prospects and existing clients in a defined region. Today, this role is a single contributor and does not directly manage people.   This position will report to the VP of Sales. Application: For the complete job listing an to apply, click here.

Full Stack Principal Software Engineer, Clear Ballot— Clear Ballot is looking for an accomplished Principal Software Engineer who wants to bring their technical and leadership skills to bear on a hugely consequential problem: Bringing transparency to democratic elections. The successful candidate will have the ability to look at the bigger picture and deal with complex and competing requirements to design effective solutions. Extensive knowledge of and experience with large data structures and algorithms will be key. The backend implemented in Python and uses a SQL data base. The front end is implemented in JavaScript, Node.js and HTML5.  The ideal candidate should have strong technical and leadership skills and a good working knowledge of the latest concepts in security, performance, and resilience. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build and enhance a platform that is changing the elections industry. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Full Stack Software Developer, Clear Ballot— Clear Ballot is looking for a talented Software Engineer who wants to bring their technical skills to bear on a hugely consequential problem. The successful candidate will build and enhance enterprise-level, highly available applications using primarily Python and MySQL that interface with frontend web applications implemented in JavaScript, Node.js and HTML5.  The ideal candidate should have strong technical skills and a good working knowledge of the latest concepts in performance, security and resilience. One of the hallmarks of our system is its emphasis on new visualization techniques made possible by sophisticated data structures that enable high-performance in a multi-user environment. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build and enhance a platform that is changing the elections industry. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Full-Stack Software Engineer, Clear Ballot — Clear Ballot is looking for a talented Software Engineer who wants to bring their technical skills to bear on a hugely consequential problem – to modernize America’s voting systems and to bring transparency to democratic elections.  The successful candidate will build and enhance enterprise-level, highly available applications using primarily Python and MySQL that interface with frontend web applications implemented in JavaScript, Node.js and HTML5.  The ideal candidate should have strong technical skills and a good working knowledge of the latest concepts in performance, security and resilience. One of the hallmarks of our system is its emphasis on new visualization techniques made possible by sophisticated data structures that enable high-performance in a multi-user environment. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build and enhance a platform that is changing the elections industry. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Hardware Engineer (Toronto, ON) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a an experienced Hardware Engineer to join our team in Toronto, Ontario! This position will work in a fast paced engineering, design, development and technical support environment with many variables and challenges. This position will be accountable for provisioning of electronics and providing software and mechanical engineering support to new product development, manufacturing and field support teams. Salary: Negotiable base + bonus & benefits. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Python Developer, Clear Ballot — Clear Ballot seeks a talented python developer in the Boston area to assume responsibility for an existing suite of python scripts to create files for use with ClearVote(TM) digital voting system. Job responsibilities: Maintain and enhance existing python scripts that read PDF formatted ballot styles and produce the files needed by ClearVote (TM) digital voting system to tabulate said ballot; Run existing python scripts to generate marked test ballots for use in testing ClearVote(TM); Develop and execute test plans to guarantee ClearVote tabulates marked ballots correctly; Expand PDF parsing capabilities as new customer’s ballot styles are introduced; Leverage analytics you gather to improve performance through script and/or hardware changes; Must perform these duties within aggressive timelines that often require working outside of normal business hours. Application: For the complete listing and to apply, click here.

Research Associate, Center for Election Innovation & Research — the Research Associate will conduct original research and provide written quantitative and qualitative analyses. The Research Associate will work full-time in the Washington, DC Metro Area, usually in CEIR’s office, although sometimes working from home may be possible. Job Duties include: Conduct original research covering a variety of election-related issues pertinent to CEIR’s mission; Draft papers, blog posts, and other writings, to be published by CEIR and/or other outlets; Attend convenings, hearings, and other meetings; and Interact with election officials and other election experts. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Software Product Specialist (Chicago, IL) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a data-savvy and passionate Software Product Specialist to join our team in Chicago, IL! This position is responsible for the precise data entry and formatting of election information for our customers in order to style, proof, and finalize ballots which are utilized in elections. This position requires a high degree of accuracy and attention to detail as well as experience with Microsoft Excel including formulas and macros. Salary: Negotiable base + bonus & benefits. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

State Election Technology Associate, Clear Ballot— our growing team has an immediate need for a new member to manage testing, approval and certification campaigns of election technology in new states. This position works directly with State Government to test and approve voting systems. Certification and approval is key to success in the election systems domain. Diplomacy and empathy alongside professional and tactful communications are key contributors to smooth state certification campaigns of new election technology. All voting system components (ballot layout, in-person voting, absentee voting, results reporting and audit) and their associated documentation are certified by state agencies; evaluation is performed by demanding government laboratories.  Requirements vary across the States; and these requirements are found in statute, Rule, by written and oral tradition, and sometimes are ambiguous and even unwritten.  Attention to detail is paramount to success. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Systems Engineer, Clear Ballot — We are looking for a talented Systems Engineer who has both a technical and services/support background which enables them to quickly assess customer needs and offer value to Clear Ballot’s customers. The Systems Engineer will gain a deep understanding of how Clear Ballot’s products operate and their optimal configuration to build a streamlined installation process of the Clear Vote election system. The ideal candidate for this position can prioritize mission critical tasks and coordinate the implementation and expansion of our systems. They will be able to work directly with customers, display innovation, think conceptually and act tactically to build consensus around system installation and enhancement and meet deadlines. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Systems Manager (Chicago, IL) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a tech-savvy, customer focused Systems Manager to join our team in Chicago, IL! This position will be responsible for the readiness of Dominion’s voting systems to perform properly in the assigned jurisdictions which includes defining the functionality of the D-Suite system, monitoring the development of the system in accordance with the required functionality, and managing its testing and preparation for delivery to the market. Salary: Negotiable base + bonus & benefits. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Systems Specialist – Advanced Field Support (Toronto, ON) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking an experienced & passionate Systems Specialist – Advanced Field Support to join our team in Toronto, Ontario! This position provides highly skilled and technical support in the testing, implementing and triaging of election systems both pre and post deployment. This includes providing functionality requirements of the system, monitoring the development of the system in accordance with the required functionality, and participating in its testing and preparation for delivery to the market. Salary: Negotiable base + bonus & benefits. Deadline: Open until filled. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

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