electionline Weekly

August 30, 2018

August 30, 2018

In Focus This Week

News Analysis: Class is in session
From coursework to security audits colleges are electing to help

This weekend marks the unofficial end of summer (sob) and co-eds across the country are headed back to ivy-covered campuses (if they aren’t already there) for another academic year.

While places like Harvard, the University of Minnesota and the University of Connecticut have been working with state and local elections officials for a while now, a new crop of elections-related programs are popping up at campuses across the country.

This is just a snapshot of some of the partnerships and programs we’ve seen pop up over the summer. If you know about one that we missed, let us know.

Earlier this summer, Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted announced a collaboration between the secretary of state’s office and Ohio’s community colleges.

“To maintain the integrity of our elections, we must constantly be working at both the state and local levels to innovate and improve our elections security measures,” Secretary Husted said. “While this can sometimes be a daunting task, Ohio’s two-year colleges are well-positioned and have the expertise to help us achieve these goals.”

Counties will be able to spend some of their HAVA 2018 funds to pay local community colleges help guide and assist them in complying with cybersecurity requirements.

“Federal entities like the National Security Agency (NSA) and the DHS are realizing the many ways two-year colleges can assist in reducing cyber vulnerability and enhancing data security,” said Jack Hershey, President and CEO of the Ohio Association of Community Colleges. “Several of Ohio’s community colleges have already stepped up to the plate to take active roles in this effort.”

The Clark County board of elections and Clark State Community College were one of the first to announce a partnership.

“We will assist them with a cybersecurity audit of their equipment, software and their election equipment to ensure proper security standards,” Clark State Cybersecurity Professor Dan Heighton told the Springfield News-Sun. “We are auditing their currently existing equipment to make sure they meet industry standards.”

In Indiana, Ball State University has partnered with the secretary of state’s office to provide training to elections officials in security procedures. The Certificate Program in Election Administration, Technology and Security will welcome its first 21 students this fall. The program will welcome new students every six months and is open to county clerks, election officials and those who want to do those jobs in the future.

“Today’s election official really needs to be an information technology specialist, unlike in the days without electronic equipment,” program co-director Bryan Byers told WFYI.

Hendricks County Elections Clerk Tammy Dooley will be part of the inaugural class at Ball State.

“It is an honor to be chosen to participate in the CEATS program,” Dooley told the Hendricks County Flyer. “This program will help me to be more proficient in a number of areas, for example, election and procedural law, personnel training and management, and cybersecurity just to name a few. This program is the first in the state that meets such a diverse need to aid election administrators in adapting to an ever-changing election environment to better serve the voters of our community.”

The secretary of state’s office is providing grants of up to $2,500 to attend the courses.

Earlier this month, the University of Chicago’s Harris School of Public Policy announced the creation of the new Cyber Policy Initiative (CPI). According to the university, the academic initiative will advance the emerging field of cyber policy and examine the intersection of national security, politics and technology.

CPI’s first collaboration was at DEF CON’s Voting Village where they provided free cybersecurity training to state and local elections officials.

Teaching the next generation

While many of the partnerships mentioned are programs where colleges and universities work directly with state and local elections officials, there are also a few programs out there teaching the next generation a thing or two about elections and election administration.

The University of Michigan offers a course to students called Security Digital Democracy. According to the write up of the course, taught by Associate Professor J. Alex Halderman, “…[i]n this course, you’ll learn what every citizen should know about the security risks–and future potential — of electronic voting and Internet voting. We’ll take a look at the past, present, and future of election technologies and explore the various spaces intersected by voting, including computer security, human factors, public policy, and more.

And it’s not just all election security and training. Florida State University is offering a course that covers the state’s ongoing legal battle over felons’ voting rights. According to WJCT, the class of about 20 students is open to graduate and undergrad students. It brings in students from the Colleges of Law, Social Work, and Social Sciences and Public Policy.

Mark Schlakman, senior program director of the FSU Law School’s Center for Advancement of Human Rights told the local television station that the idea of the class was to have students, whose fields of study are related to the issue, discuss it as the legal battle unfolds.

The class also relies on guest speakers who are familiar with the judicial system and voting rights. During one class, Leon County Sheriff Walk McNeil discussed the impacts of recidivism.

