electionline Weekly

August 23, 2018

August 23, 2018

In Focus This Week

I. In Focus This Week

Su voto es su voz
NALEO and AAJC team up on three “Guides to Language Access”

With less than three months until Election Day, voting rights groups are releasing new language assistance reports with hopes that election officials, policymakers, and community leaders will be ready to assist voters from different language backgrounds.

Asian Americans Advancing Justice | AAJC, Fair Elections Center and the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials (NALEO) Educational Fund collaborated on the three “Guides to Language Access”. 

In the United States, more than 62 million people speak a language other than English at home. Of this population, over 40 percent are limited-English proficient. Almost 15 percent of voting-age citizens speak a language other than English at home and of those, almost a third are limited-English proficient. 

Because large populations of voters speak another language at home, election officials and policymakers could do more to better ensure these Americans are able to vote. Community organizations also play an important role in helping to meet their communities’ language access needs.

Various sections of the Voting Rights Act (VRA) prohibit voting practices and procedures that discriminate against those who speak another language in a minority group and protect the right to assistance for those who need it because of blindness, disability or inability to read or write.

Some jurisdictions, based on population and literacy requirements, must provide live voting assistance and any election-related information they make available in English in the covered languages, and officials may always go beyond legal minimum requirements to offer better service to their voters. When properly implemented and effectively provided, language assistance can increase voter participation. 

The “Guides to Language Access” clarify these requirements and opportunities to provide assistance and background on the issue, and outline best practices beyond the minimum requirements of the federal law and concrete examples for three audiences: election officials, policymakers, and community leaders. Each audience plays a crucial role in reaching and helping language minority communities participate in our elections. 

“Every eligible citizen, regardless of their language background, should have access to the materials they need to understand the voting process so they can make their voice heard,” said Michelle Kanter Cohen, Counsel at Fair Elections Center. “This series of reports offers real tools, solutions and examples for community leaders, policymakers, and election officials to improve the voter experience for citizens who face language barriers. We look forward to using these tools to engage with a variety of different audiences around this important issue.” 

According to NALEO, Latino voters, a significant number of whom are more fluent in Spanish than English, account for 12 percent of the nation’s electorate, and their numbers are rapidly growing.

“The present and future health of our democratic system depends upon our ability to engage Latinos and all Americans, regardless of their language background, to ensure that they are able to vote,” stated Erin Hustings, NALEO Educational Fund legislative counsel. “These guidelines provide quality language assistance, which serves this critical interest and professionalizes election administration in our nation, guaranteeing that our voting process is worthy of our status as the world’s leading democracy.” 

Terry Ao Minnis, director of census and voting rights at Asian Americans Advancing Justice | AAJC pointed out that with Asian American being the fastest growing population with a majority speaking a language other than English at home, it’s important they have access to materials that help them exercise their right to vote.

“Voting is a right of all citizens, not a ‘privilege’ earned by speaking English – this series of reports helps to bridge the language access divide, allowing limited-English proficient voters to fully participate in our democracy,” Minnis said.  

The reports for each audience and a summary of those reports can be found here. 

(The National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials (NALEO) Educational Fund is a grantee of the Democracy Fund).

Federal-State Updates

II. Federal-State Updates

On ABC’s “This Week” National Security Advisor John Bolton said that efforts by Russia, China, Iran and North Korea to meddle with U.S. elections are a “sufficient national security concern.” “I can say definitively that it’s a sufficient national security concern about Chinese meddling, Iranian meddling and North Korean meddling that we’re taking steps to try and prevent it,” Bolton said

According to multiple reports, the Secure Elections Act is on thin ice. The Senate Rules Committee markup scheduled for August 22 was postponed with committee staff finding out about the postponement only 90 minutes before the hearing was set to begin.

A committee staffer told FCW on background that provisions of the bill have generated opposition from some state officials including the Vermont Secretary of State, who is currently president of the National Association of Secretaries of State. The staffer said that “additional majority support” – more Republican votes – will be needed to advance a “truly bipartisan bill.” The staffer said a Senators-only briefing on election security could help convince lawmakers on a united course of action.

Also on Wednesday, according to The Hill, Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kristjen Nielsen told a group of reporters touring DHS’ National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center that she wants “all state and local election officials to make certain that by the 2020 presidential election, every American votes on a verifiable and a auditable ballot.”

