electionline Weekly

September 13, 2018

September 13, 2018

In Focus This Week

Creating a culture of proactive security
Colorado’s EPIC TTX prepares for almost any scenario

By M. Mindy Moretti
electionline.org

There was a fire, a tornado, and the heating system went down in the ballot-tabulation room. There was fake news on social media and real news media in the room. Polls opened late and stayed open late.

The state voter registration database went down. Tabulation machines failed to tabulate. There were concerned citizens and advocates demanding to know what was happening.

And then there was Olga from Sputnik News who seemed overly curious about everything.

Those were just some of the scenarios and situations faced by Colorado county elections officials and staff participating in the secretary of states EPIC table top exercise last week in Englewood.

The day-long EPIC TTX was based on a similar tabletop training exercise conducted by the Belfer Center in March of this year with 38 state elections officials and was designed to help prepare county elections officials and their staff for any and every possibility.

And based on reactions from county clerks in attendance, the effort of the secretary of state’s office was well worth it and many county clerk left Englewood vowing to put what they had learned into action immediately.

“I immediately met with my county administrator to discuss cyber security within my office and throughout our county offices, for both right now and what it could look like in the future,” said Eryn Wintz, Mineral County clerk and recorder. “I also had a very honest discussion about my security and contingency plan that included actual practices and how to protect myself and by reflection the state by not being the “weakest link” because of limitations set by logistics or financial restraints.”

The morning was divided into two sessions. In the first hour-long session, the groups drilled through problems and situations that could arise in the five months leading up to Election Day. During the second one-hour session it was Election Day.

Moderators, which included elections officials from other states, national association staff and staff from the secretary of state’s office helped move the sessions along. All participants were assigned a role for the day, some of those roles are not who they are in real life.

Pulling off the EPIX TTX was a massive undertaking for the secretary of state’s office, but one that seems worth the effort. According to Judd Choate, director of elections, things went amazingly well.

“Better than even my most optimistic expectations,” Choate said. “Our county election officials have been effusive in their praise. More importantly, I know they walked out with a long ‘to do’ list that will lead to more security Colorado elections. So it was a huge success.”

Choate wasn’t always so sure it was going to be the success that it was though.

“Trevor Timmons (Colorado CIO), Caleb Thornton (Colorado elections legal), along with Jennifer Morrell (Democracy Fund), Amber McReynolds (Nationall Vote at Home), Dan Volkosh (Denver Elections) and I came home from the Belfer event in March and decided to roll it out for this election,” he explained. “That might have been a strategic error – because the time commitment was extraordinary, but I’m pleased we did it.”

There were three informal teams for 1) scenario development, 2) logistics, and 3) counties, moderators, and observers (press too) coordination.

“We will make several adjustments for future EPICs, but the basic format and scenarios worked very well,” Choate said.

The tabletop exercise cost about $100,000 because the state paid for all county and moderator travel. Over 300 people attended, most of whom needed reimbursement (hotel, meals, mileage). The state will use the new HAVA funds to pay for the training.

Following lunch, where Department of Homeland Security  Secretary of State Kirstjen Nielsen addressed the gathering and called Colorado’s elections the most secure in the nation, the participants met based on their roles during the exercises to debrief and come up with five to six takeaways from their roles.

Communications and takeaways
The big takeaway from the day seemed to be communication. Either with the press, between the state and counties or between county clerks and their staff and the public, the importance of communication was brought up time and time again.

“Well since they hammered communication, I have to say that, right? No, really I think communication is vital,” said LaRita Randolph, Dolores County clerk and recorder. “Whether it means County to State, County to County & County to voters. We all need to be on the same page & good communication is the only way for that to be accomplished.”

Interestingly enough, Choate said that one issue the secretary’s office had in pulling of the TTX was with the media.

“The press were a bit more demanding than we anticipated,” Choate said. “We will adjust to that in the future. At least the coverage was good.”

Communication was also something that Lori Mitchell, Chaffee County clerk and recorder and current president of the Colorado County Clerks Association said she could be learn a thing or two about.

“I thought I was a good communicator, but I learned that I have some work to do especially around involving more of or staff and others in our County Government,” Mitchell said. “Another valuable thing for me was to role play another position so that you learned about a different job than you normally do.”

Alton Dillard, the Denver Elections PIO said for him it was interesting to interact with elections officials from jurisdictions of different sizes and learn what their experiences working with the media have been like. In a reversal of roles, Dillard portrayed a reporter during the EPIC TTX so he got to ask questions of participants that were based on the ones he gets on daily basis.