“One of the things that, as I talked to those persons who were coming back, is that, there is no hope,” McNeil said. “When you take hope away from a person, and you say, ‘You are forever not a citizen of your community, because you don’t have the fundamental right of every citizen.’”

Federal-State Updates

According to several published reports, it was at the behest of the Administration that the Secure Elections Act was held up. According to Yahoo News, White House spokeswoman Lindsay Walters said, “We cannot support legislation with inappropriate mandates or that moves power or funding from the states to Washington for the planning and operation of elections,” she added. However, the White House gave no specifics on what parts of the bill it objected to.

Officials from the Department of Homeland Security, the FBI, Microsoft and Facebook held a call with state elections officials last week to brief them on the latest threats to voting systems.

“With the 2018 midterms just around the corner everyone in the election and cybersecurity community must remain vigilant,” Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos, who leads the National Association of Secretaries of State, said in a DHS press release. “It is clear that Secretaries of State, state election officials, federal agencies and private sector partners are working diligently together to defend against foreign threats in order to protect our democracy.”

Sen. Ron Wyden’s (D-Oregon) bill that would require all states to provide paper ballots/backups picked up two key endorsements this week. Sens. Bernie Sanders (I-Vermont) and Kamala Harris (D-California) have both signed on as co-sponsors of the Protecting American Votes and Elections (PAVE) Act.

Primary Updates

Alaska: State elections officials are investigating irregularities with absentee ballots in one Anchorage House race. Included in the questionable ballots are seven absentees requested in the names of dead people. According to Alaska Public Radio, officials first noticed the irregularities before the August 21 primary and their review of the ballots in that has continued. In addition to ballots for dead voters, two ballots were requested and cast although the voters said that they did not request, nor cast the ballots. “The integrity of our elections is vital to our democracy,” Josie Bahnke, the state elections director, said in the statement to APM. “The division will continue to look into this matter throughout the week and remove any ballots that we determine should not be counted.”

Arizona: There may be 15 counties in Arizona, but most of the news from primary day 2018 came from one—Maricopa. As of 6 a.m. Tuesday when polls were scheduled to open, 62 sites were not operational. All sites were eventually up and running by 11 a.m. The secretary of state’s office had sought to keep polling sites open later than the 7 p.m. close, but the county’s board of supervisors denied the request. Maricopa County Recorder Adrian Fontes placed the blame squarely at the feet of Insight Enterprises, a Tempe-based contractor that had been hired to set up voter check-in equipment who Fontes claimed did not send enough technicians to set up. According to The Arizona Republic, Fontes and the company are odd overs the number. Fontes claimed the company was hired to send 103 technicians, the company claims it was contracted for 83 for set up. A document The Arizona Republic obtained from the county Wednesday reveals some of the problems could have stemmed partly from a misunderstanding between the Maricopa County Recorder’s Office and the contractor it hired to set up electronic voting systems at the polls. The county’s board of supervisors chairman has ordered an audit of the election to find what exactly went wrong. Although election day is over, that doesn’t mean the election is over and Pima County still has about 19,000 mail-in ballots at the recorder’s office awaiting verification. In the race for secretary of state, Republican incumbent Michele Reagan was defeated by businessman Steve Gaynor who will face Democrat Katie Hobbs in the general.

Florida: Although it was a rainy day in parts of the Sunshine State, that didn’t stop voters from turning out in large numbers and while there were minor problems reported at a small number of polling locations, the large turnout did not lead to long lines and frustration. In Duval County, ballots were wider than what the scanning machine would accept. The problem affected about 1,700 ballots. One voter in Palm Beach County was originally turned away because he was a no party voter, even though he should have been allowed to vote for judicial races. He was eventually able to vote. After a snafu about her address, one Lee County woman was unable to vote. One Leon County voter was unable to vote because they were mistakenly removed from the voter rolls. In Volusia County, a ballot mix-up in Daytona Beach mean that 10 voters who live within Zone 1 were unable to vote in the city commissioner’s race. And finally, in Bay County, one Florida Man showed up at his Panama City polling place with his emotional support goat in tow to cast his ballot. According to the News Herald, the goat remained outside while the resident voted. We are very, very sad to report that there seem to be no photos of the goat at the polling place.