Primary Updates

III. Primary Updates

Alaska: Although Anchorage conducted a successful vote-by-mail municipal election earlier this year, it was back to community-based polling places for the statewide primary this week, even in Anchorage. Overall it was a smooth affair although some voters in Anchorage Hillside were forced to vote by flashlight due to power outage. With more than 19,000 ballots — provisional, absentee by mail/fax/online delivery, early voting, etc.— that won’t be counted on election night the Division of Elections laid out their timeline and process for counting the ballots. Some ballots in rural precincts had to be hand counted which lead to a delay in reporting.

Massachusetts: Officials and candidates in towns that hand-count ballots are at odds with the secretary of state’s office because the ballots do not provide room for write-ins. One candidate has asked the state to reprint the ballots. The Greenfield Recorder reports that the secretary of state’s office will not reprint the ballots, but that it will provide materials to be used at the polls to explain how to vote for a write-in candidate.

Missouri: Secretary of State Jay Ashcroft (R) announced this week that his office would be investigating why a polling place in O’Fallon opened 90 minutes and whether or not that late opening may have changed the results of the August 7 primary. According to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, races are close enough in both the Republican and Democratic primaries for the House District 102 seat that any candidate could request a recount. So far, the secretary of state’s office has received conflict reports from the county as to why the polling place opened late.

Washington: We didn’t have too much to report out of Washington’s all vote-by-mail primary the week of August 7, but we do have some interesting news this week. It turns out that ballots had to sit in four Ferry County drop boxes for more than week because election officials did not have the personnel and resources to collect them. According to the Spokesman-Review, state law requires that drop box ballots must be collected by a team of two people. But when Auditor Dianna Galvan had a family emergency while Elections Administrator Liz Stinson was at a training, there was no one able to pick up the 65-or-so ballots. The ballots were eventually picked up and counted.

Wyoming: There were relatively few problems throughout the state on primary day. Early voting turnout was high in some counties, but not record-breaking. According to county clerks, 90 percent of the absentee ballots sent out were returned. Sheridan County Clerk Eda Schunk Thompson did report a ballot scanning problem when polls opened, but nothing that affected voters. In Albany County, where election results were delayed, Clerk Jackie Gonzales told the Laramie Boomerang that thousands of voters switching parties led to a shortage of GOP ballots which lead to the use of copied ballots which then had to be counted by hand. Poll workers in Natrona County reported “steady” voting and there were no problems as the county’s vote centers. The county will need to conduct recounts in at least two close races. In the race for secretary of state, Democrat James Byrd will face incumbent Republican Edward Buchanan. Both men were unopposed in their primaries.

Election News This Week

IV. Election News This Week

The state of Indiana is spending $500,000 to remind people to register to vote for November and to assure the public that the state’s voting system is secure. Secretary of State Connie Lawson’s office is partnering with an Indianapolis marketing firm to create the ad campaign that will run on TV, radio and in print. “In Indiana, the security of our voting system is of the utmost importance. This public awareness campaign demonstrates to voters that proper precautions are in place to secure their vote,” Lawson said in the campaign announcement. “We take great care to prepare our election administrators for each cycle, and in partnership with counties, other states, and the federal government we are developing new answers to security concerns and election policy.” In one of the radio ads released, the state’s election system is equated to a human being and if so, it would be the “healthiest 200-year-old you’ll ever find.”

Harris County, Texas recently placed more than 1,700 voters on a suspension list after officials for the county’s Republican party challenged 4,000 voter registration. According to the Houston Chronicle, The suspensions came to light after Bennett’s office mailed letters to the voters whose registrations were challenged, asking them to confirm their addresses. “They were following procedure they believed was the correct procedure, but after they consulted with us, they realized that the correct procedure was to wait 30 days,” Assistant County Attorney Douglas Ray told the paper. Harris County Tax Assessor-Collector Ann HarrisBennett blamed the mistake on a software glitch. She said her office discovered the error after three or four days, and immediately fixed the 1,735 suspended registrations.

“If the mountain won’t come to Muhammad, then Muhammad must go to the mountain.” Or at least that was the plan in Morgan County, Georgia where the rural county became the first to attempt to move to paper ballots without waiting on the state to do so. According to CBS46, the county board of elections considered a three-part resolution that would have move the county away from DRE machines and instead opting paper ballots and optical scans. The vote was close with the BOE chairman casting the deciding vote against citing that the county could not overstep state law.