“The way it was set up, a lot of the people playing the PIO role weren’t PIOs in real life so it was an eyeopener for them too,” Dillard said. “As a 13 year Elections PIO, (and Dean of the Colorado delegation when it comes to specializing in election communications) EPIC also illustrated the evolving narrative around elections especially in today’s social media era and with elections security being front page news . The scenarios from the injects that occurred at EPIC could also occur overnight and that’s why it’s important to monitor your social media accounts constantly.”

Several county officials were overheard mentioning that they wished they had brought their PIOs with them to the event. Dillard said the one thing he hopes the clerks take back to their PIOs is the importance of making sure that they are looped in early and often and keeping their communications plan updated.

“Your communicator can’t be the last to know what may be going on in today’s environment,” Dillard said.

In addition to communication, there were lots of important takeaways from the day, but for Wintz from Mineral County, she said it was hard to just pick one.

“Perhaps the most important for me was a simple call to up my game. That encompasses so many things. The reality of the importance, the very real threat of infiltration, the target on Colorado that could by default be directed to the smallest and most rural counties,” Wintz said. “Also the appreciation for the people I have the privilege of working with, their tenacity, intelligence, and supportive nature.”

The secretary of state’s office even learned a thing or two during EPIC.

“We learned that it’s one thing to have a plan,” Choate said. “It’s another altogether to convey that plan to county election officials. So, we need to work on our communication strategy for basic election security as well as acute circumstances that require immediate action.”

DHS participation
In addition to luncheon remarks by the DHS secretary, there were more than 15 DHS officials at EPIC moderating, observing and participating the training.

“Their contributions were essential to our success,” Choate said. “David Stern led a team of seven DHS trainers who flew in to serve as moderators (at no cost to us). They were especially important. I’m humbled by how much effort DHS is expending on helping states and localities secure elections. Between funding EI-ISAC, running and assisting in elections TTXs, and the extraordinary resources they have to offer, the DHS is clearly all-in on election security. The DHS election team even ripped off some fantastic “Last Mile” posters for us that each county took home to post in their office.”

Next steps
Choate said the secretary’s office they would like to do reginal versions during one of their training cycles and do a full EPIC, with all counties represented on the odd years going forward.

The clerks in attendance that we spoke to all highly recommended that those states that haven’t done tabletop exercises like this really should.

“As Election Administrators, we have to take voter confidence seriously,” Randolph said. “Not just their perceptions, but also facts, and keep our elections secure.”

Mitchell from Chaffee County said that in addition to states doing a similar tabletop exercise, counties too should consider putting on their own TTX.

“Every state should replicate this exercise and adapt it to their voting model and procedures. It was so beneficial,” Mitchell said. “I want to do a scaled down version at the County level.”

And Choate said the Colorado secretary of state’s office is ready to help!

“The first thing I would say is – go all out. Your locals will learn more if you have them live it,” Choate said. “Second, there are a lot of people out there who can help. I’m happy to help for one, but DHS is a great resource, and all the election officials around the country who have been doing these themselves (NC, IL, WI, WA, WV, etc.). It’s a lot of work, so take your time and do it right. But, those of us who have lived it can help you cut some corners without missing the essential learning experience.”

Update on the News: Following the publication of our story last week about how states handle international IPs, we heard back from a few more states on their process. The story has been updated and can be found here.

Federal-State Updates

This week, President Donald J. Trump signed an executive order authorizing sanctions against foreigners who meddle in U.S. elections.

“We felt it was important to demonstrate the president has taken command of this issue, that it’s something he cares deeply about — that the integrity of our elections and our constitutional process are a high priority to him,” national security adviser John Bolton said, according to The Associated Press.

The order calls for sanctioning any individual, company or country that interferes with campaign infrastructure, such as voter registration databases, voting machines and equipment used for tabulating or transmitting results. It also authorizes sanctions for engaging in covert, fraudulent or deceptive activities, such as distributing disinformation or propaganda, to influence or undermine confidence in U.S. elections.

Primary Updates

Delaware: Voters in the First State went to the polls on Thursday the 6th and there were no reports of any issues. A petition to audit the elections results was started by one campaign, but the state moved forward with certification without the audit. The Delaware State News did note that despite the fact that the election was on a Thursday and not the typical Tuesday, voter turnout was impressive.

Massachusetts: Following last week’s primary election, the office of Secretary of State William Galvin (D) has taken over the operations elections departments in Lowell and Lawrence while the office investigates their practices.

New Hampshire: Voters in the Granite State hit the polls on Tuesday, Sept. 11 and there were no reports of problems. Turnout was hit or miss. Londonderry Town Clerk Sherry Farrell noted that the polls had been quite busy despite the fact that there were many uncontested races on the ballot. University of New Hampshire and Dartmouth students turned out in strong numbers with many registering for the first time to vote in New Hampshire. Hanover noticed a marked uptick in same-day registration.