Guam: Residents of the island territory of Guam went to the polls for their primary on Saturday and Guam Election Commission Executive Director Maria Pangelinan said although there were some minor problems, like precinct officials not reading the instruction cards to voters and a curbside voter who had to wait to vote, overall things went well. There were two formal complaints filed with the GEC though, one about electioneering and other regarding a provisional ballot. Pangelinan said both issues would be addressed.

Kansas: ES&S and Johnson County officials are blaming faulty software code for the delayed reporting of results during the August 7 primary. “The slow reporting of results was unacceptable and we apologize,” Tom Burt, president and CEO of Election Systems & Software, said in a statement Monday. “We know the election office and other Johnson County government leaders put their faith in us and we let down our valued partners.”

Minnesota: According to The Timberjay, St. Louis County officials are requiring that Tower City Clerk-Treasurer Linda Keith undergo elections re-training in Duluth after a county investigation revealed a host of significant errors, violations of state law, and failures to follow election procedures during the Aug. 14 primary. “The additional training is necessary due to the severity and number of issues identified during the investigation,” wrote St. Louis County Deputy Auditor Phil Chapman, who supervises elections for the county.

Oklahoma: The biggest issue that seemed to arise during Tuesday’s primary runoff was a Bible quote that referenced “the left” and “the right” on a sign outside of a Tulsa County polling place. After the county reached out to the church with complaints about the sign, the church changed the sign so it simply read “Vote!”

South Carolina: During a special election runoff this week voters in parts of Richland County faced delays when voting machines in about a dozen precincts had problems. Voters were offered paper ballots instead.

Election News This Week

Clerks across the state of Michigan have been receiving requests from a mystery organization that wants copies of all the ballots cast in the 2016 presidential election. According to The Detroit Free Press, clerks across Michigan are reporting receiving identical Freedom of Information Act requests seeking copies of the ballots and other records from the election. The FOIA requests come from someone named Emily, no last name given, with the United Action Group. A New York post office post is listed along with a phone number and email address. “It’s unnerved a lot of the clerks,” Michigan Director of Elections Sally Williams told the paper, “Rightfully so. I’m hoping we find out a little bit more about these requesters and what they’re seeking to do.” In addition to election day ballots, the FOIA request also seeks absentee ballots, envelopes the absentee ballots were mailed in, records listing the names of voters who requested absentee ballots and provisional ballots, both counted and uncounted. Williams has reached out to other states, but no one else seems to have received such a request. The Detroit News is reporting that Priorities USA Foundation contracted a third party to send the public record request.

Iowa Secretary of State Paul Pate recently announced that Tribal ID cards from will be accepted for voter and election day registration. “After meeting with a representative of the Sac and Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa and learning more about the tribal enrollment process and tribal identification documents, I felt confident recommending to the Legislature that tribal identification cards be considered proof of identity at the polls on Election Day,” Secretary Pate said. “The Sac and Fox Tribe has been a great partner in this process, and I want to thank them for their willingness to discuss this issue and for providing my staff with a copy of a tribal ID card to place on our educational materials.”

Ride-sharing program Lyft announced last week that it will offer half-priced and free rides to polling places on November 6. According to Tech Crunch, Lyft said that it’s going to give out 50 percent off promotional codes to partners that encourage turnout like Vote.org, Nonprofit VOTE and TurboVote. On the day of the election the company said it will also provide a product integration that will help voters find their polling places to make it even easier to cast their ballot.

The people behind the March For Our Lives have come up with a unique way to get people registered to vote. The group is selling t-shirts with an American flag on the front and the area that is usually blue with white stars is actually QR code that will automatically take someone to a portal to register to vote online once it’s scanned. According to QR Code Press, the shirt was designed by Jammal Lemmy, a former student of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkview, Florida. The idea to add technology, according to Lemy, occurred by accident. He happened to be working on t-shirt graphics of American flags and advertorials featuring QR codes at the same time and decided to combine them. We think this is a pretty cool idea and can only imagine how else QR codes could be used to get folks registered and then out to vote.

Oregon Secretary of State Dennis Richardson (R) released a video update about his health this week. Richardson, 69, was diagnosed with brain cancer in June but has remained on the job throughout. “Other than feeling tired, please know that I’m doing well as I fight this illness,” he said. He also thanked Oregonians for their overwhelming support during his illness.

Congratulations to the Contra Costa County, California Elections Division for earning an Independence Award for innovation from the National Association of Election Officials for the county’s APPLE training program which is a class that trains poll workers on accessibility issues.