The Baker Center for Leadership and Governance recently awarded grant funding to Ben Mindes, a graduate student at Georgetown University’s McCourt School of Public Policy to pilot the first nonpartisan, sample-based election observation effort in the U.S. Observe D.C. will deploy stationary observers to a random sample of the 143 polling places in the District, which allows the group to extrapolate findings on the process to the entire District. “We will be looking at procedural aspects of electoral administration, as well as accessibility for people with disabilities,” Mindes said. Prior to enrolling at Georgetown, Mindes supported several citizen groups around the world to conduct such observations as a member of the National Democratic Institute’s Elections team. “This effort would be the first time the sample-based methodology would be applied to an election observation effort in the U.S.” We’re eager to hear from Mindes after November to see what he finds, but in the mean time, if you live in the D.C.-area and are interested in volunteering, you can sign up via Observe D.C.’s Facebook page.

Personnel News: Ron Massulo is the new Trumbull County, Ohio board of elections director. Stanley Grot has withdrawn from the Michigan secretary of state’s race. Dennis Boyles is retiring as the Pender County, North Carolina elections director. Willie Green has resigned as the Floyd County, Georgia elections supervisor.

Legislative Updates

V. Legislative Updates

Illinois: Gov. Bill Ruaner (R) has vetoed a bill that would have required corrections officials to help those incarcerated in jails and prisons understand their voting rights. The bill would have required election and corrections officials to offer ballots to people being detained in jail prior to their trials who want to vote. It would have also required corrections officials to provide voter registration forms to people being released from jail and information about voting rights to those leaving prison. According to the Huffington Post, in his veto, Rauner didn’t object to helping people get access to ballots during pretrial detention, but specifically took issue with the requirement that officials provide voter registration forms to people leaving jail and voting rights information to those leaving prison. He said he’d support the bill if lawmakers eliminated those elements of it.

Virginia: In a 3-6 vote, the Chesapeake City council has voted down a proposal that would have moved the city’s elections from May to November.

Legal Updates

VI. Legal Updates

Arizona: The American Civil Liberties Union has sued the secretary of state’s office alleging that the state does not promptly update voters’ addresses. According to the suit, procedures set up by Secretary of State Michele Reagan require voters to affirmatively ask the state Department of Transportation to update their new address, which is plaintiffs claim is in violate of federal law. State Elections Director Eric Spencer told the Arizona Capitol Times that the state is moving in that direction.

Florida: Citing the influx of voters from Puerto Rico following Hurricane Maria, Demos has filed a lawsuit claiming that at least 32 additional Florida counties should be providing voting materials in English and in Spanish.

Hawaii: A complaint has been filed with the Hawaii Supreme Court alleging that voter fraud, coercion and intimidation by State Rep. Romy Cachola helped Cachola win the Aug. 11 primary by just 51 votes. According to Honolulu Civil Beat, the complaint is premised on the surge of absentee mail-in ballots that secured Cachola the win. Hawaii elections chief Scott Nago is also named in the suit.

Kentucky: In a legal opinion issued las week, the commonwealth’s attorney general said that poll workers may provide voters with a list of certified write-in candidates. According to the Lexington Herald-Leader, the state law that prohibits electioneering at the polls does not prohibit distributing a list of write-in candidates if a voter requests instructions on how to cast a write-in vote, the opinion said in response to a question by Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes.

Tennessee: The Rogersville Board of Mayor and Alderman has decline to reimburse the Hawkins County election commission for $14,723 in legal fees. The town sued the commission earlier this year over the commission’s decision to consolidate voting precincts.

Tech Thursday

VII. Tech Thursday

Cybersecurity: According to CNN, 36 states have installed cyber-intrusion systems supplied by the Department of Homeland Security. Rather than block cyber threats outright, the Albert system alerts officials about potentially questionable activity to be investigated by experts. In those states, 74 sensors in 38 counties have been installed so far. DHS and Center for Internet Security officials aren’t saying why the 14 remaining states aren’t using Albert, and they won’t name the states.