Rhode Island: Rhode Island rolled out e-poll books statewide for the first time this primary and overall things seemed to go well with the new check-in system. One Newport voter reported being unable to vote because his party affiliation had been switched by the state’s Division of Motor Vehicles. In Providence, one polling place opened about 20 minutes late because poll workers didn’t have the required passwords to access the voting system.

Research and Report Summaries

Research and Report Summaries are provided by Sean Greene. Greene has served as the director of research for the U.S. Election Assistance Commission and the Pew Center on the States Election Initiatives. He currently lives in Rome where he is studying Italian, drinking Moretti beer and still paying close attention to the administration of elections in the United States. He’s looking forward to casting his first ballot as a UOCAVA voter.

2016 Overseas Citizen Population Analysis Report, Federal Voting Assistance Program (FVAP), September 12, 2018: In its most recent biennial Overseas Citizen Population Analysis (OCPA), FVAP estimates there were three million U.S. citizens of voting age living abroad in 2016. Of these approximately 208,000, or 7 percent, cast ballots compared with a domestic turnout of 72 percent. The report attributes some of this gap in turnout to challenges faced by overseas voters such as speed of mail delivery.

Of the nearly three million voting age citizens living overseas it is estimated the most, more than 620,000, live in Canada, followed by nearly 320,000 in the United Kingdom, and approximately 200,000 in Mexico.

Securing the Vote: Protecting American Democracy, a Consensus Study Report of The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, September 2018: This report, written by a committee of experts from a variety of fields, recommends several actions federal, state, and local officials can take to improve election security including:

  • Elections should be conducted by human-readable paper ballots and voting machines that cannot be independently audited should no longer be used.
  • States should mandate risk-limiting audits.
  • Internet voting should not be used now and should only be used when there are guarantees of secrecy, security, and verifiability.
  • The integrity of voter registration databases should be routinely assessed.
  • Jurisdictions using electronic poll books should have a back-up plan in case the use of those systems is disrupted.
  • The designation of elections as critical infrastructure should continue.

Operations and Performance of Virginia’s Department of Elections, Joint Legislative Audit and Review Commission, Sept. 10, 2018: This report to the Governor and General Assembly of Virginia evaluated the operation and performance of the state Department of Elections. The findings include:

  • The state uses a fairly robust process to maintain its voter registration list but there is room for improvement.
  • The state’s IT system that maintains the voter registration list and interacts with local agencies is not sufficiently functional or reliable.
  • Department of Election oversight of local election administration does not fully assure election integrity and uniformity.
  • The department has lacked continuity of leadership and continues to be susceptible to political influence.
    More than 20 recommendations are provided to help make improvements in these areas.

Election News This Week

Vote-by-Mail News: Lots of vote-by-mail related news this week. In New Jersey, county clerks are expressing concerns that a change to the state’s vote-by-mail law may confuse voters. Under the law, voters who requested mail-in ballots for all future elections will continue to get them until they opt out. That’s a change from previous law that required officials to check in with mail-in voters to ask if they want to continue after the fourth general election since they signed up. Voters in Dawes County, South Dakota will be voting by mail moving forward. In Utah, Washington County has joined a growing number of Utah counties that rely solely on vote-by-mail. And in Los Angeles County, California, the registrar-recorder’s office has redesigned the ballot cards so they are easier to understand. “You actually fill in the oval right next to the name of the candidate or the response to the measure that you want to look at,” Dean Logan, L.A. County Registrar-Recorder/County Clerk, told ABC7. In L.A. County, 2.2 million registered voters receive their ballot by mail. LA County will also be providing return postage for all ballots.

While elections officials along the East Coast are doing what they can to prepare for Hurricane Florence, officials in Jefferson County, Arkansas are faced with inoperable voting equipment and extensive water damage to the Jefferson County Election Commission after the building was hit by flash flooding and ceiling leaks from heavy rains this weekend. While the weekend’s rains exacerbated the situation, the problems really began back in the spring from a hailstorm that damaged the building. “It’s very concerning to me that if we don’t have voting machines and a building to use — it’s devastating if we don’t have an election,” Michael Adam, chairman of the Jefferson County Election Commission to KATV.

This week, National Public Radio ran an interesting series of stories about why Americans don’t vote. While some of the series does focus on barriers to voting such as lack of early voting or ID laws, most of the series focuses on the psychology behind not voting.