Personnel News: Howard “Kit” Carson has announced his candidacy for the Wyoming secretary of state office. Katrena Ebersole is the new Williams County, Ohio elections director. John Zornow is the new Wayne County Republican election commissioner. Megan Meyer is stepping down as the Columbus, Wisconsin clerk less than a year after taking the job. Republican Mary Treder Lang will face Democrat Jocelyn Benson for Michigan secretary of state after their respective parties chose the women as their candidate. Dawn Williams, Iowa State Director of Elections has been inducted in to The Election Center’s Hall of Fame. Dona Ana County, New Mexico Clerk Scott Krahling abruptly resigned this week.

Legislative Updates

California: Senate Bill 759 would require that county election officials notify a voter if their signature on the mail-in ballot does not match the one on file. Voters would have two days before the election results are certified to return a valid signature.

North Carolina: After a three-judge panel removed two constitutional amendments from the November ballot, last week the House passed new language for the amendments in an attempt to get them back on the ballot. One of the amendments sets up a new State Board of Elections and Ethics Enforcement.

Legal Updates

Federal Litigation: The Brennan Center has sued the U.S. Department of Justice alleging that DOJ failed to produce many documents concerning voter registration that the Center had sought through a FOIA request more than a year ago.

Arizona: U.S. District Judge Douglas Rayes has upheld the state’s 2016 law that bans groups from collecting early mail-in ballots from voters and delivering them. The plaintiff in the case said that her free-speech rights were being violated by the ban, but Rayes saw it differently and said he found little evidence that Congress intended to rule out state laws such as this one. An appeal has been filed.

Michigan: U.S. District Court Judge Gershwin Drain has denied the state’s emergency motion to prevent voters from casting straight-ticket ballots. On August 1, the Detroit federal court issued a permanent injunction against the law. The secretary of state’s office appealed the ruling and requested the emergency stay.

Also in Michigan, Promote the Vote, organizers of a ballot initiative that would allow for same-day voter registration as well as no-excuse absentee voting have filed a lawsuit in federal court demanding their initiative be placed on the November ballot. According to the Associated Press, the plaintiffs accuse state election officials of improperly rejecting 24 “incomplete” signatures included in a 500-signature random sample of 432,000 that were submitted in July.

New Jersey: Superior Court Judge Stuart Minkowitz has ruled that the costs of programming electronic voting machines at primary election polling places are a municipality’s responsibility and not the county’s. According to the New Jersey Herald, Minkowitz’s decision was prompted by Vernon’s refusal to pay a $2,863.80 bill from the Sussex County Board of Elections for costs accrued in the run-up to last year’s primary.

North Carolina: Nineteen foreign nationals ranging from age 26 to 71 have been charged with illegally voting in the November 2016 election in North Carolina, the Justice Department announced. Nine of the 19 were also charged with falsely claiming American citizenship to get on voter rolls.

Texas: In a written opinion, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton has said that election judges will be permitted to carry guns at polling places. Election judges in Texas aren’t poll workers per se but, according to the Dallas Morning-News, the “final arbiter in case of a dispute in the outcome a race. The election judge is also required by law to “preserve order” and “prevent breaches of the peace” at their polling place.

Utah: The Utah Supreme Court decided Friday that the Count My Vote initiative will not appear on the Nov. 6 ballot, rejecting arguments that the state’s referendum process is unconstitutionally tilted and unfair. According to The Salt Lake Tribune, Count My Vote collected more than 132,000 verified voter signatures to qualify initially for the ballot, but opponents torpedoed it by convincing a relatively small amount of people in two Senate districts to withdraw signatures during a 30-day review window.

Washington: The Washington Supreme Court has ruled that Initiative 940 may appear on the November ballot. Counties had been unable to begin work on producing and printing ballots while awaiting the court ruling.

Tech Thursday

Election Vendors: Last week, ES&S announced that it will work more closely with the Department of Homeland Security and Information Sharing and Analysis Center in an effort to increase the security of its systems. According to a press release, ES&S said it has formed new partnerships with several DHS offices include the National Protection Programs Directorate. These federal partnerships will help “conduct cyber hygiene scans of ES&S public‐facing internet presence, monitor and share cyber threat information, detect and report indicators of compromise, develop and distribute election security best practices, and raise the election security awareness of election officials and the voting public,” according to the company’s press release. ES&S also said that it will install advanced threat monitoring sensors known as Albert network security sensors in its voter registration environments in an effort to further secure its voting systems.