Cybersecurity: CyberScoop has a handy guide for state and local elections officials that details all the technology companies that are offering assistance, a lot of it for free, to officials this election season.

California: Los Angeles County’s new open-source voting system, Voting Solutions For All People (VSAP) Tally Version 1.0 was certified by the secretary of state’s office this week. “With security on the minds of elections officials and the public, open-source technology has the potential to further modernize election administration, security and transparency,” Secretary of State Alex Padilla said. “Los Angeles County’s VSAP vote tally system is now California’s first certified election system to use open-source technology. This publicly-owned technology represents a significant step in the future of elections in California and across the country.”

Florida: With the Sunshine State’s primary less than a week away, Pinellas County Supervisor of Elections Deborah Clark has announced a new, enhanced website feature to showcase election night results. The module, called Election Night Reporting (ENR), shows both a numeric and graphical view of county results. Users can drill down on information through maps that illustrate the percentage of precincts reporting, voter turnout, and results by precinct. Another view shows a breakdown of votes cast for a candidate by contest and totals by vote type.   

Tennessee: Queer the Vote 2018: Hamilton County is a ride-share app created by the Chattanooga Queer Community Forum to help members of the LGBTQ community get to the polls. During the recent primary, which was a test run, the app, and its rainbow-colored SUV picked up about half a dozen voters and took them to the polls.

Opinions This Week

VIII. Opinions This Week

National Opinions: Election security, II, III | Voting rights | Election system, II | Voter fraud

Arizona: English-only ballots

California: San Diego County

Delaware: Election security | Voting system

Florida: Election security | Write-in loophole

Georgia: Randolph County | Voter suppression | Secretary of state

Indiana: Voter access

Kentucky: Ex-felon voting rights

Louisiana: Secretary of state race

Massachusetts: Secretary of state race, II, III

Michigan: Oakland County

Missouri: Voter access, II

Montana: Voter purges

Nebraska: Election security | Vote-by-mail

New Hampshire: Election system

New Jersey: Election security

New Mexico: Election security | Automatic voter registration

North Carolina: Voter ID | Young voters

Ohio: Poll workers | Voter fraud

Pennsylvania: Poll workers

Wisconsin: Poll workers

Upcoming Events

IX. Upcoming Events

CTCL Online Series: Cybersecurity for Election Officials — Data breaches, ransomware, and denial-of-service attacks are becoming regular headlines in America, but election officials are uniquely positioned on the front lines to help safeguard our democracy while ensuring that each vote counts. Due to the strong response to our July series, we’re offering these cybersecurity courses again at the end of August. Join election officials from around the country in our online series that will empower your election office to manage cyber threats and communicate with the public about cybersecurity. When: Aug. 27-29. Where: Online.

Election Center 34th Annual National Conference — Attendees will be inspired and energized as we head into the final stretch of the mid-term election year. We will share substantive elections issues including crucial critical infrastructure information, new updates from the investing in elections project, elections in review, information on new voting systems, the vendor exhibit area where you can learn about new and innovative voting system support and much more! We will honor and celebrate the winners of the Election Center’s acclaimed Professional Practices Papers’ Program. IT is also a platform in which election officials can share their successful practices. Award Winners will be announced at a session on Monday afternoon and you will take home all the best practices submitted on your own DVD. When: Aug. 27-28. Where: New Orleans.

National Election Security Summit — National, state and local election authorities will join officials from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Election Assistance Commission, Elections Infrastructure — Information Sharing and Analysis Center, security professionals, election experts, and other industry leaders to learn and share tangible best practices. These security discussions will provide attendees useable steps to mitigate threats and vulnerabilities as election authorities gear up for the 2018 mid-term elections. This is an event designed for election officials and is not open to the public and space is limited. When: September 10-11. Where: St. Louis, Missouri.

Job Postings This Week

X. Job Postings This Week
electionlineWeekly publishes election administration job postings each week as a free service to our readers. To have your job listed in the newsletter, please send a copy of the job description, including a web link to mmoretti@electionline.org. Job postings must be received by 5pm on Wednesday in order to appear in the Thursday newsletter. Listings will run for three weeks or till the deadline listed in the posting.