This may be the geekiest of election geek things, be we think it sounds pretty cool. The Tennessee secretary of state’s office is hosting a workshop entitled “Glorious Victory: Election Records at the Tennessee State Library and Archives,” where a veteran genealogist will show how election records can help with genealogy. The Tennessee State Library and Archives has documents directly relating to local, state and national elections, along with military election records from the early 1800s. The office regularly refers to the 1891 Enumeration List as an alternate to the 1890 Tennessee census. “Tennessee has a rich history of civic involvement,” said Tre Hargett, secretary of state. “These historical election-related records speak to this history and serve to encourage all of us to redouble our own civic efforts and carry on the important legacy and example of good citizenship demonstrated by our ancestors.”

electionline is sending good thoughts for a speedy recovery to Montcalm County, Michigan Clerk Kristen Millard who is in serious condition at an area hospital after losing control of her motorcycle in a single-vehicle accident.

Personnel News: Libertarian Ginger Grider has announced her candidacy for New Mexico secretary of state. Dr. Amanda Lopez Askin has been selected as the new Dona Ana County, New Mexico clerk. Medford, Massachusetts City Clerk Ed Finn has stepped down after 20 years on the job. Thad Hall has joined the Richland County South Carolina board of voter registration and elections as deputy director.

In Memoriam: Dr. Glyde Marsh of New Albany, Ohio died on September 11th. He was two days shy of his 100th birthday. Marsh was a veteran of World War II and a pre-eminent poultry veterinarian. He was also Ohio’s oldest election official serving on the New Albany City Council since 1998. Marsh had served as a Franklin County poll worker since 1954. He worked every election but one when he was recovering from an accident and he had planned to work the upcoming general election in November. “You want to be able to complain about your government and you have no right to complain if you’re not voting,” Marsh told a local television station before his passing.

Legislative Updates

Federal Legislation: Rep. Bob Gibbs (R-Ohio) has introduced legislation that would require all potential voters to provide proof-of-citizenship when registering to vote. The proposed legislation would require that documentation like a valid U.S. passport, a certified birth certificate issued by a state, a consular report of birth abroad issued by the U.S. Secretary of State, or a naturalization certificate, or certificate of citizenship issued by the U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security be presented when one registers to vote.

Maine: Gov. Paul LePage has vetoed legislation that would provide funding to conduct the upcoming November election via ranked-choice voting.

Michigan: State elections officials have certified a ballot measure for the November 6 ballot that, if approved, would allow for same-day voter registration and no-excuse absentee voting.

New Jersey: Democrats have introduced a bill setting a requirement for how much in federal election security funds must be used for new voting machines, an amount that is nearly twice as much as what the governor’s administration is planning.

New York: State Sen. Elaine Phillips (R-Nassau County) has introduced legislation that would allow public schools to opt out of serving as polling places on Election Day. We need to let schools decide if opening their doors puts children at additional risk, and if more suitable sites should be found for Election Day voting,” Phillips told The New York Post.

Legal Updates

Arizona: The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals as has set an October 3 hearing to hear arguments in the legality of the state’s ballot harvesting ban.

In other 9th Circuit news, a three-judge panel has said the Democratic National Committee could not produce “a single voter” to testify that it was harder for them to vote because of the state’s ballot-harvesting law. The court also said that the state’s rule that eliminates ballots cast outside of a person’s assigned precinct does not impose a burden on voters and that it is outweighed by the state’s need to conduct orderly elections.

Florida: In a 27-page ruling, U.S. District Judge Mark Walker partially sided with plaintiffs in a federal lawsuit that sought have elections officials in 32 counties provide Spanish-language ballots. Walker ordered officials to provide sample ballots in Spanish, but did not go so far as to require bilingual ballots and poll workers. “Voting in a language you do not understand is like asking this court [to] decide the winner of the Nobel Prize for Chemistry — ineffective, in other words,” Walker wrote. “Courts have long held that the right to vote includes not only the right to physically enter a polling place and fill out a ballot but also the right to comprehend and understand what is on that ballot.”

Michigan: The U.S. Supreme Court turned down an appeal of a lower court ruling on Michigan’s straight-ticket voting mean voters will not be able to use a single mark to choose all the candidates from one party.

New Mexico: The New Mexico Supreme Court unanimously ruled in favor of a petition by the state Republican and Libertarian parties seeking to stop the implementation of straight-ticket voting.

North Carolina: According to The Outer Banks Voice, federal prosecutors and ICE officials have revised their subpoena for voting records in 44 counties in North Carolina. In their revised subpoena, prosecutors have given officials until January to comply with the subpoenas. The state Board of Elections voted to fight the subpoenas, regardless of the deadline.

Also in North Carolina, Buffy Christina Quinn, 39 has been indicted on a felony charge of violation of election law for voting in the 2016 while she was still on probation.