Cybersecurity: Valimail, an enterprise email security company announced that it will offer its email protections for free to elections officials and campaigns through the 2018 election. According to TechCrunch, the offer covers state election boards, voting system vendors and major party U.S. election campaigns, including congressional, statewide and gubernatorial candidates.

Georgia: Anyone trying to access Georgia’s online voter registration system or My Voter Page from an international internet address will see a message saying “Access Denied”, as well as contact information for assistance. According to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, voters living overseas will still be able to request absentee ballots sand voter registrations online. The sites were removed based on advice from private security vendors and the MS-ISAC.

Louisiana: According to The Associated Press, the state’s Office of State Procurement has told Secretary of State Kyle Ardoin to refrain from conducting any contract talks with the winning bidder to replace the state’s voting system while a protest over the award is settled.

Opinions This Week

Florida: Poll workers | Bilingual ballots | Election security, II, III | Vote-by-mail | Voting rights, II | Voter suppression

Alaska: Election security

Arizona: Maricopa County, II

California: Contra Costa County

Connecticut: Election security

Florida: Vote count | Precinct voting | Ranked choice voting

Georgia: Voting system, II, III | Paper ballots

Indiana: Voting system | Lake County | Early voting | Election security

Kansas: Election officials

Kentucky: Women’s suffrage | Secretary of state

Massachusetts: Secretary of state race, II, III

Michigan: Election board

Minnesota: Voter access

Nebraska: Vote-by-mail

New Jersey: Vote-by-mail

North Carolina: Voter challenges | Amendments | Ex-felon voting

Ohio: Election dates

Oklahoma: Poll workers | Election security bill

South Carolina: Voting machines, II

Texas: Voter registration questions

Upcoming Events

National Election Security Summit — National, state and local election authorities will join officials from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Election Assistance Commission, Elections Infrastructure — Information Sharing and Analysis Center, security professionals, election experts, and other industry leaders to learn and share tangible best practices. These security discussions will provide attendees useable steps to mitigate threats and vulnerabilities as election authorities gear up for the 2018 mid-term elections. This is an event designed for election officials and is not open to the public and space is limited. When: September 10-11. Where: St. Louis, Missouri.

Job Postings This Week

electionlineWeekly publishes election administration job postings each week as a free service to our readers. To have your job listed in the newsletter, please send a copy of the job description, including a web link to mmoretti@electionline.org.  Job postings must be received by 5pm on Wednesday in order to appear in the Thursday newsletter. Listings will run for three weeks or till the deadline listed in the posting.