Certification Manager (Denver, CO) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Certification Manager to join our team in Denver, CO! This position is a cross -functional leader playing a key role in managing certification efforts for Dominion Voting products. In this role, you will act as a representative of the company with State and Federal certification officials, test labs, and other key internal and external stakeholders throughout the certification process. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Customer Relations Manager (Phoenix, AZ) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Customer Relations Manager to join our team in Phoenix, AZ! This position will be responsible for effectively and proactively managing the day-to-day relationship, administration and technical/product support of one or more assigned customer accounts. Additionally, the CRM will serve as project manager for specialized projects such as pre- and postelection day support, new product implementations, and/or product upgrades/updates. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Cybersecurity Program Manager, National Association of Secretaries of State — cybersecurity Program Manager works directly under the supervision of the Executive Director. General job description includes: Serve as a liaison between the NASS members, federal agencies (US Department of Homeland Security, US Election Assistance Commission, et al.) and Congress on all cybersecurity related issues, policy, legislation, and practices. Staff new NASS Cybersecurity Committee. Maintain current, accurate contact lists for all Secretary of State cyber staff, federal agencies and congressional offices. Monitor and participate in cybersecurity related forums (both public and private sector) in order to provide information and resources to NASS members. Monitor state cybersecurity programs and practices to assist communications director, research director and executive director in developing fact sheets, talking points and white papers. Organize cybersecurity workshops at NASS conferences and semi-annual Tech Talk Forums. Provide assistance with speaker selection for association meetings. Develop and maintain relationships with cybersecurity stakeholders to include private sector, academics, non-profits and advocacy organizations. Assist Executive Director and Director of Research with tracking and analyzing federal, state and congressional activity related to the work of NASS members. Provide IT technical support for NASS office. This is a new position, thus additional duties will be added as position and related work is more established. Application: Please send resume, salary requirements and references to reynolds@sso.org.

Election Security Lead, Wisconsin Elections Commission — the Wisconsin Elections Commission (WEC) develops and maintains several significant IT applications to assist in the administration of Wisconsin elections, including the statewide voter registration system known as WisVote, the Canvass Reporting System, and electronic poll book software known as Badger Book, as well as public websites such as MyVote Wisconsin and BADGER Voters.  Protecting the security of these applications is crucial to ensuring accurate elections and maintaining public confidence in the integrity of Wisconsin elections. This position serves as the point person for developing and implementing the agency’s overall elections security plan.  It is responsible for ensuring the implementation of cyber security best practices in the Commission’s technical applications including WisVote.  This position will research and maintain the agency’s knowledge base regarding cybersecurity infrastructure, resources and practice.  This position will also liaise with other State agencies and Federal entities regarding potential cyber threats against the Commission’s applications. Salary: $51,398-$80,621. Deadline: Open until filled. Application. For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Supervisor, Pinal County, Arizona— performs professional and administrative work in planning, organizing and directing strategic and daily goals and objectives, operations and activities of the Elections Department. Work is performed under the general administrative direction of the Elections Director. The employee is expected to exercise initiative, independent judgment and discretion. Salary: $49,647-$56,473. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Embedded System Software Engineer, Clear Ballot — Clear Ballot is looking for a talented Software Engineer who wants to bring their technical skills to bear on a hugely consequential problem. The successful candidate will build and enhance full software stack of highly available applications using primarily Python that interface with front-end web applications implemented in JavaScript and HTML5.  