North Dakota: The state has asked the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to overturn a lower court’s ruling that found problems with how the state’s voter ID laws affect Native Americans. U.S. District Judge Daniel Hovland in April agreed to expand the proof of identity Native Americans can use for North Dakota elections. The judge also ordered eliminating a requirement that those documents include residential street addresses, which sometimes aren’t assigned on American Indian reservations. The state argues the required changes could lead to voter fraud.

Tech Thursday

Texas: An article in the Longview News-Journal details the steps Texas is slowly but surely taking toward online voter registration. Earlier this year, the state was ordered by a federal judge to allow voters to register online when they also use that method to renew driver’s licenses. While not yet available, partisans and elections officials are gearing up for its debut.

Opinions This Week

National Opinions: Nonvoters | Ranked choice voting | Election security | Voter suppression
Book Reviews: The Embattle Vote in America | One Person, No Vote
Alaska: Ranked choice voting | Election investigation
Arizona: Maricopa County, II
California: Automatic voter registration
Colorado: Election security
Florida: Poll workers | Ballot length | Write-in loophole
Guam: Voting system
Hawaii: Voting abuses
Illinois: Election security
Kentucky: Secretary of state
Massachusetts: Ranked-choice voting
Michigan: Straight-ticket voting | Elections ballot initiative
Minnesota: Election security | Tower City elections
New Jersey: Felon voting rights
New Mexico: Straight-ticket voting, II | Ranked choice voting | Election consolidation | Voter disenfranchisement
New York: Voting laws; Voter accessibility
North Carolina: Election system | Ballot subpoenas, II, III, IV, V
Oregon: Vote-by-mail, II
Pennsylvania: Young voters | Election security
Tennessee: Turnout, II
Texas: Voter registration
Utah: San Juan County
Virginia: Election process | Elections oversight
West Virginia: Election integrity | Rock the vote | Blockchain voting

Clearie Awards

EAC “Clearies” Honor Innovation, Leadership in Election Administration

By Brian Newby
EAC Executive Director

What’s your secret to a successful election that serves the needs of voters? The U.S. Election Assistance Commission (EAC) invites you to tell the commission about your work and enter it for consideration in the third annual national competition for best practices in election administration.

The EAC clearinghouse awards, dubbed the “Clearies” for short, offer a great stage to celebrate and share innovative programs cultivated by election offices. In meeting our Help America Vote Act (HAVA) charge to serve as an informational clearinghouse for election officials, the EAC is pleased to recognize the forward-looking and effective efforts of election officials across America. These accolades are just one way the commission can meet the promise of HAVA and further its clearinghouse efforts.

As we travel the country and meet with election officials, we see first-hand countless fresh and innovative election initiatives deployed throughout the nation. The EAC established these awards to acknowledge the hard work, determination, and “can-do” spirit that election officials bring to even the most detailed of Election Day tasks. The EAC hopes you’ll consider entering this year’s competition so that we can honor your efforts and promote your successes.

As we did last year, the EAC is seeking entries for three categories: 1) innovations in elections, 2) best practices related to the recruiting, training, and retaining of election workers, and 3) accessibility for voters with disabilities. The 2017 winners of the Clearie awards can be found here and the work of others who submitted entries last year has been featured in the EAC’s blog and other resources throughout the year.

To make this year’s competition even more meaningful, the EAC has made the decision to dedicate the 2018 Clearies in honor of the life and legacy of Wendy Noren and R. Brian Lewis. Wendy Noran served as Clerk of Boone County, Missouri for over three decades and was an active member of the EAC’s Board of Advisors before her passing. R. Brian Lewis served as Counsel to the office of the Senate Majority Leader and the Senate Rules and Administration Committee before his passing and was an early and steadfast proponent of HAVA and election officials. Both were leaders in the field of election administration who will long be remembered for their hard work, integrity, and friendship. Their work is a beacon for the kind of innovation and dedication the EAC honors through the Clearies.

The deadline for your Cleary submissions is Friday, October 5th. To foster participation from all corners of the elections community, we purposely keep the Clearies entry process simple and straightforward. Applications from all perspectives and types of jurisdictions are encouraged to submit their work. And since we recognize that this is a busy time of year, submissions can be as simple as a half-page narrative or as complex as a series of documents and multimedia. All entries will be evaluated on their merit and previously set criteria, which include:

  • Efficacy
  • Innovation
  • Sustainability
  • Outreach efforts
  • Cost-effectiveness
  • Replicability

Submissions should be sent by email to clearinghouse@eac.gov. While there is no set application, those applying should provide a brief summary of their program. They can also choose to attach any relevant documents, pictures, and links that support their submission. In the subject line, applicants should state which particular competition they are entering. If candidates have entries for more than one category, they should email them separately. Submissions should also include contact information for the person submitting the program for consideration.