Certification Manager (Denver, CO) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Certification Manager to join our team in Denver, CO! This position is a cross -functional leader playing a key role in managing certification efforts for Dominion Voting products. In this role, you will act as a representative of the company with State and Federal certification officials, test labs, and other key internal and external stakeholders throughout the certification process. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Customer Relations Manager (Phoenix, AZ) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Customer Relations Manager to join our team in Phoenix, AZ! This position will be responsible for effectively and proactively managing the day-to-day relationship, administration and technical/product support of one or more assigned customer accounts. Additionally, the CRM will serve as project manager for specialized projects such as pre- and postelection day support, new product implementations, and/or product upgrades/updates. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Election Security Lead, Wisconsin Elections Commission — the Wisconsin Elections Commission (WEC) develops and maintains several significant IT applications to assist in the administration of Wisconsin elections, including the statewide voter registration system known as WisVote, the Canvass Reporting System, and electronic poll book software known as Badger Book, as well as public websites such as MyVote Wisconsin and BADGER Voters.  Protecting the security of these applications is crucial to ensuring accurate elections and maintaining public confidence in the integrity of Wisconsin elections. This position serves as the point person for developing and implementing the agency’s overall elections security plan. It is responsible for ensuring the implementation of cyber security best practices in the Commission’s technical applications including WisVote.  This position will research and maintain the agency’s knowledge base regarding cybersecurity infrastructure, resources and practice. This position will also liaise with other State agencies and Federal entities regarding potential cyber threats against the Commission’s applications. Salary: $51,398-$80,621. Deadline: Open until filled. Application. For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Supervisor, Pinal County, Arizona— performs professional and administrative work in planning, organizing and directing strategic and daily goals and objectives, operations and activities of the Elections Department. Work is performed under the general administrative direction of the Elections Director. The employee is expected to exercise initiative, independent judgment and discretion. Salary: $49,647-$56,473. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Embedded System Software Engineer, Clear Ballot — Clear Ballot is looking for a talented Software Engineer who wants to bring their technical skills to bear on a hugely consequential problem. The successful candidate will build and enhance full software stack of highly available applications using primarily Python that interface with front-end web applications implemented in JavaScript and HTML5.  The application software deploys on OEM based hardware, with optical scanner, battery backup, and full touchscreen UI, running a custom configured version of Linux OS. The ideal candidate should have strong technical skills, solid understanding of developing for embedded systems, a good working knowledge of the Linux architecture, and software integration with OEM hardware devices. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build and enhance a platform that is changing the elections industry. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Field Sales Director, Hart InterCivic — the Field Sales Director works primarily on the road and from a home office when he/she is not on business travel. The Field Sales Director is responsible for creating news sales with prospects and existing clients in a defined region. Today, this role is a single contributor and does not directly manage people.   This position will report to the VP of Sales. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Full Stack Principal Software Engineer, Clear Ballot— Clear Ballot is looking for an accomplished Principal Software Engineer who wants to bring their technical and leadership skills to bear on a hugely consequential problem: Bringing transparency to democratic elections.  The successful candidate will have the ability to look at the bigger picture and deal with complex and competing requirements to design effective solutions. Extensive knowledge of and experience with large data structures and algorithms will be key.  The backend implemented in Python and uses a SQL data base. The front end is implemented in JavaScript, Node.js and HTML5. The ideal candidate should have strong technical and leadership skills and a good working knowledge of the latest concepts in security, performance, and resilience. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build and enhance a platform that is changing the elections industry. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Full Stack Software Developer, Clear Ballot— Clear Ballot is looking for a talented Software Engineer who wants to bring their technical skills to bear on a hugely consequential problem. The successful candidate will build and enhance enterprise-level, highly available applications using primarily Python and MySQL that interface with frontend web applications implemented in JavaScript, Node.js and HTML5.  The ideal candidate should have strong technical skills and a good working knowledge of the latest concepts in performance, security and resilience. One of the hallmarks of our system is its emphasis on new visualization techniques made possible by sophisticated data structures that enable high-performance in a multi-user environment. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build and enhance a platform that is changing the elections industry. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Full-Stack Software Engineer, Clear Ballot — Clear Ballot is looking for a talented Software Engineer who wants to bring their technical skills to bear on a hugely consequential problem – to modernize America’s voting systems and to bring transparency to democratic elections.  The successful candidate will build and enhance enterprise-level, highly available applications using primarily Python and MySQL that interface with frontend web applications implemented in JavaScript, Node.js and HTML5. The ideal candidate should have strong technical skills and a good working knowledge of the latest concepts in performance, security and resilience. One of the hallmarks of our system is its emphasis on new visualization techniques made possible by sophisticated data structures that enable high-performance in a multi-user environment. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build and enhance a platform that is changing the elections industry. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Inside Sales Representative, Runbeck — to support our desired growth and market expansion, we continue to hire outstanding talent in multiple departments. We are looking for highly motivated, dedicated and talented individuals who will be able to contribute significantly to the success of the company while receiving great opportunities for professional growth and financial benefits. Responsibilities include: Contact potential or existing customers to inform them about a product or service; ability to present solution and its value to a prospect over the phone; answer questions about products or the company; ask questions to understand customer requirements and close sales; enter and update customer information in the database; keep records of calls and sale and note useful information in the CRM; process orders in an accurate manner; and go the “extra mile” to meet sales quota and facilitate future sales. Application: In order to apply, please send a resume to Tammy White: twhite@runbeck.net.