The application software deploys on OEM based hardware, with optical scanner, battery backup, and full touchscreen UI, running a custom configured version of Linux OS. The ideal candidate should have strong technical skills, solid understanding of developing for embedded systems, a good working knowledge of the Linux architecture, and software integration with OEM hardware devices. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build and enhance a platform that is changing the elections industry. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Field Sales Director, Hart InterCivic — the Field Sales Director works primarily on the road and from a home office when he/she is not on business travel. The Field Sales Director is responsible for creating news sales with prospects and existing clients in a defined region. Today, this role is a single contributor and does not directly manage people.   This position will report to the VP of Sales. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Full Stack Principal Software Engineer, Clear Ballot— Clear Ballot is looking for an accomplished Principal Software Engineer who wants to bring their technical and leadership skills to bear on a hugely consequential problem: Bringing transparency to democratic elections. The successful candidate will have the ability to look at the bigger picture and deal with complex and competing requirements to design effective solutions. Extensive knowledge of and experience with large data structures and algorithms will be key. The backend implemented in Python and uses a SQL data base. The front end is implemented in JavaScript, Node.js and HTML5.  The ideal candidate should have strong technical and leadership skills and a good working knowledge of the latest concepts in security, performance, and resilience. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build and enhance a platform that is changing the elections industry. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Full Stack Software Developer, Clear Ballot— Clear Ballot is looking for a talented Software Engineer who wants to bring their technical skills to bear on a hugely consequential problem. The successful candidate will build and enhance enterprise-level, highly available applications using primarily Python and MySQL that interface with frontend web applications implemented in JavaScript, Node.js and HTML5.  The ideal candidate should have strong technical skills and a good working knowledge of the latest concepts in performance, security and resilience. One of the hallmarks of our system is its emphasis on new visualization techniques made possible by sophisticated data structures that enable high-performance in a multi-user environment. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build and enhance a platform that is changing the elections industry. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Full-Stack Software Engineer, Clear Ballot — Clear Ballot is looking for a talented Software Engineer who wants to bring their technical skills to bear on a hugely consequential problem – to modernize America’s voting systems and to bring transparency to democratic elections.  The successful candidate will build and enhance enterprise-level, highly available applications using primarily Python and MySQL that interface with frontend web applications implemented in JavaScript, Node.js and HTML5.  The ideal candidate should have strong technical skills and a good working knowledge of the latest concepts in performance, security and resilience. One of the hallmarks of our system is its emphasis on new visualization techniques made possible by sophisticated data structures that enable high-performance in a multi-user environment. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build and enhance a platform that is changing the elections industry. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Inside Sales Representative, Runbeck — to support our desired growth and market expansion, we continue to hire outstanding talent in multiple departments. We are looking for highly motivated, dedicated and talented individuals who will be able to contribute significantly to the success of the company while receiving great opportunities for professional growth and financial benefits. Responsibilities include: Contact potential or existing customers to inform them about a product or service; ability to present solution and its value to a prospect over the phone; answer questions about products or the company; ask questions to understand customer requirements and close sales; enter and update customer information in the database; keep records of calls and sale and note useful information in the CRM; process orders in an accurate manner; and go the “extra mile” to meet sales quota and facilitate future sales. Application: In order to apply, please send a resume to Tammy White: twhite@runbeck.net.