We look forward to receiving your entries to this year’s Clearies. For more information about the competition, please contact Patrick Leahy at pleahy@eac.gov.

Upcoming Events

EAC Online Discussion about Voter Registration — The U.S. Election Assistance Commission (EAC) will host an online event on Wednesday, September 19 to discuss two pre-election dates that are important to elections officials and voters: September 22, the 45-day deadline for states to send absentee ballots to uniformed and overseas citizen voters; and September 25, National Voter Registration Day. The 11 a.m. Eastern Time event will be live-streamed on Facebook and the EAC’s website, www.eac.gov. Moderated by EAC Chairman Thomas Hicks, the discussion will feature David Beirne, Director of the Federal Voting Assistance Program, and Brian Miller, Executive Director of Nonprofit Vote, detailing their organizations’ activities to ensure voters know they have an opportunity to cast a ballot in the upcoming midterm elections. Where: Online. When: 11 a.m.; September 19.

IGO Post-Election Audits Webinar — There’s a lot of buzz around post-election audits and Risk-limiting audits (RLAs). This webinar will explain RLA terms and definitions, and will outline the key elements for conducting a RLA, including the use of technology. We’ll also discuss the benefits, challenges, and best practices, and what can be done to enhance a traditional post-election audit. Finally, we’ll learn about the post-election audit program that was recently implemented in Utah. Our presenters are Jennifer Morrell from the Democracy Fund’s Election Validation Project and Ryan Cowley, Election Director for Weber County, Utah. Where: Online: When: 4pm, September 19.

International Association of Government Officials — IGO’s 2019 mid-winter conference will be held in Irvine, California, January 6-11, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of State Election Directors — The NASED Winter Conference will be held in Washington DC, February 1-4, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of Secretaries of State — The NASS Winter Conference will be held in Washington, DC, February 1-4, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

International Association of Government Officials — IGO’s 2019 Annual Conference will be held in Houston, Texas, July 11-17. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of Counties — NACo’s 2019 Annual Conference will be held in Clark County (Las Vegas), Nevada July 11-15, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

National Association of State Election Directors — The NASED Summer Conference will be held in Austin, Texas, July 14-16, 2019. Watch this space for more details about agendas and registration.

Job Postings This Week

electionlineWeekly publishes election administration job postings each week as a free service to our readers. To have your job listed in the newsletter, please send a copy of the job description, including a web link to mmoretti@electionline.org. Job postings must be received by 5pm on Wednesday in order to appear in the Thursday newsletter. Listings will run for three weeks or till the deadline listed in the posting.