Project Manager (San Leandro, CA or Sacramento, CA) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking an experienced Project Manager to join our team in either San Leandro, CA or Sacramento, CA! This position will be responsible for the effective technical project management of assigned projects which includes but not limited to, business, functional, and risk analysis as well as implementation of new processes, equipment and systems. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Python Developer, Clear Ballot — Clear Ballot seeks a talented python developer in the Boston area to assume responsibility for an existing suite of python scripts to create files for use with ClearVote(TM) digital voting system. Job responsibilities: Maintain and enhance existing python scripts that read PDF formatted ballot styles and produce the files needed by ClearVote (TM) digital voting system to tabulate said ballot; Run existing python scripts to generate marked test ballots for use in testing ClearVote(TM); Develop and execute test plans to guarantee ClearVote tabulates marked ballots correctly; Expand PDF parsing capabilities as new customer’s ballot styles are introduced; Leverage analytics you gather to improve performance through script and/or hardware changes; Must perform these duties within aggressive timelines that often require working outside of normal business hours. Application: For the complete listing and to apply, click here.

Senior Level Software Developer, BPro — We are a well-established small business that has been developing requirements and producing software for the needs of state governments since 1985 and continue to maintain and upgrade many of those systems. We have offices in Pierre, South Dakota, Fargo, North Dakota, Minnesota & Virginia. We’re currently looking for an energetic and intelligent .Net Developer to join our growing team. Our ideal candidate is one who loves to learn, enjoys working as a team, and who can multitask and meet deadlines. Skills required: .NET, VB, VBA, ASP, SQL, HTML, and JavaScript. A four-year college degree is the minimum educational requirement. All applicants must have excellent written and verbal communications skills. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Senior Software Developer, Runbeck— Runbeck Election Services is looking for full stack enthusiasts who are comfortable tackling end-to-end and enjoy building products that solve big problems and delight customers. We’re a collaborative team who knows how to get things done (Lone Rangers need not apply). We believe that small teams focused on shipping software move the fastest and make the most impact. The ideal candidate for this position has extensive back end skills (C#, MVC, ASP.Net, SQL Server) paired with solid web and desktop skills (IIS, JavaScript, HTML 5, CSS, jQuery, WPF, Win Forms). Must have a solid grasp of our basic toolset (Jira, Visual Studio). Willing to learn new plug-ins and IDE enhancements in order to boost your productivity and are excited to introduce us to new tooling experiences that have worked for you in the past. You bring discipline and care about implementation practices. You are familiar with Agile/Scrum processes, practice common design patterns, embrace clean coding principles, and employ many other techniques in an effort to bring a high level of software craftsmanship to your finished product. Application: In order to apply, please send a resume to Tammy White: twhite@runbeck.net.

Software Developer II (Toronto, ON) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking an experienced Software Developer to join our team in Toronto! This position will be responsible for providing high-level technical expertise to the design, development, coding, testing and debugging of new software products and/or significant enhancements to existing software products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Software Product Specialist II (Denver, CO) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Software Product Specialist II to join our team in Denver, Colorado! This position will be responsible for delivering a wide variety of technical and non-technical customer support services related to the implementation, operation, repair, maintenance and upgrades of Dominion Voting Systems technology products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Software Product Specialist II (Reno, NV) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Software Product Specialist II to join our team in Reno, NV! This position will be responsible for delivering a wide variety of technical and non-technical customer support services related to the implementation, operation, repair, maintenance and upgrades of Dominion Voting Systems technology products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Software Product Specialist II (Phoenix, AZ) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Software Product Specialist II to join our team in Phoenix, AZ! This position will be responsible for delivering a wide variety of technical and non-technical customer support services related to the implementation, operation, repair, maintenance and upgrades of Dominion Voting Systems technology products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Software Product Specialist II (San Leandro, CA) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Software Product Specialist II to join our team in San Leandro, CA! This position will be responsible for delivering a wide variety of technical and non-technical customer support services related to the implementation, operation, repair, maintenance and upgrades of Dominion Voting Systems technology products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Systems Engineer, Clear Ballot — We are looking for a talented Systems Engineer who has both a technical and services/support background which enables them to quickly assess customer needs and offer value to Clear Ballot’s customers. The Systems Engineer will gain a deep understanding of how Clear Ballot’s products operate and their optimal configuration to build a streamlined installation process of the Clear Vote election system. The ideal candidate for this position can prioritize mission critical tasks and coordinate the implementation and expansion of our systems. They will be able to work directly with customers, display innovation, think conceptually and act tactically to build consensus around system installation and enhancement and meet deadlines. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

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