Project Manager (San Leandro, CA or Sacramento, CA) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking an experienced Project Manager to join our team in either San Leandro, CA or Sacramento, CA! This position will be responsible for the effective technical project management of assigned projects which includes but not limited to, business, functional, and risk analysis as well as implementation of new processes, equipment and systems. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Python Developer, Clear Ballot — Clear Ballot seeks a talented python developer in the Boston area to assume responsibility for an existing suite of python scripts to create files for use with ClearVote(TM) digital voting system. Job responsibilities: Maintain and enhance existing python scripts that read PDF formatted ballot styles and produce the files needed by ClearVote (TM) digital voting system to tabulate said ballot; Run existing python scripts to generate marked test ballots for use in testing ClearVote(TM); Develop and execute test plans to guarantee ClearVote tabulates marked ballots correctly; Expand PDF parsing capabilities as new customer’s ballot styles are introduced; Leverage analytics you gather to improve performance through script and/or hardware changes; Must perform these duties within aggressive timelines that often require working outside of normal business hours. Application: For the complete listing and to apply, click here.

Senior Applications and System Coordinator, Douglas County, Colorado— the Senior Applications and Systems Coordinator acts as an expert member of the Clerk and Recorder’s Office across all Divisions and is responsible for the overall coordination, maintenance, and technical support of equipment, systems, applications, and platforms to ensure compatibility and integration with business operations and enterprise strategies. In coordination with the Information Technology (IT) Project Management Office (PMO), this role will assist in defining project scope, requirements, timeline, and milestones including coordination of resources, purchasing, equipment, logistics, systems analysis, software application support, and vendor management. In addition, this role will partner with the IT Application Services Team to determine and implement the best fit solution based on statutory requirements, business value, technical strategy, cost, etc. The Senior Applications and Systems Coordinator is dedicated to elections technology and system support during election cycles; reports to and is a primary redundancy for the Elections Logistics and Technology Supervisor to ensure continuity of operations. Chief Deputy directs work and provides consultative supervision for work performed outside of Elections Division. Salary: $4583-$5729 monthly. Deadline: August 24. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Senior Level Software Developer, BPro — We are a well-established small business that has been developing requirements and producing software for the needs of state governments since 1985 and continue to maintain and upgrade many of those systems. We have offices in Pierre, South Dakota, Fargo, North Dakota, Minnesota & Virginia. We’re currently looking for an energetic and intelligent .Net Developer to join our growing team. Our ideal candidate is one who loves to learn, enjoys working as a team, and who can multitask and meet deadlines. Skills required: .NET, VB, VBA, ASP, SQL, HTML, and JavaScript. A four-year college degree is the minimum educational requirement. All applicants must have excellent written and verbal communications skills. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Senior Software Developer, Runbeck— Runbeck Election Services is looking for full stack enthusiasts who are comfortable tackling end-to-end and enjoy building products that solve big problems and delight customers. We’re a collaborative team who knows how to get things done (Lone Rangers need not apply). We believe that small teams focused on shipping software move the fastest and make the most impact. The ideal candidate for this position has extensive back end skills (C#, MVC, ASP.Net, SQL Server) paired with solid web and desktop skills (IIS, JavaScript, HTML 5, CSS, jQuery, WPF, Win Forms). Must have a solid grasp of our basic toolset (Jira, Visual Studio). Willing to learn new plug-ins and IDE enhancements in order to boost your productivity and are excited to introduce us to new tooling experiences that have worked for you in the past. You bring discipline and care about implementation practices. You are familiar with Agile/Scrum processes, practice common design patterns, embrace clean coding principles, and employ many other techniques in an effort to bring a high level of software craftsmanship to your finished product. Application: In order to apply, please send a resume to Tammy White: twhite@runbeck.net.

Software Developer II (Toronto, ON) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking an experienced Software Developer to join our team in Toronto! This position will be responsible for providing high-level technical expertise to the design, development, coding, testing and debugging of new software products and/or significant enhancements to existing software products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Software Product Specialist II (Denver, CO) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Software Product Specialist II to join our team in Denver, Colorado! This position will be responsible for delivering a wide variety of technical and non-technical customer support services related to the implementation, operation, repair, maintenance and upgrades of Dominion Voting Systems technology products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Software Product Specialist II (Reno, NV) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Software Product Specialist II to join our team in Reno, NV! This position will be responsible for delivering a wide variety of technical and non-technical customer support services related to the implementation, operation, repair, maintenance and upgrades of Dominion Voting Systems technology products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Software Product Specialist II (Phoenix, AZ) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Software Product Specialist II to join our team in Phoenix, AZ! This position will be responsible for delivering a wide variety of technical and non-technical customer support services related to the implementation, operation, repair, maintenance and upgrades of Dominion Voting Systems technology products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Software Product Specialist II (San Leandro, CA) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Software Product Specialist II to join our team in San Leandro, CA! This position will be responsible for delivering a wide variety of technical and non-technical customer support services related to the implementation, operation, repair, maintenance and upgrades of Dominion Voting Systems technology products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Systems Engineer, Clear Ballot — We are looking for a talented Systems Engineer who has both a technical and services/support background which enables them to quickly assess customer needs and offer value to Clear Ballot’s customers. The Systems Engineer will gain a deep understanding of how Clear Ballot’s products operate and their optimal configuration to build a streamlined installation process of the Clear Vote election system. The ideal candidate for this position can prioritize mission critical tasks and coordinate the implementation and expansion of our systems. They will be able to work directly with customers, display innovation, think conceptually and act tactically to build consensus around system installation and enhancement and meet deadlines. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Marketplace

XI. Marketplace
electionline provides no guarantees as to the quality of the items being sold and the accuracy of the information provided about the sale items in the Marketplace. Ads are provided directly by sellers and are not verified by electionline. If you have an ad for Marketplace, please email it to: mmoretti@electionline.org

Voting Booths

votingbooth copyEach aluminum briefcase contains the following: aluminum legs, privacy shield, writing base, light assembly. All units are in great shape dimensions are 22”x 18”x 3“. MFG: ESL. Election supplies Limited, Napa California. Quantity: 400 Price per unit is $50. Contact Greg Larson 408.569.1004

 

< >
In Focus This Week
Browse by year:
Browse by week: < >