Certification Manager (Denver, CO) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Certification Manager to join our team in Denver, CO! This position is a cross -functional leader playing a key role in managing certification efforts for Dominion Voting products. In this role, you will act as a representative of the company with State and Federal certification officials, test labs, and other key internal and external stakeholders throughout the certification process. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Customer Relations Manager (Phoenix, AZ) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Customer Relations Manager to join our team in Phoenix, AZ! This position will be responsible for effectively and proactively managing the day-to-day relationship, administration and technical/product support of one or more assigned customer accounts. Additionally, the CRM will serve as project manager for specialized projects such as pre- and postelection day support, new product implementations, and/or product upgrades/updates. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Program Manager, CIS— the Elections Program Manager is assigned to the Elections Infrastructure ISAC (EI-ISAC) at the Center for Internet Security. Reporting to the Director of the EI-ISAC, the Elections Program Manager will partner with other cybersecurity team members to promote the CIS mission and help support our growth. The primary purpose of this position is to serve as a subject matter expert on and represent the EI-ISAC in public forums regarding election infrastructure issues. The Elections Program Manager will work with the EI-ISAC Director to build relationships in the elections community and identify tools, products, and initiatives that meet the security needs of election officials. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Elections Supervisor, Pinal County, Arizona— performs professional and administrative work in planning, organizing and directing strategic and daily goals and objectives, operations and activities of the Elections Department. Work is performed under the general administrative direction of the Elections Director. The employee is expected to exercise initiative, independent judgment and discretion. Salary: $49,647-$56,473. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Embedded System Software Engineer, Clear Ballot — Clear Ballot is looking for a talented Software Engineer who wants to bring their technical skills to bear on a hugely consequential problem. The successful candidate will build and enhance full software stack of highly available applications using primarily Python that interface with front-end web applications implemented in JavaScript and HTML5. The application software deploys on OEM based hardware, with optical scanner, battery backup, and full touchscreen UI, running a custom configured version of Linux OS. The ideal candidate should have strong technical skills, solid understanding of developing for embedded systems, a good working knowledge of the Linux architecture, and software integration with OEM hardware devices. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build and enhance a platform that is changing the elections industry. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Field Sales Director, Hart InterCivic — the Field Sales Director works primarily on the road and from a home office when he/she is not on business travel. The Field Sales Director is responsible for creating news sales with prospects and existing clients in a defined region. Today, this role is a single contributor and does not directly manage people. This position will report to the VP of Sales. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Full Stack Principal Software Engineer, Clear Ballot— Clear Ballot is looking for an accomplished Principal Software Engineer who wants to bring their technical and leadership skills to bear on a hugely consequential problem: Bringing transparency to democratic elections. The successful candidate will have the ability to look at the bigger picture and deal with complex and competing requirements to design effective solutions. Extensive knowledge of and experience with large data structures and algorithms will be key. The backend implemented in Python and uses a SQL data base. The front end is implemented in JavaScript, Node.js and HTML5. The ideal candidate should have strong technical and leadership skills and a good working knowledge of the latest concepts in security, performance, and resilience. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build and enhance a platform that is changing the elections industry. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Full Stack Software Developer, Clear Ballot— Clear Ballot is looking for a talented Software Engineer who wants to bring their technical skills to bear on a hugely consequential problem. The successful candidate will build and enhance enterprise-level, highly available applications using primarily Python and MySQL that interface with frontend web applications implemented in JavaScript, Node.js and HTML5. The ideal candidate should have strong technical skills and a good working knowledge of the latest concepts in performance, security and resilience. One of the hallmarks of our system is its emphasis on new visualization techniques made possible by sophisticated data structures that enable high-performance in a multi-user environment. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build and enhance a platform that is changing the elections industry. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Full-Stack Software Engineer, Clear Ballot — Clear Ballot is looking for a talented Software Engineer who wants to bring their technical skills to bear on a hugely consequential problem – to modernize America’s voting systems and to bring transparency to democratic elections. The successful candidate will build and enhance enterprise-level, highly available applications using primarily Python and MySQL that interface with frontend web applications implemented in JavaScript, Node.js and HTML5. The ideal candidate should have strong technical skills and a good working knowledge of the latest concepts in performance, security and resilience. One of the hallmarks of our system is its emphasis on new visualization techniques made possible by sophisticated data structures that enable high-performance in a multi-user environment. You will be working with a small team of highly skilled individuals to build and enhance a platform that is changing the elections industry. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Inside Sales Representative, Runbeck — to support our desired growth and market expansion, we continue to hire outstanding talent in multiple departments. We are looking for highly motivated, dedicated and talented individuals who will be able to contribute significantly to the success of the company while receiving great opportunities for professional growth and financial benefits. Responsibilities include: Contact potential or existing customers to inform them about a product or service; ability to present solution and its value to a prospect over the phone; answer questions about products or the company; ask questions to understand customer requirements and close sales; enter and update customer information in the database; keep records of calls and sale and note useful information in the CRM; process orders in an accurate manner; and go the “extra mile” to meet sales quota and facilitate future sales. Application: In order to apply, please send a resume to Tammy White: twhite@runbeck.net.

Program Manager, Overseas Voting Initiative, Council of State Governments — the Program Manager of CSG’s Overseas Voting Initiative, funded through a cooperative agreement with the US Dept. of Defense (DOD) Federal Voting Assistance Program (FVAP), provides day-to-day management and oversight of the Initiative, including research and policy analysis of electronic absentee voting systems for military voters, and development and dissemination of educational policy programming and deliverables to state leaders in support of the cooperative agreement. The Program Manager works within CSG’s Center of Innovation and in cooperation with CSG’s policy and executive management teams as well as regional offices, affiliates and members to support, monitor and improve state elections processes for military and overseas voters. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Project Manager (Austin, TX) – Hart InterCivic — Hart InterCivic is looking for a project manager to work with our Professional Services Team. The project manager oversees the deployment of voting systems and training to both existing and new Hart customers. The ideal candidate has experience in the elections industry, is PMP certified, and is motivated to achieve success for our customers with initiative. Travel up to 80 percent. Reports to the Manager of Professional Services. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Project Manager (San Leandro, CA or Sacramento, CA) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking an experienced Project Manager to join our team in either San Leandro, CA or Sacramento, CA! This position will be responsible for the effective technical project management of assigned projects which includes but not limited to, business, functional, and risk analysis as well as implementation of new processes, equipment and systems. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Python Developer, Clear Ballot — Clear Ballot seeks a talented python developer in the Boston area to assume responsibility for an existing suite of python scripts to create files for use with ClearVote(TM) digital voting system. Job responsibilities: Maintain and enhance existing python scripts that read PDF formatted ballot styles and produce the files needed by ClearVote (TM) digital voting system to tabulate said ballot; Run existing python scripts to generate marked test ballots for use in testing ClearVote(TM); Develop and execute test plans to guarantee ClearVote tabulates marked ballots correctly; Expand PDF parsing capabilities as new customer’s ballot styles are introduced; Leverage analytics you gather to improve performance through script and/or hardware changes; Must perform these duties within aggressive timelines that often require working outside of normal business hours. Application: For the complete listing and to apply, click here.

Senior Level Software Developer, BPro — We are a well-established small business that has been developing requirements and producing software for the needs of state governments since 1985 and continue to maintain and upgrade many of those systems. We have offices in Pierre, South Dakota, Fargo, North Dakota, Minnesota & Virginia. We’re currently looking for an energetic and intelligent .Net Developer to join our growing team. Our ideal candidate is one who loves to learn, enjoys working as a team, and who can multitask and meet deadlines. Skills required: .NET, VB, VBA, ASP, SQL, HTML, and JavaScript. A four-year college degree is the minimum educational requirement. All applicants must have excellent written and verbal communications skills. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Senior Software Developer, Runbeck— Runbeck Election Services is looking for full stack enthusiasts who are comfortable tackling end-to-end and enjoy building products that solve big problems and delight customers. We’re a collaborative team who knows how to get things done (Lone Rangers need not apply). We believe that small teams focused on shipping software move the fastest and make the most impact. The ideal candidate for this position has extensive back end skills (C#, MVC, ASP.Net, SQL Server) paired with solid web and desktop skills (IIS, JavaScript, HTML 5, CSS, jQuery, WPF, Win Forms). Must have a solid grasp of our basic toolset (Jira, Visual Studio). Willing to learn new plug-ins and IDE enhancements in order to boost your productivity and are excited to introduce us to new tooling experiences that have worked for you in the past. You bring discipline and care about implementation practices. You are familiar with Agile/Scrum processes, practice common design patterns, embrace clean coding principles, and employ many other techniques in an effort to bring a high level of software craftsmanship to your finished product. Application: In order to apply, please send a resume to Tammy White: twhite@runbeck.net.

Software Developer II (Toronto, ON) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking an experienced Software Developer to join our team in Toronto! This position will be responsible for providing high-level technical expertise to the design, development, coding, testing and debugging of new software products and/or significant enhancements to existing software products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Software Product Specialist II (Denver, CO) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Software Product Specialist II to join our team in Denver, Colorado! This position will be responsible for delivering a wide variety of technical and non-technical customer support services related to the implementation, operation, repair, maintenance and upgrades of Dominion Voting Systems technology products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Software Product Specialist II (Reno, NV) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Software Product Specialist II to join our team in Reno, NV! This position will be responsible for delivering a wide variety of technical and non-technical customer support services related to the implementation, operation, repair, maintenance and upgrades of Dominion Voting Systems technology products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Software Product Specialist II (Phoenix, AZ) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Software Product Specialist II to join our team in Phoenix, AZ! This position will be responsible for delivering a wide variety of technical and non-technical customer support services related to the implementation, operation, repair, maintenance and upgrades of Dominion Voting Systems technology products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Software Product Specialist II (San Leandro, CA) – Dominion Voting Systems — Dominion Voting Systems is seeking a Software Product Specialist II to join our team in San Leandro, CA! This position will be responsible for delivering a wide variety of technical and non-technical customer support services related to the implementation, operation, repair, maintenance and upgrades of Dominion Voting Systems technology products. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

Systems Engineer, Clear Ballot — We are looking for a talented Systems Engineer who has both a technical and services/support background which enables them to quickly assess customer needs and offer value to Clear Ballot’s customers. The Systems Engineer will gain a deep understanding of how Clear Ballot’s products operate and their optimal configuration to build a streamlined installation process of the Clear Vote election system. The ideal candidate for this position can prioritize mission critical tasks and coordinate the implementation and expansion of our systems. They will be able to work directly with customers, display innovation, think conceptually and act tactically to build consensus around system installation and enhancement and meet deadlines. Application: For the complete job listing and to apply, click here.

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Voting Booths
Each aluminum briefcase contains the following: aluminum legs, privacy shield, writing base, light assembly. All units are in great shape dimensions are 22”x 18”x 3“. MFG: ESL. Election supplies Limited, Napa California. Quantity: 400 Price per unit is $50. Contact Greg Larson 408.569.1004

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